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Old 10-17-2015, 02:19 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,844,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icemodeled View Post
Western Ohio is nothing like the NE. Also, I have never heard Dayton locals say it 'dayon'.. Not at all. Maybe they were drunk if you ever heard it. Anyways, at least for western Ohio natives, there are no accents that come close to the northeastern speech including NJ or NY. Big, big difference. To me, distance doesn't have much to do with it but rather culture and the social differences. I cannot say much about eastern Ohio, maybe it is different I am not sure, only speaking for more central and western area. I much more identify it with the Midwest then NE.

Why so many of these threads..
Cincy and Philly share similar accents. Your comment about "no similarities" is off. Even Southeastern Pennsylvania and Central/South Jersey dialects are more like Ohioan ones than they are like NY accents (of any region of NYS). So in that way, PA is kind of an outlier in the Northeast rather than Ohio being an outlier in the Midwest.

Forgetting about PA, one odd quirk of the Cincy accent is that like NY, short a's can be pronounced in different ways. This makes at least the Cincy area accent unique in its Midwest location, as the only other cities that have a similar split short a system are NYC, Philly, Baltimore, and New Orleans.

What I mean by this is that across America, short a words like "cat" are pronounced with a lax short a. In the far North cities, every a is tensed so it sounds like "keeuht". Most Americans tense the short a before the letters n or m. So man is "meean" and lamb is "leeam". But in NYC, while most short a's are tense, a few are lax. So Gary in NYC becomes "Gah-ree" wheread most Americans would say "Gary" and in Northern Ohio near Cleveland they'd say "Geeary". In this way Cincy is similar to NYC and Philly. Keep in mind most of Pennsylvania and Ohio are both in mostly Midland dialect territories. Like Pennsylvania, only Northeast Ohio near Cleveland people speak in Northern dialects. Ohio and Pennsylvania speak in more "neutral" accents like what is spoken in most of Jersey outside the NYC metro area. Yet despite this, features of New York's accent have made their way to Cincy. Could this be due to Ohio being a former extension of the Northeast? Maybe.

In fact, you mention Western Ohio as very different but it's the only Midwest city with this similar to NYC accent trait.

Keep in mind my OP was mostly satire. I just find it ridiculous how everyone wants to be in club Northeast, yet Ohioans (who mostly don't consider themselves Northeastern), share more in common with the Northeast than all these wannabes. Ohio also has heavy amounts of "Northeast" ethnic groups like Jews, Italians, Irish, and Puerto Ricans.

 
Old 10-17-2015, 08:35 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,542,021 times
Reputation: 18436
No, Ohio belongs in the Midwest.

The Northeast has a distinct flavor, which Ohio does NOT resemble.
 
Old 10-17-2015, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,734,481 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexusNexus View Post
No, Ohio belongs in the Midwest.

The Northeast has a distinct flavor, which Ohio does NOT resemble.
I'm sorry but parts of Ohio do.
 
Old 10-17-2015, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Canada
325 posts, read 295,156 times
Reputation: 536
Ohio is the Midwest. The northeast is from Washington DC to the Canadian border.
 
Old 10-17-2015, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,734,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modernrebel View Post
Ohio is the Midwest. The northeast is from Washington DC to the Canadian border.
You are aware that Ohio borders Canada too, yes? I'm not arguing that it isn't midwestern but to say it bears absolutely zero resemblance to its eastern neighbors is willfully ignorant at best.
 
Old 10-17-2015, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Canada
325 posts, read 295,156 times
Reputation: 536
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
You are aware that Ohio borders Canada too, yes? I'm not arguing that it isn't midwestern but to say it bears absolutely zero resemblance to its eastern neighbors is willfully ignorant at best.
Cookieskoon can you show me where I said that "it bears absolutely zero resemblance to it's eastern neighbours"?
 
Old 10-17-2015, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,734,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modernrebel View Post
Cookieskoon can you show me where I said that "it bears absolutely zero resemblance to it's eastern neighbours"?
No, please don't misunderstand. I wasn't accusing you of saying that; I tend to type in the same way I speak. Imagine if we were all standing face to face, that comment would've been aimed at multiple people involved.

I did not intend for that to be aimed at you. I am still much more accustomed to "meet space" conversation than I am internet forums.
 
Old 10-17-2015, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
469 posts, read 417,562 times
Reputation: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Eastern Ohio has many similarities to western PA and western NY and northern WV.

In that regard it feels more northeastern-northern Appalachian. Honestly though, once you get west/north of the hills and out of Cleveland Ohio is clearly more typical of the Midwest.
Calling northern WV the "northeast" is a bit of a stretch IMO. People/culture here aren't very similar to what you find in NY/NJ/MA/CT etc. Western PA yes, but that area in itself is somewhat of a gray area so to speak when it comes to clear cut regionalisms.
 
Old 10-17-2015, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,734,481 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by wvtraveler View Post
Calling northern WV the "northeast" is a bit of a stretch IMO. People/culture here aren't very similar to what you find in NY/NJ/MA/CT etc. Western PA yes, but that area in itself is somewhat of a gray area so to speak when it comes to clear cut regionalisms.
It really depends on where you personally come from. The part of NY I live in is much, much more similar to western PA and northern WV than it is the rest of NY state. In fact it's a pretty popular topic at times.

I do know though that a lot people will not accept that due to some bias or having no personal experience in this area.

I've been around Wheeling and down to Morgantown and Fairview quite a bit. I have some friends in the area, actually. I've also got a good bit of experience with the Pittsburgh area and southeast Ohio. I can say without a doubt that Many people from my home area of NY are exactly the same sort you'd find down there. The topography isn't much different either. We're sort of unsung in this regard. Very much hopelessly overshadowed by the bigger regions of NY. Not the least bit, NYC.

You might be surprised at how many upstaters there are who will identify with Appalachia if asked. We aren't asked an awful lot though.

For an example, if you explore around the Watkins Glen racetrack, typically west of it, you'd absolutely find us.

Usually the people who say no aren't originally from this area of the state.

I have personally brought some southern friends up here to see for themselves a few times. A Virginian, a Louisianian, one from Kentucky and three Texans so far.

My old friend Steven was from lowland Virginia. His reaction was my favorite. He was floored at how "not New York" it was, as he put it.

Some folks from the Shenandoah valley came up to the winery I work at today; crazy coincidence we were discussing this very topic.
 
Old 10-18-2015, 01:00 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,330 posts, read 19,542,021 times
Reputation: 18436
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Eastern Ohio has many similarities to western PA and western NY and northern WV.

In that regard it feels more northeastern-northern Appalachian. Honestly though, once you get west/north of the hills and out of Cleveland Ohio is clearly more typical of the Midwest.
I didn't find this to be the case. It takes more than hills to feel northeastern.
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