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Old 04-24-2015, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,126,475 times
Reputation: 7075

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Maryland is more Northeastern than Connecticut. Five of Maryland's counties are among the Top 20 wealthiest counties in the U.S. You know how many Connecticut counties made the list?

List of highest-income counties in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Zero. It's simply a lifestyle CT residents could never understand.

So now the criteria to be considered a Northeastern state is based solely on wealth? In that case, Hawaii should be northeastern.

You do realize that the Northeast is simply a geographic area, right? Even the Census Bureau considers Maryland as the South.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:35 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,254,190 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
That's why I said WITHIN 1,000 FEET of the coastline. Go on the MLS now and you will see that it's possible in CT. I know the coast is not on the ocean (it's on LI Sound), but it's still just as scenic as the ocean.
The Sound isn't the Ocean. There's a reason the Hamptons are a million times more expensive than anything on the Sound.

And where in Connecticut can I get a house for 250k close to the Sound (non-slum area?). It's almost all very expensive, no different than the CA coast.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:35 AM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,510,132 times
Reputation: 17589
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
So now the criteria to be considered a Northeastern state is based solely on wealth? In that case, Hawaii should be northeastern.

You do realize that the Northeast is simply a geographic area, right? Even the Census Bureau considers Maryland as the South.
Nep. Bajan is being facetious. Sarcastic, joking, not serious. It's all a joke given the barrage of "MD/DE/even VA ARE Northeastern!!" discussions on CD.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Randolph, MA
508 posts, read 642,667 times
Reputation: 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
So now the criteria to be considered a Northeastern state is based solely on wealth? In that case, Hawaii should be northeastern.

You do realize that the Northeast is simply a geographic area, right? Even the Census Bureau considers Maryland as the South.
I don't think he's serious. He's more than likely parodying the way CD thinks about this stuff.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:36 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,254,190 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I usually agree with you but not here. Most of CT is not in the metro region and other than Greenwich I can't think of another famous CT NYC suburb and I live in this metro region.

Not true. Around 70% of Connecticut is in the NYC metro.

And I can think of tons of famous suburbs in Connecticut. Greenwich, Darien, Westport, New Canaan and the like are all well known, and usually represented as the archetypical wealthy NYC suburbs (see films like Stepford Wives, Revolutionary Road, the Good Shepherd and the like).

These are the stereotypical suburbs where Wall Street execs and management-level people live.

In fact, when I think "rich NYC suburb", Greenwich is the first place that pops in my head. I think many would agree.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
You do realize that the Northeast is simply a geographic area, right? Even the Census Bureau considers Maryland as the South.
Wrong. Maryland plays in the Big 10. The Census is outdated.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...x-B1Gmap14.png
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Not true. Around 70% of Connecticut is in the NYC metro.

And I can think of tons of famous suburbs in Connecticut. Greenwich, Darien, Westport, New Canaan and the like are all well known, and usually represented as the archetypical wealthy NYC suburbs (see films like Stepford Wives, Revolutionary Road, the Good Shepherd and the like).

These are the stereotypical suburbs where Wall Street execs and management-level people live.

In fact, when I think "rich NYC suburb", Greenwich is the first place that pops in my head. I think many would agree.
Sounds a lot like Silver Spring.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,389,677 times
Reputation: 8050
Everyone should write to the census bureau or Dep of Ed or whoever set the boundary of the Mason-Dixon line to let them know we want it changed!

This is getting ridiculous!
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:42 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,254,190 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
NONE of CT is in the NYC Metro Area, in fact. Not a single CT county is included in the NYC MSA. Even if you're talking about CSA, that still leaves most CT counties NOT in the NYC CSA.

Most of CT is not part of, and doesn't even feel like it's part of NYC or the NYC metro area.
OK, so now I get what you're arguing. I definitely think you're wrong, but at least I get the line of reasoning.

In your opinion, a metro area is equivalent to an MSA, and not a CSA.

So, in your estimation, rural counties in PA 120 miles from Manhattan are "NYC" while urban counties close to Manhattan are not "NYC". Or, you think that empty desert land far from LA is "LA" while urbanized suburbs close to LA are not "LA". Or you think that SF is totally separate from Silicon Valley and they have absolutely nothing to do with one another. Silicon Valley may as well be in Japan, and Stanford may as well be on the moon, and both have nothing whatsoever to do with the tech growth in the SF Bay Area.

In the real world, CT would be less urbanized and linked with NYC if it were only MSA, and not CSA. The reason CT is part of the CSA is because CT, unlike Long Island, or Westchester, or most of Northern NJ, is a massive jobs center. Stamford is the most important jobs center in the NYC region outside of the regional core.

Saying that CT is not the metro area because it has its own jobs area is complete nonsense. If Long Island were to develop some highrise jobs center tomorrow, it wouldn't make LI less a part of the NYC region. It would just mean that it has a commercial hub now. Or, to take SF, if Silicon Valley crumbled tomorrow, then it would become part of the MSA, not the CSA. But that would be a bad thing, not a good thing, and make Silicon Valley less integrated with SF, not more.

And most of Connecticut definitely feels like its part of the NYC area. The busiest suburban rail line in the NYC area is in Connecticut, and the busiest suburban stations are in Connecticut. Coastal CT (where most people live) are very tied into NYC, every bit as much as the NY State and NJ suburbs (and much, much moreso than the PA parts of the metro area). The entire CT economy is linked to the NYC economy. CT is, by far, the most important financial center in the U.S. outside of Manhattan and has more hedge funds than anywhere on earth outside of Manhattan.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Everyone should write to the census bureau or Dep of Ed or whoever set the boundary of the Mason-Dixon line to let them know we want it changed!

This is getting ridiculous!
Exactly. Leave it to a bunch of geographers at an agency far, far away from Maryland to determine what Maryland's regional affilation should be.

I'd rather use a more reliable definition...like the one from the Department of Motor Vehicles or some more authoritative source.
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