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Old 06-03-2015, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,282 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11739

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Ah, so you haven't. I expected this. Just saying, a list of stats will never, ever trump the actual feel of a place. Cleveland is very much Midwestern, and echoes other Midwestern cities far more than Northeastern ones.
The "feel" of a place is subjective. History and demographics? Not really. I have been to Cleveland, never lived there or spent any amount of considerable time there, but it didn't "feel" much different from Pittsburgh.

My point was that the same arguments for making Baltimore or DC "northeastern" could also be made for Cleveland. I mean, I can't remember the last time someone has said that Philadelphia has a "pace still of the South." So if Baltimore (or Pittsburgh for that matter) don't feel much like Philadelphia, and they can be "Northeastern," then I don't see why Cleveland couldn't be (according to the logic of some folks on C-D).

 
Old 06-03-2015, 11:51 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Ah, so you haven't. I expected this. Just saying, a list of stats will never, ever trump the actual feel of a place. Cleveland is very much Midwestern, and echoes other Midwestern cities far more than Northeastern ones.

I don't feel like raising the ever-tiresome Baltimore - south, northeast, or traaaaansition folks? - argument. Ever. Again. Also, it's a red herring - have you spent actual time in Cleveland? If so, did you honestly feel it was more a Northeastern city than a Midwestern one? Why?
I've been to Cleveland and it reminds me of Chicago. But, only because of crime, a large ghetto, and overall lack of feeling safe. Also saw the house from A Christmas Story but that's its own thing.

When I went to Philly I wouldn't say I felt the same way as I did in New York. New York was LIGHTS, PEOPLE, MORE PEOPLE, AHHH HOW DO I EVEN MOVE WITHOUT STEPPING ON SOMEONE, AND HOLY S H I T TIMES SQUARE IS ALIVE EVEN AT THREE AM.

Philly was more of a feel of "what a neat and interesting city". Nice people, plenty of parking, stuff is cheap, food is amazing, and South Street reminded me of Milwaukee Avenue in Wicker Park back home in Chicago.

When I was in Pittsburgh (my grandmother lives there so I go a lot), I get the feel of honestly, a mountain town of beer drinkers, huge sports fanatics, and people who will run you off the road not because they're in a hurry to go somewhere, but because the winding steep roads just cause that. Pittsburgh reminds me of no other city. It has a blue collar feel all of its own and an attitude of isolation and sometimes kind of insular. But the people are all very friendly and definitely can talk your ear off if given the chance.

Sorry, I don't see where this going. All cities have a different feel even if they're in the same geographic region. I feel like cities along the Ohio have more in common with each other, honestly. Louisville to me feels more like Pittsburgh than Philly does. And no, I don't think this makes Pittsburgh Southern or Louisville Northeastern.

Cleveland to me is a lot like Chicago, but I feel it's only because of negatives. There's much less to do and honestly I wouldn't find it very fun.

What is a Northeastern feel, anyway? Having been to Boston, New York, and Philly I will say there isn't much in common in terms of how I feel in each city. Neither feels like the other. Pittsburgh feels even less like any of these places.
 
Old 06-03-2015, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,282 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11739
Out of curiosity, though, how does Pittsburgh feel like a "Northeastern" city? A lot of my HS friends went to either Pitt or C-M and none of them describe the two cities as being similar.
 
Old 06-03-2015, 12:02 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
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Grand Rapids is a quintessential Rust Belt city of the Great Lakes and it feels more like Pittsburgh than it does Chicago. Interestingly though I think it feels like Pittsburgh it doesn't feel like Louisville. I think Grand Rapids feels like a more restrained version of Pittsburgh, and Louisville feels like Pittsburgh went all out and started shooting up the place. If this makes no sense to you, well this is why these talks are HIGHLY subjective.
 
Old 06-03-2015, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,282 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11739
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
What is a Northeastern feel, anyway? Having been to Boston, New York, and Philly I will say there isn't much in common in terms of how I feel in each city. Neither feels like the other. Pittsburgh feels even less like any of these places.
That's the problem with trying to make the Northeast into something more than a strictly geographically-defined region.

I've heard some Pittsburgh posters claim that Pittsburgh has more in common with Philly than it does with Cleveland. I've always been a bit skeptical of that claim. They both have a lot of Italians and rowhouses, I guess. But they're even very different on the rowhouse front--only 8% of structures are detached in Philly compared to 44% in Pittsburgh. So what else do they have in common aside from being located in the same state?
 
