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Old 04-26-2015, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,227,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongNote View Post
Yep, I lived in San Diego for about a year and a half and I couldn't understand for the life of me why it's so expensive. Unless you're very much into the beach and surfing, San Diego blows, BIG TIME! Even if you are into the beach, there are better cities to live than San Diego.
Los Angeles County itself has a GDP higher than Saudi Arabia. When you factor in Orange County (arguably the third most robust economic area on the West Coast behind the Bay Area and Seattle), Ventura County, and the Inland Empire, the Greater Los Angeles area has a GDP comparable to that of Mexico. Now...the 5-county L.A. region has 18 million residents; Mexico, 118 million. Pretty impressive.

Put another way, Greater L.A. would have the fourth largest economy in the U.S. if it were a state, behind California itself, Texas, and New York State (including NYC). The Bay Area would rank sixth between Pennsylvania and Ohio. (Source: Los Angeles is nation's 4th largest economy; Bay Area ranks as 6th largest - Sacramento Business Journal). You could argue that the Bay Area's stature is even more impressive (and it already is on a GDP per capita basis) since that 10-county region has only eight million people--10m fewer than L.A.

Now, San Diego County is still respectable economically given its size and stature, but that's it: size and stature. Employers still depress wages here compared to L.A. and the Bay. The cultural isolation is surprising despite its proximity to both L.A. and Tijuana. The only sectors thriving in S.D. are biotech, tourism, and a little venture capital. I grew up in small towns and like 'em, but I'm kinda hoping that a city feels like a city, which S.D. really does not.

My takeaway point: I can pay about the same that I pay to live in San Diego to instead live in much more robust, cosmopolitan, economically stronger places like Orange County, L.A., or even the Bay Area (the East Bay's and Gilroy/Morgan Hill's housing prices aren't as wacky as Silicon Valley's). And I have lived in all three previously.

Last edited by EclecticEars; 04-26-2015 at 09:43 AM..
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Old 04-26-2015, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Both feet on banana peel's, on ice.
351 posts, read 448,818 times
Reputation: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I guess I found out very early in life that happiness depends more on what's inside of us rather than what's outside of us. I've been able to feel very fulfilled and happy and affectionate toward just about every place I've ever lived. Every single place has had it's positive attributes and interesting activities. There are a few exceptions when it comes to whether or not I "loved" living someplace, but I'm not small minded enough to assume that just because I didn't personally care for much about a particular place, there aren't others who LOVE it there for their very own, very valid reasons.


Yep, I understand what your saying. I too, learned to soak it up wherever you land. Also, if we're not at Peace with ourselves, then we cannot truly be a Peace with anyone else. This is part of each individual's "Journey." As we journey to our destinations, we soak up life experiences and we are "tested" through hard times, good times, relationships with others, while learning more and more about ourselves.

Some people really "love" or enjoy living in places such as Texas and that's ok. A buddy who moved to Texas from California finds Texas to be the best place he has ever lived. I've acknowledged the positives in this state however, I told him that its not home for us, no matter how "practical" others find it to be. He cannot understand why I don't love it here the way he does. My only issue is when "some" folks here try to convince me that this is the best place for me. I simply tell them, "everything, ain't for everybody."

I believe we should trust our intuitions, and follow that feeling. If/When we do that, I believe that we know when we are in the right place.
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Old 04-26-2015, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,742 posts, read 36,145,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USNomad View Post

Yep, I understand what your saying. I too, learned to soak it up wherever you land. Also, if we're not at Peace with ourselves, then we cannot truly be a Peace with anyone else. This is part of each individual's "Journey." As we journey to our destinations, we soak up life experiences and we are "tested" through hard times, good times, relationships with others, while learning more and more about ourselves.

Some people really "love" or enjoy living in places such as Texas and that's ok. A buddy who moved to Texas from California finds Texas to be the best place he has ever lived. I've acknowledged the positives in this state however, I told him that its not home for us, no matter how "practical" others find it to be. He cannot understand why I don't love it here the way he does. My only issue is when "some" folks here try to convince me that this is the best place for me. I simply tell them, "everything, ain't for everybody."

I believe we should trust our intuitions, and follow that feeling. If/When we do that, I believe that we know when we are in the right place.
I totally agree with what you're saying. Texas isn't for everyone. New Hampshire isn't for everyone. California isn't for everyone. Urban centers aren't for everyone. Small towns aren't for everyone. Country living isn't for everyone.

