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View Poll Results: Best city in the U.S. to live on a boat?
Jacksonville, FL 1 2.86%
Houston/Galveston, TX 1 2.86%
Seattle, WA 5 14.29%
Tampa, FL 4 11.43%
San Francisco Bay Area, CA 0 0%
Norfolk, VA 0 0%
Portland, OR 1 2.86%
Gulfport, MS 0 0%
Portland, ME 0 0%
Boston, MA 3 8.57%
Providence/Newport, RI 0 0%
Baltimore/Annapolis, MD 3 8.57%
New Bern, NC 1 2.86%
Charleston, SC 0 0%
Daytona Beach, FL 0 0%
San Diego, CA 5 14.29%
Corpus Christi, TX 0 0%
Vero Beach, FL 1 2.86%
Oxnard, CA 0 0%
Atlantic City, NJ 0 0%
Miami, FL 3 8.57%
Houma, LA 0 0%
Fort, Myers, FL 1 2.86%
Other 2 5.71%
I wouldn't know 4 11.43%
Voters: 35. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-30-2015, 07:32 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,400 posts, read 2,283,570 times
Reputation: 920

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So this is something I've been wanting to do since I was 12 years old. To buy a boat and live on it at the docks/marina. Maybe take the boat out on the weekends/afternoons for some boating. It's alot cheaper to live too when compared to house or condo living. Have any of you ever tried this before? Know of any good cities to be a "liveaboard"?

I want to do something just like this...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLZo-wuZNuo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4EUVDB1Yftc

Thanks!
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Old 04-30-2015, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,510,289 times
Reputation: 2935
Given weather and docking fees (which can be extremely expensive), my guess would be someplace along the Gulf Coast like Mobile, Biloxi, Port Arthur, or Pensacola would be best. If you're not afraid of alligators, Florida has lots of lakes. A reservoir in Arizona could work, but even that might be chilly in the winter.
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:19 PM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,510,871 times
Reputation: 6606
Marina Del Rey, CA
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,242,541 times
Reputation: 1196
For places I know but weren't listed up there, Newport Harbor.
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Old 05-01-2015, 01:19 AM
 
Location: SGV
24,760 posts, read 9,643,702 times
Reputation: 9715
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Marina Del Rey, CA
Agreed.
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Old 05-01-2015, 06:44 AM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,321 posts, read 3,000,991 times
Reputation: 4110
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliguy92832 View Post
It's alot cheaper to live too when compared to house or condo living. Have any of you ever tried this before? Know of any good cities to be a "liveaboard"?
Um! ???? What?

Seriously though, boats, living, water and marinas combined have absolutely nothing to do with cheap as boats are a very expensive "hobby". Marinas aren't cheap, especially in desirable locations and many, though they may not have a problem with liveaboards, will not allow a boat to be docked there if it is in the condition it would be in which someone expects to be living for "cheap". Also marinas are usually quite proud of their electric and other services.

Now to add even more expenses, as you stated you would like to take it out which means you not only need a boat big enough to live on but also one in good enough condition mechanically to be able to leave the slip. Most of those places you list are on the ocean so your boat needs to be seaworthy as well if you want to venture outside the inlet. Now if you want to take it out on weekends and actually use it it will only be a matter of time before a motor or gear will go up and have to be rebuilt. The question is when as it's a boat and the guarantee is there.

Now there are lower budget marinas in assorted places but you won't be close to anything and you might be in a mosquito breeding ground. You see places like that scattered around the Chesapeake bay and I'm sure other locations as well. There is also the possibility of keeping a boat out on a mooring as well but that comes with it's own set of problems. For starters you need another smaller boat or you are stuck out there. Then constant generator running and the fuel to run it so you have power. And please keep watch on your boat and always make sure that your ground tackle is in PERFECT shape and the line is heavy enough for your size boat in a storm. It's better to have another anchor and line as well. I'm stating this because it's the boats out "on the hook" that always cause the problems to marinas and other vessels when a storm comes as they break free and wreck everything in their path. Most of those vessels are out there because their owners are trying to cheap out and save some money so they cheapen out on everything else as well and don't take care of their boat or what is holding it in place. Recipe for disaster.

