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Old 04-30-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: LoS ScAnDaLoUs KiLLa CaLI
1,227 posts, read 1,196,588 times
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This is a joke thread, right?

Here's a good start:

Wikipedia
Search for "Culture of ________"

If you still don't understand what the differences are, I don't know what to tell you.
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Old 04-30-2015, 02:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
These terms are not synonymous.

Hispanic: A person of Spanish descent. This includes people from the entire Spanish speaking-world, including Spain, but does not include people from countries like Haiti or Brazil.

Latin/Latino/Latina: One who is of Latin descent. This includes all Hispanics, plus French, Italian, Portuguese, French Canadian, Cajun, and Brazilian people as well.

Latin American: A Latino or Latina from the Americas. This includes Brazilians, Haitians, Cajuns, and Quebecois, but excludes Spaniards, Frenchmen, and Italians.

These statements are technically correct. Hence, I am speaking of Hispanics (Spanish speakers) who came from or their parents or grandparents came from the Western Hemisphere south of the United States (not from anywhere outside the Western Hemisphere).
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Old 04-30-2015, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
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The Latino/Hispanic culture is impossible to define because it encompasses so many different countries, races and ethnic groups.
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Old 04-30-2015, 03:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So this thread is 9 posts in and nobody's even bothered to answer the OP's question? What he's asking is pretty straightforward notwithstanding the fact we've nuanced the question to death: what are the cultural differences, if any, among Cubans, Mexicans, Peruvians, etc. I presume the OP specified "Spanish-speaking peoples" because there has been some argument in threads as to whether Brazilians or Haitians should be considered Latino/Hispanic.

I can only imagine the types of questions people at the Census have to deal with everyday....

Yes, I've seen self-identified Hispanics in New York City who will say "I like hanging out in Inwood (a neighborhood on the top edge of northern Manhattan) because I like that it is a loud and lively neighborhood and I like their type of dancing and music most and their women" or words to that effect. And then others will say "Well me, I prefer the hanging around the Colombians in Jackson Heights (Queens)". And then others will choose to be with the Puerto Rican population of East Harlem (or at least what used to be a significant Puerto Rican population in East Harlem). And so on and so on. That is, as Hispanics themselves, they don't all necessarily feel a commonality of interests, ways, and outlooks with other peoples just because these other peoples also speak Spanish and also come from Central America or the Caribbean or South America. What is the essence of these distinct differences that they see with one another (whereby they object to them all being lumped together into a "Hispanic" or "Latin American" mold that the overall American society and American media lumps them into)?

About the media, unless I am misinformed, I can't quite tell that the TV networks Univision and Telemundo cater to just one particular nationality group but rather seem to be oriented toward "Hispanic culture at-large" (that originates in the Western Hemisphere, not in Spain or elsewhere outside the Western Hemisphere). Is this a correct perception on my part?
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Old 04-30-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL
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There are a lot of cultural differences among the various Latin American populations: variations in the accent, and idiomatic expressions of each group, the cuisine, the music (there is a great deal of musical variation among the Latin American nations, tho there's also modern styles common to all), the political bent (e.g., politics of Cubans in the US being much different from Mexicans or Puerto Ricans), preferred sports (soccer or baseball?) etc. Generally, people from countries in the same area of Latin America (e.g, the Caribbean, the Andes, the Amazon) are going to feel more comfortable with the culture of other nations in the same area.

That being said, there are some commonalities that unite all, such as the language, religion (generally Roman Catholic with African or Indian influences), and Spanish language TV.
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Old 04-30-2015, 03:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapnTrips View Post
There are a lot of cultural differences among the various Latin American populations: variations in the accent, and idiomatic expressions of each group, the cuisine, the music (there is a great deal of musical variation among the Latin American nations, tho there's also modern styles common to all), the political bent (e.g., politics of Cubans in the US being much different from Mexicans or Puerto Ricans), preferred sports (soccer or baseball?) etc. Generally, people from countries in the same area of Latin America (e.g, the Caribbean, the Andes, the Amazon) are going to feel more comfortable with the culture of other nations in the same area.

That being said, there are some commonalities that unite all, such as the language, religion (generally Roman Catholic with African or Indian influences), and Spanish language TV.
Thank you for your illuminating answer, CapnTrips.
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Old 04-30-2015, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,513,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee;39433732[B
]So this thread is 9 posts in and nobody's even bothered to answer the OP's question[/b]? What he's asking is pretty straightforward notwithstanding the fact we've nuanced the question to death: what are the cultural differences, if any, among Cubans, Mexicans, Peruvians, etc. I presume the OP specified "Spanish-speaking peoples" because there has been some argument in threads as to whether Brazilians or Haitians should be considered Latino/Hispanic.

I can only imagine the types of questions people at the Census have to deal with everyday....
The question is too vague. There are too many differences to list between Mexicans from Oaxaca and Mexicans from Durango, let alone between Dominicans, Panamanians, and Argentines.