Of course, out of all the places I've lived (and I've lived in a lot) I have my favorites - Virginia is actually my favorite state (Texas comes in at second place overall). And I actually didn't like one area of Texas that I lived in at all, and if I only had that one interlude to gauge it by, I'd probably still be saying today, twenty five years later, that I don't like Texas. But luckily, I have had the opportunity to live in other areas of this very large state, and I've come to appreciate it a lot - I love it in fact.

My point isn't that "Texas is the best state" - my point is that even if we live somewhere in a particular state and don't like it - we are short sighted to assume that we'd feel the same way in another region or even town of that same state.

I've found that whether or not I like a place has more to do with the size of the city and the amenities, weather, and proximity to family, than it does to any other factors. If I want entertainment, I can find it or make it. But I want family and amenities within easy driving distance. I want to live in a small city with a large urban center pretty close. I want warm weather. I want to be able to fly or drive to the beach or mountains within a few hours. Those personal preferences leave me MANY good choices in many different states.

The politics of a particular state don't bother me much one way or the other, unless they have a negative impact on the standard of living and/or my personal taxes - a negative impact which overrides the positives.

It's all a balancing act, but the bottom line is that it's a lot easier to be happier in a lot more places when you're happy within yourself.
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Old 04-26-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,227,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I totally agree with what you're saying. Texas isn't for everyone. New Hampshire isn't for everyone. California isn't for everyone. Urban centers aren't for everyone. Small towns aren't for everyone. Country living isn't for everyone.

Of course, out of all the places I've lived (and I've lived in a lot) I have my favorites - Virginia is actually my favorite state (Texas comes in at second place overall). And I actually didn't like one area of Texas that I lived in at all, and if I only had that one interlude to gauge it by, I'd probably still be saying today, twenty five years later, that I don't like Texas. But luckily, I have had the opportunity to live in other areas of this very large state, and I've come to appreciate it a lot - I love it in fact.

My point isn't that "Texas is the best state" - my point is that even if we live somewhere in a particular state and don't like it - we are short sighted to assume that we'd feel the same way in another region or even town of that same state.

I've found that whether or not I like a place has more to do with the size of the city and the amenities, weather, and proximity to family, than it does to any other factors. If I want entertainment, I can find it or make it. But I want family and amenities within easy driving distance. I want to live in a small city with a large urban center pretty close. I want warm weather. I want to be able to fly or drive to the beach or mountains within a few hours. Those personal preferences leave me MANY good choices in many different states.

The politics of a particular state don't bother me much one way or the other, unless they have a negative impact on the standard of living and/or my personal taxes - a negative impact which overrides the positives.

It's all a balancing act, but the bottom line is that it's a lot easier to be happier in a lot more places when you're happy within yourself.
Well stated.

If someone hates living in West Hollywood, or in Sacramento, or in Fresno, and has no other experience living in at least one different place in California, then that person's perception of California might be tainted. As stated in my first post on this thread, I moved to San Diego rather reluctantly; thankfully, California will go on in its diverse form, and will not fall into the Pacific Ocean. (And, who knows, SD might grow on me yet...maybe...)

Last edited by EclecticEars; 04-26-2015 at 06:12 PM..
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Old 04-26-2015, 06:58 PM
 
105 posts, read 78,569 times
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I'm a Floridian living in NY, and I like Texas.

For people moving from TX to the NE.

We welcome you with open arms, just make sure you leave an Aviation Job hanging for me.
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Old 04-26-2015, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Both feet on banana peel's, on ice.
351 posts, read 448,818 times
Reputation: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
My point isn't that "Texas is the best state" - my point is that even if we live somewhere in a particular state and don't like it - we are short sighted to assume that we'd feel the same way in another region or even town of that same state.
Yes, I enjoyed my time in Virginia as well-from the Blue Ridge Mtns to Lake Anne Plaza to Chick's Beach to Cape Charles.

As for Texas, I've traveled all over this state both for business and pleasure, and I really enjoy the areas/small towns and scenery from Pipe Creek to Alpine.

That's another thing i've learned-explore as much as you can, while you can.

Also, I'm amazed at how many people live in and love Texas, but haven't even explored their own backyard. Ton's to explore in this state such as Mcdonald Observatory, Palo Duro Canyon, Big Bend National Recreation area, Padre Island-from Corpus to Port Isabel, Pedernales Falls, Marble Falls to drinking some Crazy Water slushies in Mineral Wells. But then again, perhaps not everyone is into exploring. When I live somewhere, I really live it to make sure I didn't miss out on a great opportunity to experience what a place has to offer. Again, just enjoying the journey before I make a move.

But I get your point.