Now my thoughts on this are going to be based on my experience on newer sportfishers in the 60/65 ft range. And trust me, even a 65ft sportfish can get quite small while living on it and those dockside (expensive) bars/restaurants can be quite inviting when they are only a few slips away and you have no transportation. So, there goes even more money. Lots!

I'm not trying to scare away, just stating things. I have "lived" on boats (4 month's or more), stayed on boats, traveled all over on them as I've made a career out of it as even though I don't own one, I have gotten the use of many while being employed on them. I love them and the lifestyle that goes with it, however, even if I had the money, I wouldn't consider owning anything bigger then a mid-20ft center console as I see the expenses of just maintaining a larger vessel.
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Old 05-01-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,400 posts, read 2,283,570 times
Reputation: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
For places I know but weren't listed up there, Newport Harbor.
Yeah...

Johnson: What is it like to live on a boat in Newport Harbor? - The Orange County Register
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Old 05-01-2015, 01:14 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,400 posts, read 2,283,570 times
Reputation: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Marina Del Rey, CA
Or Ventura, Long Beach...

Drop anchor, you're home - latimes
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Old 05-01-2015, 01:17 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,400 posts, read 2,283,570 times
Reputation: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Um! ???? What?

Seriously though, boats, living, water and marinas combined have absolutely nothing to do with cheap as boats are a very expensive "hobby". Marinas aren't cheap, especially in desirable locations and many, though they may not have a problem with liveaboards, will not allow a boat to be docked there if it is in the condition it would be in which someone expects to be living for "cheap". Also marinas are usually quite proud of their electric and other services.

Now to add even more expenses, as you stated you would like to take it out which means you not only need a boat big enough to live on but also one in good enough condition mechanically to be able to leave the slip. Most of those places you list are on the ocean so your boat needs to be seaworthy as well if you want to venture outside the inlet. Now if you want to take it out on weekends and actually use it it will only be a matter of time before a motor or gear will go up and have to be rebuilt. The question is when as it's a boat and the guarantee is there.

Now there are lower budget marinas in assorted places but you won't be close to anything and you might be in a mosquito breeding ground. You see places like that scattered around the Chesapeake bay and I'm sure other locations as well. There is also the possibility of keeping a boat out on a mooring as well but that comes with it's own set of problems. For starters you need another smaller boat or you are stuck out there. Then constant generator running and the fuel to run it so you have power. And please keep watch on your boat and always make sure that your ground tackle is in PERFECT shape and the line is heavy enough for your size boat in a storm. It's better to have another anchor and line as well. I'm stating this because it's the boats out "on the hook" that always cause the problems to marinas and other vessels when a storm comes as they break free and wreck everything in their path. Most of those vessels are out there because their owners are trying to cheap out and save some money so they cheapen out on everything else as well and don't take care of their boat or what is holding it in place. Recipe for disaster.

Now my thoughts on this are going to be based on my experience on newer sportfishers in the 60/65 ft range. And trust me, even a 65ft sportfish can get quite small while living on it and those dockside (expensive) bars/restaurants can be quite inviting when they are only a few slips away and you have no transportation. So, there goes even more money. Lots!

I'm not trying to scare away, just stating things. I have "lived" on boats (4 month's or more), stayed on boats, traveled all over on them as I've made a career out of it as even though I don't own one, I have gotten the use of many while being employed on them. I love them and the lifestyle that goes with it, however, even if I had the money, I wouldn't consider owning anything bigger then a mid-20ft center console as I see the expenses of just maintaining a larger vessel.
Thanks. You have some good points!
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Old 01-16-2018, 05:19 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,253 times
Reputation: 10
Default Colorado living on a boat regulations. ...

Does anyone know the laws surounding Colorado living on a boat?
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