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Old 04-24-2015, 10:34 AM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,522,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I thought that was implied by saying he (or she) would never live south of the Mason-Dixon.
What was implied by saying that? The author could live anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line based on that comment, I'm just wondering if he/she lives in the NYC region for mentioning CT, NY, and NJ and no other Northeastern states in particular.
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Old 04-24-2015, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,263,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
What was implied by saying that?
That Pennsylvania was Northeastern. It is north of the Mason-Dixon.
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Old 04-24-2015, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,464 posts, read 7,529,757 times
Reputation: 4363
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
What was implied by saying that? The author could live anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line based on that comment, I'm just wondering if he/she lives in the NYC region for mentioning CT, NY, and NJ and no other Northeastern states in particular.
I think that's true. This definitely seems to portray a bias of experiences towards the NYC tri-state area, which--let's not kid ourselves--tends to be the pocket of the Northeast with the most intense superiority complex (as evidenced by this very article).

As with any region of the US, trying to come up with some sort of all-encompassing list of relatable attributes will lead to some degree of debate.
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:30 PM
 
305 posts, read 238,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Wrong. Maryland plays in the Big 10. The Census is outdated.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...x-B1Gmap14.png

And Missouri and Kentucky play in the SEC. Your turn.
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:49 PM
 
Location: The South
5,233 posts, read 3,642,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
http://thoughtcatalog.com/maya-kachr...the-northeast/

Funny article!

I have lived in the Northeast my entire life and fit 10 out of 19 things on this list. So, I guess that means I'm a superior a'hole from the Northeast.

Can anyone else relate?

My favorite one is that we basically have a license to not have to be friendly. I also like the one about how CT people complain about CT, when in fact, it's a perfectly fine state.
I can't relate with the superior part.
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Old 04-24-2015, 03:09 PM
 
2,005 posts, read 1,485,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
OK, so now I get what you're arguing. I definitely think you're wrong, but at least I get the line of reasoning.

In your opinion, a metro area is equivalent to an MSA, and not a CSA.

So, in your estimation, rural counties in PA 120 miles from Manhattan are "NYC" while urban counties close to Manhattan are not "NYC". Or, you think that empty desert land far from LA is "LA" while urbanized suburbs close to LA are not "LA". Or you think that SF is totally separate from Silicon Valley and they have absolutely nothing to do with one another. Silicon Valley may as well be in Japan, and Stanford may as well be on the moon, and both have nothing whatsoever to do with the tech growth in the SF Bay Area.

In the real world, CT would be less urbanized and linked with NYC if it were only MSA, and not CSA. The reason CT is part of the CSA is because CT, unlike Long Island, or Westchester, or most of Northern NJ, is a massive jobs center. Stamford is the most important jobs center in the NYC region outside of the regional core.

Saying that CT is not the metro area because it has its own jobs area is complete nonsense. If Long Island were to develop some highrise jobs center tomorrow, it wouldn't make LI less a part of the NYC region. It would just mean that it has a commercial hub now. Or, to take SF, if Silicon Valley crumbled tomorrow, then it would become part of the MSA, not the CSA. But that would be a bad thing, not a good thing, and make Silicon Valley less integrated with SF, not more.

And most of Connecticut definitely feels like its part of the NYC area. The busiest suburban rail line in the NYC area is in Connecticut, and the busiest suburban stations are in Connecticut. Coastal CT (where most people live) are very tied into NYC, every bit as much as the NY State and NJ suburbs (and much, much moreso than the PA parts of the metro area). The entire CT economy is linked to the NYC economy. CT is, by far, the most important financial center in the U.S. outside of Manhattan and has more hedge funds than anywhere on earth outside of Manhattan.
If you look at nep's posting history, you'll see that he hates NYC and wants nothing to do with it.
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Old 04-24-2015, 05:14 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,335,259 times
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When it comes to evaluating what region a state should be in, it's nearly impossible to do, even with the smallest ones. I cannot say that all of Maryland is a northeastern state. I would say that the areas of Maryland in close proximity to I-95 definitely fit this criteria, as would be the case with Delaware (i.e. New Castle County). However, Kent County Delaware feels more southern to me than northeastern. Same thing with St. Mary's County in Maryland, or Dorchester County. You would feel as though you traveled back into time if you were to spend time around the Patuxent River area as it empties into the Chesapeake Bay. I would make a separate argument that Garrett County and Allegany County Maryland are way more in line with Appalachia than either the northeast or the south.
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Old 04-24-2015, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,135,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
When it comes to evaluating what region a state should be in, it's nearly impossible to do, even with the smallest ones. I cannot say that all of Maryland is a northeastern state. I would say that the areas of Maryland in close proximity to I-95 definitely fit this criteria, as would be the case with Delaware (i.e. New Castle County). However, Kent County Delaware feels more southern to me than northeastern. Same thing with St. Mary's County in Maryland, or Dorchester County. You would feel as though you traveled back into time if you were to spend time around the Patuxent River area as it empties into the Chesapeake Bay. I would make a separate argument that Garrett County and Allegany County Maryland are way more in line with Appalachia than either the northeast or the south.
That's why I just go by the U.S. Census Bureau official definitions of each region. According to them, Maryland is in the South. There must be a reason for that, otherwise wouldn't they group it in with the Northeast? Come on.

And according to them, the Middle Atlantic division consists of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Anything south of that is in the South Atlantic division. That means even Buffalo, NY is considered to be in the Middle Atlantic division.
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Old 04-24-2015, 09:44 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,522,205 times
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Look, this should not turn into another "what constitutes the Northeast?" thread. The author of this particular article (if you could call it that) we're discussing was clear in his/her definition of Northeast in number 1 of the 19 "signs" we're discussing, and it shouldn't be discussed any further in this thread. Pull up any of the 13,000 other threads on the issue to discuss if Maryland is Northeastern - for the purposes of this thread, based on the link, it is NOT.

This is just a thread about a fun little link that's supposed to weed out "superior a'hole" Northeasterners. It's not another debate. Let's discuss the "signs" they give or nothing at all.

I like number 5. "You own at least one slightly preppy or conservative outfit because you understand how to dress in civilized society and that it’s not always appropriate for people to have rips all over their clothing." I've seen people on city-data comment that they think Northeasterners "dress up" more for work and even everyday life than people on the West Coast in particular, but maybe than other regions, too. So this reminded me of that.
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Old 04-25-2015, 05:32 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,434 posts, read 18,347,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
What a joke. I have lived in all parts of CT, my entire life and what you say is just plain wrong.

The ONLY area of CT that legitimately feels like it's part of NYC suburbs is Fairfield County and a small portion of New Haven County. The Hartford area and New London County feel NOTHING like NYC...at all. The vast majority of CT residents do not live in the area of CT that feels like NYC, which is a small portion of the state. As soon as you cross the border from Fairfield into New Haven County, the vibe TOTALLY changes.
North or east of the I-91/I-95 interchange in New Haven has always been to me where New England begins. Consequently its also where I exhale, blood pressure goes down, and overall I feel more relaxed. It's funny those physiological barriers and idiosyncrasies. I-95 south of New Haven is solid NYC metro all the way in to the Bronx for me, and it's very palpable. That stretch of I-95 in Fairfield County must exist in hell. I can see your point of view, having grown up near Hartford which is definitely solid New England.
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