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Old 05-14-2015, 09:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
Can't vouch for its accuracy there. It is from a reputable source (Washington Post). It's definitely correct when it puts Philadelphia's and South Jersey's dialect within the North Midland region.
This. Just because some nay-sayers don't want Philly and South Jersey to be in the same linguistic region as many parts of Ohio doesn't make it any less so. Chicago's accent is like Rochester's. Now does that make me mad? Why should it?

 
Old 05-14-2015, 10:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
This. Just because some nay-sayers don't want Philly and South Jersey to be in the same linguistic region as many parts of Ohio doesn't make it any less so. Chicago's accent is like Rochester's. Now does that make me mad? Why should it?
The accents are different. People in that vast region of the map don't sound the same. Philadelphia has its own accent and it spills into South Jersey and the surrounding PA area. Those people don't sound the same as someone in like, Nebraska. Hard to tell what states are what on that map due to the lack of boundaries…
 
Old 05-15-2015, 04:22 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
The accents are different. People in that vast region of the map don't sound the same. Philadelphia has its own accent and it spills into South Jersey and the surrounding PA area. Those people don't sound the same as someone in like, Nebraska. Hard to tell what states are what on that map due to the lack of boundaries…
Of course we don't sound exactly the same. That isn't the point. There are differences between all the dialects of each region. However, the groupings (e.g., Philadelphia within the North Midland) are still valid. That this region has a Midland dialect is supported by linguists. Also, the Midland dialect region does more than "spill over" into South Jersey. It's the natural dialect here. I'd be willing to wager I'd have a harder time telling that someone is from Nebraska versus Northeastern NJ.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 04:50 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
This. Just because some nay-sayers don't want Philly and South Jersey to be in the same linguistic region as many parts of Ohio doesn't make it any less so.
Exactly. And it's extremely ridiculous and annoying. Many people probably base their impression of the Philadelphia accent on Rocky. That ignores the fact that it was a NY accent. Nothing to do with Philadelphia and easily distinguishable from it.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 08:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
Exactly. And it's extremely ridiculous and annoying. Many people probably base their impression of the Philadelphia accent on Rocky. That ignores the fact that it was a NY accent. Nothing to do with Philadelphia and easily distinguishable from it.
I think a few Philadelphians on city data wish they were New Yorkers. I've heard it said that "the Philly dialect is SO much like New York's!" here very often. You don't get that attitude in Philly, though. They have their own thing and are proud.

Some people have this weird idea that there's an "East Coast" dialect. It is true East Coast accents share qualities. But really, the only features many East Coast dialects share is the remnants of British English in their "aw" sounds and their non-usage of the letter R in the end of words. But the Atlantic Midland region only maintains the "aw" sound and is strongly rhotic. Another feature shared by a lot of East Coasters is the "O" sound that also sounds British in the pronunciation of home like "heh-ohm" or phone like "phe-own". This goes from Florida all the way up to North Central Jersey and stops once you get to the NYC metro and further North. It's also heard in most of Pennsylvania except Scranton. So, really, there isn't THAT much consistency across the East Coast except for non-rhoticity which was never used in Philly or Baltimore speech. Even in those regions, Blacks (which are non-rhotic in many areas) are highly rhotic as evidence by the way the say "here and there" as "heerr n derr" and Baltimore as "Bawldamorr". Elsewhere in the East Coast, people would say those "heeyah" and "the-ah" or "Bawltimaw".

Last edited by EddieOlSkool; 05-15-2015 at 09:11 AM..
 
Old 05-15-2015, 10:18 AM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,597,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I think a few Philadelphians on city data wish they were New Yorkers. I've heard it said that "the Philly dialect is SO much like New York's!" here very often. You don't get that attitude in Philly, though. They have their own thing and are proud.

Some people have this weird idea that there's an "East Coast" dialect. It is true East Coast accents share qualities. But really, the only features many East Coast dialects share is the remnants of British English in their "aw" sounds and their non-usage of the letter R in the end of words. But the Atlantic Midland region only maintains the "aw" sound and is strongly rhotic. Another feature shared by a lot of East Coasters is the "O" sound that also sounds British in the pronunciation of home like "heh-ohm" or phone like "phe-own". This goes from Florida all the way up to North Central Jersey and stops once you get to the NYC metro and further North. It's also heard in most of Pennsylvania except Scranton. So, really, there isn't THAT much consistency across the East Coast except for non-rhoticity which was never used in Philly or Baltimore speech. Even in those regions, Blacks (which are non-rhotic in many areas) are highly rhotic as evidence by the way the say "here and there" as "heerr n derr" and Baltimore as "Bawldamorr". Elsewhere in the East Coast, people would say those "heeyah and the-ah" or "Bawltimaw".
You are a idiot. Of course certain cities on the up and down east coast have their own dialect. Boston has it's own, Philly has it's own, NYC has its own, Baltimore has its own, the Carolinas has its own etc. Now you on the other try so hard to align yourself with NYC and other northeastern cities. You constantly try to align the Chicago accent with the NYC accent which is delusional because the Chicago accent sounds VERY different from the NYC accent. And now you're trying to align the Cincinnati accent with the Philly accent which is hilarious because they also sound very different from each other. You constantly make northeastern centric posts and threads even though you're from the Midwest. You want to be from from the Northeast so bad it's not even funny.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I think a few Philadelphians on city data wish they were New Yorkers. I've heard it said that "the Philly dialect is SO much like New York's!" here very often. You don't get that attitude in Philly, though. They have their own thing and are proud.
I've never met a person from Philadelphia or South Jersey who wants to be a New Yorker. I've known far more people who are generally antipathetic to New York and everything about it. I'm sure such people do exist, but in relatively small numbers, no doubt. Philadelphians definitely have their own thing and are proud of it.

Quote:
Some people have this weird idea that there's an "East Coast" dialect.
It's a weird notion. Accents differ considerably up and down the East Coast, from various Southern dialects in the South, to the Mid-Atlantic (here), North Jersey, New York, New England.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 02:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post

It's a weird notion. Accents differ considerably up and down the East Coast, from various Southern dialects in the South, to the Mid-Atlantic (here), North Jersey, New York, New England.
While I agree with your larger point, no one (or at least almost no one) considers the coastal Southeast to be "the East Coast". That phrase, for all intents and purposes, means the Bos-Wash corridor.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 02:37 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
And now you're trying to align the Cincinnati accent with the Philly accent which is hilarious because they also sound very different from each other.
Do you dispute the fact that both are North Midland dialects? Actual linguists who study this topic have made this determination. On the other hand, some people think the Philadelphia dialect is merely an extension of the New York one, which is extremely misinformed. Philadelphians are easily distinguishable from New Yorkers as well. Yet am I to assume you are purporting a closer connection between the Philadelphia accent & the New York one compared to Philadelphia-Cincinnati?
 
Old 05-15-2015, 02:38 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,514,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
While I agree with your larger point, no one (or at least almost no one) considers the coastal Southeast to be "the East Coast". That phrase, for all intents and purposes, means the Bos-Wash corridor.
The first time I ever experienced this odd attitude regarding the East Coast was here on CD, and only here since. The East Coast goes from ME to FL. It's split from there into Northeast and generally the South (though the South encompasses more than just the coastal southern states). Someone from Georgia will say they're from the South, someone from New York will say they're from the Northeast but they're both still from the East Coast.
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