U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-02-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,412,150 times
Reputation: 36095

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Just because you never saw one does not mean they do not exist in those States.
Who said they did not exist.

Go and tell Mr. OP that it is way too dangerous to drive through Arizona, find a route that goes around the state so you can avoid all the rattlesnakes. They can get into your car, you know. Or be lying in wait when you step out the door. Under toilet seats. We know all about rattlesnakes, and we always plan very carefully not to risk our lives driving through rattlesnake country. Not to mention gila monsters, and tarantulas that can carry away small kittens and puppies, and probably school children for all we know. And flash floods out of the blue washing away hundreds of cars in an arroyo, from a rainstorm a hundred miles away. And the heat -- sit in a closed car in an Arizona mall parking lot for 30 seconds and you'll die a slow painful death. And all those narcoterrorists leaking in from nearby Mexico, kidnapping and slaughtering everybody near the border, hacking them to pieces. There was a thread a couple of days ago from a woman who was warned by AAA not to even think about driving I-10 because it goes too close to Mexico. Nothing will strike terror in the heart of a tabloid-educated American like the word Mexico. Or rattlesnake. Or Sheriff Joe.

Just because you've never seen them doesn't mean they don't exist.

Actually, mid westerners love the tornado image. It's a great deterrent, it keeps the idiots from passing through, better than speed bumps.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-02-2015 at 09:11 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-02-2015, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,050,332 times
Reputation: 3600
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
No, it is more likely they had to pull over because they actually saw with their own eyes the tornado, you know, that dark, looming, huge funnel cloud.
Most of them also happen to live in an area that has at times 120MPH straight line winds so they do actually know the difference between wind and tornado.

I happen to know these truckers I speak of personally and one of them is my Husband so I am fairly certain they know more about what they encountered than you or I do since they are the ones who were actually participating in the encounter and lived to say that they did.

PS ~~ A few of them have photos of these events as well and the photos lived to tell the story in addition to the trucker.
Witnessing a tornado is a lot different than being caught in a tornado. It's easy to see a tornado at a safe distance (though safe is relative if you don't know where it's going as well as the other hazards involved in a storm). It's easy to avoid a tornado when often times there are warnings many minutes in advance either on the radio or through an area's local sirens. Literally, you have to make an effort to drive into a tornado or just be completely oblivious to your surroundings.

For OP, it's still a low-chance event and it's pretty pointless to avoid a state for the sole purpose of believing that it reduces their chances of driving into severe storms.

Had the OP planned their route a little later and the forecasted weather for Kansas during mid-May called for a confirmed chance of severe storms, then maybe it would make sense to drive away from the storms by going a different route. But as of right now, the forecasts which only extend out to 2 weeks from today say it will be mostly sunny and it will make no difference to the OP which route they take.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2015, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,412,150 times
Reputation: 36095
Let's end this foolishness once and for all. The OP is NOT going to see a tornado, or have to divert the trip because of one, nor get caught in one, nor get killed by one. It is just plain ignorant to pre-plan a trip with the assumption that you will have to dodge between tornadoes. Ignorant of the dynamics of North American weather, of simple statistical probability, and of common sense.

A driver going cross country is 100 times more likely to be killed by a drunk driver, than by a tornado.

The area of the lower 48 is 3-million square miles, let's say you are scared to drive through one third of it, a milllion sq-mi. A typical tornado cuts a path a few hundred yard wide, several miles long, lets be generous and say a quarter of a square mile. Say there are 100 tornadoes every year, that's 25 square miles affected. One chance in 40,000 that any point will be hit. There are 200 days in the tornado season, and you spend four days driving thrgouth. One chance in 50 you will be there that day to experience a 1:40,000 event, or once chance in two million. A tornado lasts about five minutes, so you are only at that point for 1/300 of the day that you and the tornado will intersect, if there is one that day, at that place. That's one chance in 600 million that a casual tourist will be hit by a tornado. Even if no warning is issued and you don't see this fairly conspicuous object and try to take evasive action, even then, blundering blindly, the odds are a half a billilon to one in your favor..

Last edited by jtur88; 05-02-2015 at 05:08 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2015, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,632 posts, read 3,747,324 times
Reputation: 4205
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Let's end this foolishness once and for all. The OP is NOT going to see a tornado, or have to divert the trip because of one, nor get caught in one, nor get killed by one. It is just plain ignorant to pre-plan a trip with the assumption that you will have to dodge between tornadoes. Ignorant of the dynamics of North American weather, of simple statistical probability, and of common sense.

A driver going cross country is 100 times more likely to be killed by a drunk driver, than by a tornado.

The area of the lower 48 is 3-million square miles, let's say you are scared to drive through one third of it, a milllion sq-mi. A typical tornado cuts a path a few hundred yard wide, several miles long, lets be generous and say a quarter of a square mile. Say there are 100 tornadoes every year, that's 25 square miles affected. One chance in 40,000 that any point will be hit. There are 200 days in the tornado season, and you spend four days driving thrgouth. One chance in 50 you will be there that day to experience a 1:40,000 event, or once chance in two million. A tornado lasts about five minutes, so you are only at that point for 1/300 of the day that you and the tornado will intersect, if there is one that day, at that place. That's one chance in 600 million that a casual tourist will be hit by a tornado. Even if no warning is issued and you don't see this fairly conspicuous object and try to take evasive action, even then, blundering blindly, the odds are a half a billilon to one in your favor..
Totally agreed. The chances you will run into a tornado are almost nil. Even if you do, just listen or watch the warnings and change your course. It's pretty simple, almost all tornadoes in this part of the country move west to east or southwest to northeast.

You didn't say which part of Illinois you are going to but I would generally choose I-40 (north of Phoenix), to I-35, then I-70 into Illinois. This would be the best plan for Illinois.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2015, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,416 posts, read 21,974,288 times
Reputation: 33726
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
No, it is more likely they had to pull over because they actually saw with their own eyes the tornado, you know, that dark, looming, huge funnel cloud.
Most of them also happen to live in an area that has at times 120MPH straight line winds so they do actually know the difference between wind and tornado.

I happen to know these truckers I speak of personally and one of them is my Husband so I am fairly certain they know more about what they encountered than you or I do since they are the ones who were actually participating in the encounter and lived to say that they did.

PS ~~ A few of them have photos of these events as well and the photos lived to tell the story in addition to the trucker.
BRAAAAWK! probably not even real tornadoes anyways and they sound more like itty bitty landspouts
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2015, 03:15 PM
 
814 posts, read 940,307 times
Reputation: 966
If you're serious about the "adventure" part, go check the "avoid highways" box in Google Maps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top