Latin America is extremely diverse. Parts of Central Mexico and Northern Colombia have been influenced by Arab culture (Shakira is an of Arab ancestry, for instance). Parts of Peru have been influenced by Chinese culture. The Caribbean is heavily influenced by African culture, whereas Africans have had virtually no influence on Chile at all. Some countries like Bolivia embrace their indigenous roots, while other countries like Argentina try to white-wash, hide, and stifle indigenous culture. Uruguay has been influenced more by Italian culture than Spanish culture. German immigrants have influenced the culture in Northern Mexico. Cuba's culture is unique because of its government and its relationship with the rest of the world. I could go on and on, but essentially South and Central America are just as culturally diverse as Europe.
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Old 04-30-2015, 06:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
The question is too vague. There are too many differences to list between Mexicans from Oaxaca and Mexicans from Durango, let alone between Dominicans, Panamanians, and Argentines.

Latin America is extremely diverse. Parts of Central Mexico and Northern Colombia have been influenced by Arab culture (Shakira is an of Arab ancestry, for instance). Parts of Peru have been influenced by Chinese culture. The Caribbean is heavily influenced by African culture, whereas Africans have had virtually no influence on Chile at all. Some countries like Bolivia embrace their indigenous roots, while other countries like Argentina try to white-wash, hide, and stifle indigenous culture. Uruguay has been influenced more by Italian culture than Spanish culture. German immigrants have influenced the culture in Northern Mexico. Cuba's culture is unique because of its government and its relationship with the rest of the world. I could go on and on, but essentially South and Central America are just as culturally diverse as Europe.

Now THIS is an informed, nuanced answer of depth and dimension that you provided here!

You know (speaking from the perspective of a Caucasian Jewish male of European ancestry), racially/ethnically speaking, many non-Hispanic peoples would think that the Spanish-speaking peoples who come from Central America, the Caribbean, and South America are of aboriginal/native/Amerindian backgrounds in their ancestry. And yet, I notice that when I watch Univision or Telemundo, for instance, so many of the actors, actresses, and other participants I see on their shows are hardly distinguishable (if at all) in their visual features and look from so many European-originated people (central, eastern, northern and southern European). That is, as to their skin tone, bone structure, dress or attire, styles, facial features, et al . . . although one will as well see other participants here and there that show characteristics more indicative or suggestive of being aboriginal/native/Amerindian in origin. It just goes to show that, simply because all these peoples from all the nations of Central America, the Caribbean, and South America speak a common language (Spanish) does not necessarily mesh them all together in the unidimensional way that the use of the terms "Hispanic" or "Latin/Latino" seem to suggest. As an example (beyond differences in culture and practices between many of them), I even noticed differences in appearances in terms of racial/ethnic features which I mentioned above. That is, for example, for so many of the actors and actresses, newscasters, show emcees (masters of ceremonies or introducers) and other participants on the TV shows that I see on Univision and Telemundo, I could just as well believe that they are from Germany or Denmark or Norway or Russia or Italy or Greece or the Czech Republic and so on in their visual look. Dawn.Davenport, in her quote above, said that "... countries like Argentina try to white-wash, hide, and stifle indigenous culture". That's not hard to believe.

Of course, some (or more than some) of these persons I see on Univision and Telemundo TV shows may be of mixed racial/ethnic origin (e.g., having parents who are mixed aboriginal/native/Amerindian and Anglo European and maybe even going back further generations than just their parents) and hence this is why they don't all necessarily visually resemble the racial/ethnic characteristics that one would typically find in those of pure Latin American/Caribbean indigenous background.

Last edited by UsAll; 04-30-2015 at 06:51 PM..
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Each Hispanic nation has it's own history and heritage. Mexicans, are mostly a mix of Spaniards who came there, and the Native Mexicans who they mostly raped back then. Argentinians tend to be of a heavy European stock. Cubans are a mix of White Europeans (Mostly Canarians and Spanish mainlanders), the descendants of African slaves, and mixed race folks.

The cultures vary because they were not all settled by the same people in the same time period and for the same reasons. I mean, they all have the roots from Spain, but just like the US, Jamaica and Australia are each very different in culture and demographics, so are the Hispanophonic nations.
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Old 05-01-2015, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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As far as the US Census is concerned, a Hispanic is a person who self identifies and self-declares as Hispanic. The census enumerator asks if you are Hispanic. If you say Yes, then you are Hispanic. If you say No, then you are not. The responses are never challenged, nor is any evidence requested in support of the declaration. The ensuing statistic, false and frivolous and vagueas it may be, is golden.

In every decennial census, the terms used are different, as the Census Bureau tries to run the gamut of outrage imposed by loud nitpickers. At one time, I recall, certain benefits (like college placemens) were extended to what were called "Spanish-surnamed Americans". If your dad was Garcia and your mom was Lundqvist, you could get a scholarship, but not the other way around.

France has taken the position that it illegal for any person to be formally asked about ethnicity. The census of France makes no mention of the racial, cultural or national heritage of any person enumerated. This has been the case for 40 years. France, once the world's most enlightened civilization, might still be.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-01-2015 at 07:29 AM..
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