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Old 04-30-2015, 01:08 AM
 
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Not sure what forum within C-D.com to place this thread within. I was going to place it in the “World” Forums, under the “Americas” sub-forum; then I thought of the “Great Debates” Forum (though it is not a debate I am seeking or starting . . . per se); then I thought of the “Politics and Other Controversies” (though it is not really a political question I am asking but rather a cultural or sociological or social psychological question); then I thought of the “Psychology” Forum. In the end, I am asking this question in this forum, for there doesn’t appear to be a particular forum devoted to or reasonably encompassing of discussing what might be called “Ethnicity” or “Intercultural Differences” (i.e., differences between different cultures or nationality groups).

My question(s) is about WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES IN CULTURE, THINKING, AND WAYS-OF-LIFE of the varied nationality populations that make up what in the United States is often called the “Hispanic” or “Latino” peoples (with my focus here being ONLY on those who are Spanish-speaking peoples)?

It has been said by many who are Spanish-speaking from Central America, Latin America, the Caribbean, or South America that using terms like “Hispanic” or “Latin/Latinos” to lump them ALL together into a common culture and mindset (like is often done in the United States at-large) is viewed by them as a kind of generalization or sweeping description for all folks from the lands south of the continental United States and that they don’t particularly like this or don’t refer to or think of themselves in this manner.

We in the United States often enough do the same thing with the peoples of sub-Saharan Africa (i.e., Black Africa) and the peoples of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Maldives, et al) and the peoples of East Asia (China, Taiwan, Mongolia, Japan, Vietnam, the Koreas, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma, et al), although it seems as though we tend to go to greater lengths to differentiate them from one-another. And we do well-enough differentiate between the Caucasian European peoples (British, Scottish, Irish, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Danes, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, Belgian, Italian, Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Russian, Greek, et al).

So the main question I have (just to educate myself to better understand the differences in culture, behavior, and practices or ways-of-thinking of the different Spanish-speaking peoples of the Americas (out of pure intellectual interest . . . with no agenda or anything else behind my question but just a sociological or social psychological type of scholarly interest) is: How would you describe the similarities and differences between the different Spanish-speaking peoples of the Western Hemisphere that distinguish them from one another most distinctly? That is, how would one recognize distinct differences in cultural practices and ways, music, diet, traditions, religion and belief systems, etc. etc. etc. that a person could recognize to say to themselves “Now that is Dominican and that is Mexican and that is Puerto Rican . . .” and so on?

For instance, I see others over the course of time within C-D.com speak of different neighborhoods within New York City (e.g., Inwood, Washington Heights, the different sub-neighborhoods within the greater South Bronx, Jackson Heights, Corona, etc.) or in other states (e.g., Florida, Arizona, Texas) or other cities (e.g., Chicago, Los Angeles) as being characterized as having a distinct character and makeup which they label as being representative or indicative of any one of the following Spanish-speaking peoples:

1) Dominican
2) Puerto Rican
3) Mexican
4) Columbian
5) Salvadorian
6) Costa Rican
7) Peruvian
8) Nicaraguan
9) Guatemalan
10) Cuban
11) Honduran
12) Panamanian
13) Venezuelan
14) Bolivian
15) Chilean
16) Ecuadorian
17) Paraguayan
18) Uruguayan

Or, when I watch a Spanish-language TV station in the United States such as Univision, is the overall content of that station representative of Spanish-speaking or Latino culture at-large? Or, instead, does it distinctly represent one particular group (such as one of those 18 Spanish-speaking nationality groups mentioned above)?

Please help me to understand the commonly-shared traits and cultures and then also the differences that distinguish these different Spanish-speaking nationality groups from one another. For each of them tend to ALL say that they are different and should not be lumped together into a common category such as “Hispanic” or “Latin/Latino” as a sweeping generalization for all of them.
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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What about non-Spanish speaking peoples of Hispanic/Latino descent?
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
What about non-Spanish speaking peoples of Hispanic/Latino descent?
As I said in my posting which started this thread, my only interest was in the so-called HISPANIC cultures of the Western Hemisphere nations who have populations residing in the United States (not those that speak Portuguese or French or other languages). Most often, even when, in America, we say "Latin" or "Latino", we virtually always imply "Spanish-speaking". (For instance, we don't think of Haitians, who speak their variation of French which they call Haitian Creole, as being "Hispanic".)
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
Most often, even when, in America, we say "Latin" or "Latino", we virtually always imply "Spanish-speaking".
The reason I ask is because 24% of Hispanic/Latino people in the U.S. don't speak Spanish at all.
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Old 04-30-2015, 01:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
The reason I ask is because 24% of Hispanic/Latino people in the U.S. don't speak Spanish at all.

But if they are called "Hispanic" (even if some of them or even many of them don't use that term amongst themselves but accept that the American culture and media at-large thinks of them in this way), then the origins of their culture/nationality is from a Spanish-speaking nation such as the 18 nations I mentioned in my first posting. Some of them were born and raised here and didn't embrace or wholly embrace making Spanish their main tongue but rather embraced or were raised to make English their primary (if not their only) spoken language. But the culture their parents or grandparents or whoever else earlier in their ancestral line came from what is euphemistically called "Hispanic" origins (i.e., Spanish-speaking culture).

