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Old 04-22-2015, 09:04 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
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Its been around for a while - long term is it really beneficial - especially financially

that area of Canada is great - a real jewel to me but is it really beneficial to break from Canada?
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: North Texas
1,743 posts, read 958,771 times
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All for it.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:43 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,316,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonjour185 View Post
When you cross in Québec from Ontario it is a different nation in every way except the government federal, and vice versa..
Having had multiple visits to Quebec back when I lived in New England, I can agree to this. When I crossed the border from Maine into New Brunswick, honestly it just feels a lot like more of Maine. I did a number of roadtrips to Montreal and Quebec City when I was younger. When heading up I-89 to the Quebec/Vermont border, the feeling of having crossed into another country is very palpable in many different ways. Quebec definitely has a lot distinctive character about it that feels worlds away from places like Calgary.

Politically its hard for me to get my head around Canada and Quebec splitting up. For one, the Maritime provinces are having enough economic hardships as it is. Being severed from the rest of the country would really suck for them. Also, the Parti Quebecois hasn't exactly come up with an adequate plan to form their own currency, and other national banking hurdles. "Oh sure, we'll still keep using loonies" . I've always felt that both sides have too much to loose, on the Quebec sovereignty issue. However, if politicians in Quebec could actually figure out a way to demonstrate more self sustainability as a sovereign nation, then perhaps it could actually become a reality.

Bonjour, how do the younger generations of Quebec feel about separatism compared to past movements back in the 80's and 90's?

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 04-22-2015 at 10:09 PM..
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:33 PM
 
Location: europe
77 posts, read 77,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
Honestly from what I've seen as an outside observer Quebec really is vastly different from the rest of Canada. Quebec is a francophone nation and English Canada is hardly bilingual at all. They really do have different opinions on how things should actually be run. Their views of the United States are almost completely polar opposite with the rest of Canada being very anti-American where as Quebec generally has a rather good opinion of the United States. The mentalities really are different and the fact of the matter is all this time later they still haven't converged in there mentalities pretty much at all really speaks volumes about how supposedly "united" Canada is.
I am European but spent a lot of time in both countries. This is true, Anglo Canadians are fast to compare themselves to Americans and say something bad about the US. It is silly, like they will tell you that they are better than Americans because of something like having more fresh water lakes. It's like, ok, so what, you sound desperate with the me vs. America crap. that's just my honest take. French Canadians are more easy going and don't care about that me vs. America crap.
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:48 AM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,833,125 times
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Sounds like i could really get to like Quebecans.
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Randolph, MA
508 posts, read 641,958 times
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Originally Posted by dtmann View Post
French Canadians are more easy going and don't care about that me vs. America crap.
Somewhat. Quebecois have a habit of American bashing too. It just has a different tint to it. I definitely think PQ should have some sort of arrangement like PR has with the US. Also, apparently having the monarchy is an issue for them? Just find a way to remove the title. With the Maritime provinces being Anglophone, PQ will have a hard time getting out of the Federation without a fight.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonjour185 View Post
What do American people think about Québec independence.

Some background:

We were conquered by the empire of the British in the 1700's. They deported many who went to Louisiana and became called «Cajuns». They tried to wipe out the culture of the rest of, and this includes the Canadian government that inherited British empire lands in North America. In Québec we survived as the lower class (85% of the population) ruled by the British/English Canadians.

We want to be a republic like the USA. Canada is a monarchy with a European monarch at the head of state, the English Queen, and we do not want it. The USA is the land of the free and a strong model for success, this is something that enough credit is not given in to. I am interested in American thought because Americans are reputed for supporting free people and self determination. We desire to a closer alliance with the Americans and enjoy having such good neighbours. We also envision a Québec that is peaceful like a Norway or Switzerland. We have come far since the start of our movement in the 1960's but fell short of independence. In 1995 during our second indepandance vote (the first was in 1980, we lost 60-40), 61% of Québecois voted for independence, but of course the people who conquered us voted too and so this shifted the independence vote to 49.5% to 50.5%. An independent Québec will be the 29th largest economy in the world, 20th largest country in the world, and have a living standard similar to UK and Finland.
Aside for the plea for the immediate necessity of independence I mostly agree with this, with one major exception -

The deportation you refer to at the start wasn't really related to the territory of present-day Quebec.

France had two colonies: Acadia (present-day Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island) and New France (present-day Quebec but also much of Ontario and the Midwestern US).

The settlers of Acadia were from different parts of France than the settlers of New France.

It was the Acadians who were deported, and the Cajuns are mostly descended from them, not from people who were deported from New France/Quebec.

There was of course some repression in Quebec (New France) by the British, but the British never attempted to deport the population of New France at all.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassNative2891 View Post
Somewhat. Quebecois have a habit of American bashing too. It just has a different tint to it. .
Anti-Americanism in Quebec is more related to criticism of U.S. foreign policy. Similar to what you might see in European countries.

In this sense it differs from the usual criticism of the U.S. in Anglo-Canada where there is much more of a focus on American society and the way of life down there.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Randolph, MA
508 posts, read 641,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Anti-Americanism in Quebec is more related to criticism of U.S. foreign policy. Similar to what you might see in European countries.

In this sense it differs from the usual criticism of the U.S. in Anglo-Canada where there is much more of a focus on American society and the way of life down there.
I'll never forget being 14 and getting bashed on because of Bushs foreign policy, while just trying to get a chocolate filled croissant from the Dep.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post

Do you not see how your entire justification for an independent Quebec is separation? Do the folks in Gatineau feel completely foreign to their Ottawa neighbors? You guys can't even share public facilities with each other.
I live in Gatineau. No people here and in Ottawa don't feel foreign to each other but there is still a difference just the same.

We are one metro area and many of us share workplaces (this is true of the federal government employment sector especially) and friendships can develop as a result but by and large the francophones tend to hang out more with the francophones and the anglophones with the anglophones I'd say.

Ottawa and Gatineau are in different provinces (so like different states) so there are different education systems and different public services just as the systems are different in New York vs. New Jersey.

Of course, the language barrier does provide an added difference. The francophone side of Ottawa-Gatineau has its own media and cultural scene for example. There are celebrities that are popular all across Quebec (including two-days' drive from here) who would be mobbed if they walked through a mall in Gatineau but if you cross the bridge to Ottawa (10 minutes away) they could walk around completely un-noticed there.

That said, there is a largish "cross-over" population that is reasonably (in some cases entirely) comfortable in both the francophone and anglophone realities of Canada that exists in the Ottawa-Gatineau area, and also in and around Montreal and in part of New Brunswick as well.

Both my wife and I could be the poster children for this reality, but even in Ottawa, Gatineau and Montreal, a strong majority people are not really "cross-overs" like we are. Even my kids, who are born and raised in Quebec, won't likely be seamless "cross-over Canadians'' like I am and at best will likely be Québécois francophones who speak decent second language English.

And of course the number of "cross-over Canadians" dwindles extremely rapidly as you travel away from this small part of the country, and there are only the occasional tiny blips where you may again occasionally encounter people like me here and there.
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