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Old 04-27-2015, 08:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Polish here! There are a lot of Poles here. But historically, many of them are in Chicago and NYC.
And in NJ. Towns like Garfield, Wallington have a polish flavor to it with many restaurants
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Old 04-27-2015, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
Well I can tell you my grandma spoke Yiddish, not Polish.
She spoke Yiddish in addition to Polish, not in replacement of it. Yiddish was the common language for Jews from different nations in Europe.
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Old 04-27-2015, 09:12 PM
 
Location: California
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Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
I have always wondered because there is quite a few places with large polish populations. What is the stereotypical occupation of the Polish immigrant? The irish, Italians have theres, what is the Poles? The Irish were bartenders, and police officers, the Italians did construction.
I don't know about others but my Grandma was a seamstress at Bobby Brooks in Cleveland until she retired. Tough life. She lived long enough to bury three of her four children after becoming a widow at a young age.

I have been unable to find out any information on her family she left behind when she was sent here at the age of 14 years on her own. I hope they are okay.
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Old 04-28-2015, 01:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
She spoke Yiddish in addition to Polish, not in replacement of it. Yiddish was the common language for Jews from different nations in Europe.
Perhaps, although she came from a predominantly Jewish town (Sokolow) and probably had very limited contact with Polish non-Jews before she came to the US. I do know that she didn't speak a word of English when she arrived in America, and she and my aunt often had entire conversations in Yiddish. As a kid, even though I didn't explicitly know what they were saying, their banter was so expressive and animated that I could kind of get the point. I still use many of Yiddish words and phrases that I picked up from her because Yiddish is so descriptive yet direct, and there's usually not an exact English translation (and if there were, it wouldn't get the point across in quite the same way). It's a beautiful language- so colorful, sarcastic and wise.
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Old 04-28-2015, 02:13 PM
 
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The majority of the cleaning staff at my work here in NY are immigrants from Poland. They are very brash and direct, but hard workers. In the past 5 years I've noticed more Poles, they've replaced Puerto Ricans as the majority of the office cleaning staff at many NYC office buildings.
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Old 04-29-2015, 07:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MissLadyLexi25 View Post

It would interesting to know if their is still any places in the USA were you can still see elements of the Polish immigration experience/culture.
Michigan still has a very Polish culture, especially in Hamtramck. I guess most people are 2 to 3rd generation Polish and have not lost touch with their culture yet. We have Paczki Day, day before lent where people line up front of Polish Bakery. We still have Polish Super Market in my neighborhood. We have Polish Art Center and Polish Village Café & lot of food place specifically around Polish. Currently 20% of the population are identified as Polish but in 1970 it was 90%
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