Last edited by USNomad; 04-26-2015 at 09:14 PM..
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Old 04-27-2015, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,742 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63365
Quote:
Originally Posted by USNomad View Post
Yes, I enjoyed my time in Virginia as well-from the Blue Ridge Mtns to Lake Anne Plaza to Chick's Beach to Cape Charles.

As for Texas, I've traveled all over this state both for business and pleasure, and I really enjoy the areas/small towns and scenery from Pipe Creek to Alpine.

That's another thing i've learned-explore as much as you can, while you can.

Also, I'm amazed at how many people live in and love Texas, but haven't even explored their own backyard. Ton's to explore in this state such as Mcdonald Observatory, Palo Duro Canyon, Big Bend National Recreation area, Padre Island-from Corpus to Port Isabel, Pedernales Falls, Marble Falls to drinking some Crazy Water slushies in Mineral Wells. But then again, perhaps not everyone is into exploring. When I live somewhere, I really live it to make sure I didn't miss out on a great opportunity to experience what a place has to offer. Again, just enjoying the journey before I make a move.

But I get your point.
Oh I know what you mean about exploring! I have always been really big into that, as well as photographing my explorations.

I haven't been to Big Bend yet, if you can believe that - or the McDonald Observatory, but I've been everywhere else on your Texas list - and then some, of course. I really love the Frio River too, and Bandera - and my favorite Texas city is Fort Worth. Love me some Fort Worth! In fact, we're taking another road trip there later this week, just for some more exploring.

In about a year, we're going to visit the northeast - I've never been to Massachusetts so we're going to go to Boston and Salem and then drive up the coast nearly to Canada. I am really excited about that.

Hopefully my daughter's husband will be stationed in the VA beach area on his next Air Force assignment. It's the top pick on their dream sheet and since they've been in Guam and that's considered a hardship tour they're supposed to get top priority when it comes to picking their next assignment, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed on Virginia. For them and for me!

My younger daughter was in the AF and was lucky enough to be stationed in that area for five years. It was so cool to be able to visit her and go back to all those places I'd seen and lived around during my childhood. I even found the two houses we lived in! They'd been maintained very well, which was nice to see.
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Old 04-27-2015, 11:28 AM
 
779 posts, read 697,288 times
Reputation: 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by EclecticEars View Post
Los Angeles County itself has a GDP higher than Saudi Arabia. When you factor in Orange County (arguably the third most robust economic area on the West Coast behind the Bay Area and Seattle), Ventura County, and the Inland Empire, the Greater Los Angeles area has a GDP comparable to that of Mexico. Now...the 5-county L.A. region has 18 million residents; Mexico, 118 million. Pretty impressive.

Put another way, Greater L.A. would have the fourth largest economy in the U.S. if it were a state, behind California itself, Texas, and New York State (including NYC). The Bay Area would rank sixth between Pennsylvania and Ohio. (Source: Los Angeles is nation's 4th largest economy; Bay Area ranks as 6th largest - Sacramento Business Journal). You could argue that the Bay Area's stature is even more impressive (and it already is on a GDP per capita basis) since that 10-county region has only eight million people--10m fewer than L.A.

Now, San Diego County is still respectable economically given its size and stature, but that's it: size and stature. Employers still depress wages here compared to L.A. and the Bay. The cultural isolation is surprising despite its proximity to both L.A. and Tijuana. The only sectors thriving in S.D. are biotech, tourism, and a little venture capital. I grew up in small towns and like 'em, but I'm kinda hoping that a city feels like a city, which S.D. really does not.

My takeaway point: I can pay about the same that I pay to live in San Diego to instead live in much more robust, cosmopolitan, economically stronger places like Orange County, L.A., or even the Bay Area (the East Bay's and Gilroy/Morgan Hill's housing prices aren't as wacky as Silicon Valley's). And I have lived in all three previously.
Wow, a lot of facts there. I would definitely choose most any city in Orange or Los Angeles County over San Diego. Once you get past the mild weather (Which all So-Cal cities have) and solid job market, SD has nothing that justifies it's high cost of living
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Old 04-27-2015, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Northern California
935 posts, read 1,715,076 times
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Pretty much every resident who moved to Sacramento from the Bay Area can attest to this. They didnt move because Sac was suddenly becoming hip and trendy. They did so because the Bay Area priced them out.
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Old 04-27-2015, 03:31 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,483,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongNote View Post
Wow, a lot of facts there. I would definitely choose most any city in Orange or Los Angeles County over San Diego. Once you get past the mild weather (Which all So-Cal cities have) and solid job market, SD has nothing that justifies it's high cost of living
I've always suspected the SD housing costs are inflated by the numbers transplants deadest against living in Los Angeles.
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