Old 06-03-2015, 12:09 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Out of curiosity, though, how does Pittsburgh feel like a "Northeastern" city? A lot of my HS friends went to either Pitt or C-M and none of them describe the two cities as being similar.
Philadelphians wonder the same thing about their hill cousins. They wonder "how are we even in the same state?" at times. Interestingly, some feel Pittsburgh is more like Baltimore than it is like Philadelphia. Pittsburgh in my "feels" defies any regional classification. It's sort of like a Chicago meets West Virginia feel but with less country and more hipsters.
 
Old 06-03-2015, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,282 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11739
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Grand Rapids is a quintessential Rust Belt city of the Great Lakes and it feels more like Pittsburgh than it does Chicago. Interestingly though I think it feels like Pittsburgh it doesn't feel like Louisville. I think Grand Rapids feels like a more restrained version of Pittsburgh, and Louisville feels like Pittsburgh went all out and started shooting up the place. If this makes no sense to you, well this is why these talks are HIGHLY subjective.
What does Pittsburgh "feel" like? This is what I've gathered from classmates who went to school there (there were many).

-It's slow
-Transit is even worse than it is in Philly
-There aren't many Black people or Hispanics
-It's more conservative and "down home" than Philly
 
Old 06-03-2015, 12:11 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
13,365 posts, read 7,044,164 times
Reputation: 4865
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I've been to Cleveland and it reminds me of Chicago. But, only because of crime, a large ghetto, and overall lack of feeling safe. Also saw the house from A Christmas Story but that's its own thing.

When I went to Philly I wouldn't say I felt the same way as I did in New York. New York was LIGHTS, PEOPLE, MORE PEOPLE, AHHH HOW DO I EVEN MOVE WITHOUT STEPPING ON SOMEONE, AND HOLY S H I T TIMES SQUARE IS ALIVE EVEN AT THREE AM.

Philly was more of a feel of "what a neat and interesting city". Nice people, plenty of parking, stuff is cheap, food is amazing, and South Street reminded me of Milwaukee Avenue in Wicker Park back home in Chicago.

When I was in Pittsburgh (my grandmother lives there so I go a lot), I get the feel of honestly, a mountain town of beer drinkers, huge sports fanatics, and people who will run you off the road not because they're in a hurry to go somewhere, but because the winding steep roads just cause that. Pittsburgh reminds me of no other city. It has a blue collar feel all of its own and an attitude of isolation and sometimes kind of insular. But the people are all very friendly and definitely can talk your ear off if given the chance.

Sorry, I don't see where this going. All cities have a different feel even if they're in the same geographic region. I feel like cities along the Ohio have more in common with each other, honestly. Louisville to me feels more like Pittsburgh than Philly does. And no, I don't think this makes Pittsburgh Southern or Louisville Northeastern.

Cleveland to me is a lot like Chicago, but I feel it's only because of negatives. There's much less to do and honestly I wouldn't find it very fun.

What is a Northeastern feel, anyway? Having been to Boston, New York, and Philly I will say there isn't much in common in terms of how I feel in each city. Neither feels like the other. Pittsburgh feels even less like any of these places.
I've never been to Pittsburgh, but I think I would like it. Certainly more than Philadelphia. Despite the obligatory loyalty to the Flyers and the natural hatred for the Penguins that I feel, I think it would be more to my liking. I love most of Pennsylvania, not including Philadelphia. I love the mountain areas. Despite not being much of a city person in general, I could see myself liking Pittsburgh. The people seem like they would be nicer in Pittsburgh. The rest of PA feels nothing like Philadelphia, so I have no doubt Pittsburgh is quite distinct as well.

You're absolutely right that there's no single, unifying Northeastern vibe.
 
Old 06-03-2015, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,282 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11739
Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
You're absolutely right that there's no single, unifying Northeastern vibe.
But all of the posts on C-D data point to a consensus.

-Extremely liberal
-Dense, transit oriented urban environments
-Moolah
-Prestige (Ivy League, country clubs, Nantucket, etc.)
-Fast paced ("Outta my way!")
-Very educated White people

Those are the Big Six. Of course, San Francisco fits nearly all of the criteria, but that city tends to be written off since it's on the West Coast and has a "West Coast" vibe which I imagine is pretty similar to the vibe in Buddhist temple.
 
Old 06-03-2015, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,106 posts, read 13,514,630 times
Reputation: 5788
Whole lotta feeling going on in this thread.
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