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Old 04-23-2015, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
I cannot imagine SoCal being more expensive than Fairfield County for purchasing a house. I'm maybe wrong, but I don't think you're fully aware of the properties out there. If you try to purchase an ocean facing property sure, but somewhere in Riverside is basically dirt cheap.

Of course, I'd never want to live in Riverside, that's another story.
SoCal housing prices are about the same as Fairfield County. However, if I just move one county over to the east (New Haven county), housing prices are 43% lower. It's very possible to get decent property within 1,000 feet from the coastline in Connecticut for under $250K. Can't do that in CA.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:32 PM
 
305 posts, read 238,078 times
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I always though that most Northerners considered Connecticut and New Jersey suburbs of New York City.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arc-lang View Post
I always though that most Northerners considered Connecticut and New Jersey suburbs of New York City.
New Jersey more so, because about half of NJ is part of the NYC metro area. As for Connecticut, none of the counties are part of the NYC metro area. The vast majority of Connecticut was not sprawled out from NYC, but rather from Hartford, New Haven and Norwich. Most people in the Hartford area don't care or talk about or ever go to NYC. I was 20 years old, the first time I went to NYC, and grew up in Hartford County.
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:04 PM
 
Location: USA
2,753 posts, read 2,216,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
New Jersey more so, because about half of NJ is part of the NYC metro area. As for Connecticut, none of the counties are part of the NYC metro area. The vast majority of Connecticut was not sprawled out from NYC, but rather from Hartford, New Haven and Norwich. Most people in the Hartford area don't care or talk about or ever go to NYC. I was 20 years old, the first time I went to NYC, and grew up in Hartford County.
Fairfield County, Litchfield County, and New Haven County are technically considered part of the NYC Metropolitan area. Well in the CSA.
MSA includes pretty much all of downstate NY, eastern Pennsylvania, and northern New Jersey. CSA includes Connecticut. It's all known as the Tri-State area.

About the Connecticut's "sprawl",

Connecticut has seen an increase on huge congestion of traffic, new shopping centers, more noise, more air pollution, more and more homes, less fields, less barns, and less traditional New England's vistas over the past few decades. Back in the early 1990's we were warned that over time we would have become more and more sprawl. Much of Connecticut's boom came from the 1950's and 1960's when the post World War II suburbs began to take shape. We started turning from an agriculture state to a more industrial and manufacturing state over the years. Many towns in lower Fairfield County started to create developed grids of neat lots and homes. I feel like many towns here have lost their identity to suburban sprawl. You know since the 70's Vermont has taken drastic measures to prohibit big commercial development that do you meet requirements for water and air cleanliness. We should have listened to Vermont. As for sprawl from NYC. I think Stamford is probably a good hit from NYC sprawl. Many companies moved from NYC to Stamford right after 9/11. There are thousands and thousands of people who work in NY and live in Connecticut. More and more people did it because it was cheaper to live in CT. Remember we had no income tax until Weicker. Without NYC, i dont think Fairfield County wouldn't be even near where it is today. Stamford grew because of NYC. If NYC does well then Stamford does well. Most cities in the Tri State Area are like that. I feel like New Haven is more independent. I do agree though on the Hartford, New Haven, and Norwich comment youve made. I think New London and Groton played a huge role on Norwich's development.
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Old 04-23-2015, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,111,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
Fairfield County, Litchfield County, and New Haven County are technically considered part of the NYC Metropolitan area. Well in the CSA.
MSA includes pretty much all of downstate NY, eastern Pennsylvania, and northern New Jersey. CSA includes Connecticut. It's all known as the Tri-State area.

About the Connecticut's "sprawl",

Connecticut has seen an increase on huge congestion of traffic, new shopping centers, more noise, more air pollution, more and more homes, less fields, less barns, and less traditional New England's vistas over the past few decades. Back in the early 1990's we were warned that over time we would have become more and more sprawl. Much of Connecticut's boom came from the 1950's and 1960's when the post World War II suburbs began to take shape. We started turning from an agriculture state to a more industrial and manufacturing state over the years. Many towns in lower Fairfield County started to create developed grids of neat lots and homes. I feel like many towns here have lost their identity to suburban sprawl. You know since the 70's Vermont has taken drastic measures to prohibit big commercial development that do you meet requirements for water and air cleanliness. We should have listened to Vermont. As for sprawl from NYC. I think Stamford is probably a good hit from NYC sprawl. Many companies moved from NYC to Stamford right after 9/11. There are thousands and thousands of people who work in NY and live in Connecticut. More and more people did it because it was cheaper to live in CT. Remember we had no income tax until Weicker. Without NYC, i dont think Fairfield County wouldn't be even near where it is today. Stamford grew because of NYC. If NYC does well then Stamford does well. Most cities in the Tri State Area are like that. I feel like New Haven is more independent. I do agree though on the Hartford, New Haven, and Norwich comment youve made. I think New London and Groton played a huge role on Norwich's development.
Well, I know that three counties in CT are part of the NYC CSA, but CSA's are such massive areas that they don't really mean much for everyday life of the average person living within the CSA. That's why I place more emphasis on MSA. For the typical person who lives, commutes and works, most of it is done within an MSA, not a CSA. The vast majority of people who live in Fairfield County also work in Fairfield County. The same can be said for New Haven County.
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Old 04-23-2015, 10:22 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,481,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Yeah I don't understand that. One of my lifelong best friends who is a New England native, recently lived in San Diego for two years and didn't like it. She said that most SoCal natives (and transplants even) act like SoCal and California in general is paradise. She found it laughable, and even came to realize that many, if not most of them, rarely, or don't even care to travel outside of California. She said that California is not paradise at all.
Your friend said this? Well, that settles it.
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Old 04-24-2015, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,286 posts, read 3,501,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
Your friend said this? Well, that settles it.
This, combined with the locked-in opinion after a five day visit.
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Old 04-24-2015, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,911,740 times
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I always got along really well with people from the Northeast. I grew up mostly in the Midwest and South but I always got along really well with people when I visited CT, Boston area, NYC, NJ, MD and PA. I really like how Northeast residents in general tend to be blunt and tell you what is on their mind, I really like the ethnic pride they take in being Italian, Irish, Jewish and proud of their ancestry. People always told me women were rude before I visited the East Coast/Northeast but I thought East Coast women were pretty cool, I thought they were outgoing without being being as conservative and boring as Southern women. I think these lists have some truth to them but they are mostly outdated stereotypes.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:11 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,242,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
I cannot imagine SoCal being more expensive than Fairfield County for purchasing a house. I'm maybe wrong, but I don't think you're fully aware of the properties out there. If you try to purchase an ocean facing property sure, but somewhere in Riverside is basically dirt cheap.

Of course, I'd never want to live in Riverside, that's another story.
Fairfield County, CT on average, would be more expensive than Orange County, CA. Speaking very generally, the NYC metro has somewhat more expensive housing than the LA metro.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:13 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,242,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
SoCal housing prices are about the same as Fairfield County. However, if I just move one county over to the east (New Haven county), housing prices are 43% lower. It's very possible to get decent property within 1,000 feet from the coastline in Connecticut for under $250K. Can't do that in CA.
Not really. Connecticut isn't on the ocean, and Cali is. Not a reasonable comparison. And you cannot get coastal land in CT for 250k, unless you're in the middle of a slum.

Generally speaking, only the rich live along the LI Sound in CT.
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