As an illustrative example: On C-D.com (for instance, in the New York City Forum), you'll have people describe neighborhoods in whichever of the five boroughs or counties which make up New York City or nearby communities in the NYC metro area and they'll say "Oh, Inwood (upper Manhattan) is a mostly Dominican neighborhood" or "Jackson Heights (Queens) is mostly a Colombian neighborhood" or "Union City (a New Jersey city across the Hudson River from Manhattan) is mostly a Cuban enclave". And hence Puerto Ricans or Mexicans, for instance, will feel less inclined to live in those named locations and instead will want to live amongst otherPuerto Ricans or Mexicans, respectively. And yet Corona (Queens) is a majority Hispanic neighborhood consisting of Dominicans, Colombians, Ecuadorians, Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Bolivians, Peruvians, Mexicans, Venezuelans, and Chileans . . . who all decide that they can all live alongside one another, as though they feel they all share a common or complementary culture, mindset, music, diet, way-of-life, et al. These examples convey that, even amongst these "Hispanic" peoples themselves, some will find similarities or compatibilities to bring them to live and relate together and yet others amongst them will find differences between them and would seek or prefer to live and relate amongst others of their own nationality group and live in strong clusters of their own nationality group. WHY? What are these similarities and differences that both bring them together sometimes and yet drive them to be apart from one another sometimes?
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Old 04-30-2015, 02:24 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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Quote:
These examples convey that, even amongst these "Hispanic" peoples themselves, some will find similarities or compatibilities to bring them to live and relate together and yet others amongst them will find differences between them and would seek or prefer to live and relate amongst others of their own nationality group and live in strong clusters of their own nationality group. WHY? What are these similarities and differences that both bring them together sometimes and yet drive them to be apart from one another sometimes?
You didn't mention Spain.

I think you're overthinking it.

Language is obviously number one. Similar interests is number two. Where you see greater concentrations of a particular group, it's probably because that particular location is a "landing spot" for newly arrived immigrants from a particular location. A lot of times concentrations develop only out of some sort of familial situation, I knew tons of guys from Mexico (or even Guatemala or El Salvador) that came to Riverside, California simply because a cousin/uncle/etc said that "hay trabajo".

After high school, I hung out with a group of guys that included Mexicans raised in the U.S., Americans of Mexican descent, a Colombian, a Peruvian, and a couple of mixed White/Asian guys. What we all had in common? We all grew up in the same area, and/or went to school/work together.

To be honest, I don't think any Hispanic groups are self-segregating, they're just living in the areas that their means provide, in areas that are mostly going to be culturally acceptable for them. By the second generation this is less important, and isn't a factor at all by the third.
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Old 04-30-2015, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
As I said in my posting which started this thread, my only interest was in the so-called HISPANIC cultures of the Western Hemisphere nations who have populations residing in the United States (not those that speak Portuguese or French or other languages). Most often, even when, in America, we say "Latin" or "Latino", we virtually always imply "Spanish-speaking". (For instance, we don't think of Haitians, who speak their variation of French which they call Haitian Creole, as being "Hispanic".)
These terms are not synonymous.

Hispanic: A person of Spanish descent. This includes people from the entire Spanish speaking-world, including Spain, but does not include people from countries like Haiti or Brazil.

Latin/Latino/Latina: One who is of Latin descent. This includes all Hispanics, plus French, Italian, Portuguese, French Canadian, Cajun, and Brazilian people as well.

Latin American: A Latino or Latina from the Americas. This includes Brazilians, Haitians, Cajuns, and Quebecois, but excludes Spaniards, Frenchmen, and Italians.
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Old 04-30-2015, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
The reason I ask is because 24% of Hispanic/Latino people in the U.S. don't speak Spanish at all.
I think the OP is talking about people who still identify themselves as Hispanic because they still retain at least the non-English language (at home or among friends) that distinguishes them from the general population. It is also true that ~95% of Polish Americans don't speak Polish at all. But they also exhibit a nearly complete absence of any cultural characteristics that would differentiate them from the general population, except for maybe their surname and a couple of Babcia's recipes.

The OP's question is not unreasonable, and maybe a suitable approach would be to look at the differences in the cultures of Texas (Mexican), Florida (Cuban) and New York (Puerto Rican). At the same time, they are all still bound together as undifferentiated Hispancs by television, with Univision and Telemundo being America channels using the Spanish language, with shows produced in studios in the USA, without any preference for any Latin American country of cultural origin.
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Old 04-30-2015, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I think the OP is talking about people who still identify themselves as Hispanic because they still retain at least the non-English language (at home or among friends) that distinguishes them from the general population. It is also true that ~95% of Polish Americans don't speak Polish at all. But they also exhibit a nearly complete absence of any cultural characteristics that would differentiate them from the general population, except for maybe their surname and a couple of Babcia's recipes.
I think OP was trying to be more cut and dry about it, as if speaking Spanish in practice AND being from a particular country was all that made somebody Hispanic/Latino. If so, there are several hundred thousand people in (particularly) Colorado and New Mexico (with no country of origin other than this one) that I'd like OP to meet.
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Old 04-30-2015, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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So this thread is 9 posts in and nobody's even bothered to answer the OP's question? What he's asking is pretty straightforward notwithstanding the fact we've nuanced the question to death: what are the cultural differences, if any, among Cubans, Mexicans, Peruvians, etc. I presume the OP specified "Spanish-speaking peoples" because there has been some argument in threads as to whether Brazilians or Haitians should be considered Latino/Hispanic.

I can only imagine the types of questions people at the Census have to deal with everyday....
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