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Old 10-19-2015, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726

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"You'se" probably corresponds with large Italian-American concentrations.

New York - 2,631,024
Philadelphia - 835,952
Boston - 670,069
Chicago - 625,611
Los Angeles - 401,034
Pittsburgh - 393,674
Miami - 317,995
Detroit - 269,221
Washington - 267,351
Providence - 250,160
San Francisco - 237,800
Tampa - 213,251
Cleveland - 198,967
New Haven - 182,313
Baltimore - 159,976
Atlanta - 152,726

 
Old 10-20-2015, 11:12 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,732,432 times
Reputation: 30796
I am firmly in the 'Ohio is 100% Midwest' camp.

However, Eddie's comments on Cincinnati's accent being Midland and very similar to Philly is spot on. People here sound very similar to SE Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey even.

Most people think everyone in Cincinnati sounds like they just fell off a tobacco truck, but that is only 30% of the people :-)
 
Old 10-20-2015, 11:42 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,844,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The dialect of Western NY has some similiarities to western New England but they don't sound that similar IMO. The Western NY dialect was a very obvious vowel pattern reflecting the northern cities shift. Western New England speakers might have a weak version of one vowel shifting, but it's much less noticeable; more of a "neutral accent". Cleveland, Buffalo, Rochester and parts of Michigan share the same Great Lakes accent, nowhere in New England does.
Yeah, it's not as strong. But the stereotypical home of "neutral accents" is the Midland region, of which most of the Midwest outside of the Great Lakes is a part of, but also the Mid-Atlantic region.
 
Old 10-20-2015, 11:54 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,844,575 times
Reputation: 2585
Yous is used in Chicago even by non-Italians. Mexicans of Chicago say it and they say it with the long U sound instead of "yiz/yas". My theory on this is that Spanish and Italian, being so grammatically similar, produce the same type of poor English carryover.

There is no coincidence that NOLA, a very Italian city (for the South) produced a Northern sounding accent in its population. Where similar immigrant groups live, dialects are the same. Across the North you have much of the same immigrant groups as in New Orleans, which is why their accent sounds more Northern.

As far as Baltimore goes, is "yas" used amongst Italians? I have no idea. Haven't heard it. Then again the Italian population of Baltimore is different than that of even Philly. They have their own quirks and don't necessarily fit in to common Italian-American stereotypes. They're still proud Italians, but a different breed than the "tough guy from the Bronx" types. Maybe they say "yas", I don't know. I know for a fact that you'd be hard pressed to find anyone that uses that phrase in Baltimore much.

"Yous" is a very Northern phrase, though. It's used even in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan amongst the population. It definitely exists in Northern cities, too. It's just broken English spoken by people from non-Anglophone countries. Baltimore did have a lot of those at some point. So am I surprised if I hear it? No. Still haven't heard it. And contrary to some ignorant beliefs, yes even Whites in Baltimore can say "y'all".
 
Old 10-20-2015, 11:59 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Yeah, it's not as strong. But the stereotypical home of "neutral accents" is the Midland region, of which most of the Midwest outside of the Great Lakes is a part of, but also the Mid-Atlantic region.
I guess, I don't hear much similarities. I'd probably find the Midland region less neutral than say, western Connecticut or Massachusetts. [I'm not from Massachusetts originally, but from downstate NY]
 
Old 10-20-2015, 12:06 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 833,415 times
Reputation: 1220
If you're in a city and there is a Mountain and the Coast, you don't live in the Northeast. Pittsburgh is a great city, not Northeast just cause its in PA.
 
Old 10-20-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,226,512 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I am firmly in the 'Ohio is 100% Midwest' camp.

However, Eddie's comments on Cincinnati's accent being Midland and very similar to Philly is spot on. People here sound very similar to SE Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey even.

Most people think everyone in Cincinnati sounds like they just fell off a tobacco truck, but that is only 30% of the people :-)
Philly and south Jersey don't have neutral accents, I'm sorry. It may be close to neutral but Philly and Baltimore have unique quirks to the way they talk that Cincinnati doesn't. People from Baltimore and Philly don't have General American accents like Cincy does. It may be neutral in younger generations, but older generations sound anything but neutral.
 
Old 10-20-2015, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,385,743 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Philly and south Jersey don't have neutral accents, I'm sorry. It may be close to neutral but Philly and Baltimore have unique quirks to the way they talk that Cincinnati doesn't. People from Baltimore and Philly don't have General American accents like Cincy does. It may be neutral in younger generations, but older generations sound anything but neutral.

Yeah, I have a really hard time believing anyone in Ohio sounds like this:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEj22O1tMRU

"Take me Haaoooome" "let me da **** in da cahr den"

Last edited by 2e1m5a; 10-20-2015 at 02:44 PM..
 
Old 10-20-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,734,481 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
If you're in a city and there is a Mountain and the Coast, you don't live in the Northeast. Pittsburgh is a great city, not Northeast just cause its in PA.
Flawed logic.
 
Old 10-20-2015, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Yous is used in Chicago even by non-Italians. Mexicans of Chicago say it and they say it with the long U sound instead of "yiz/yas". My theory on this is that Spanish and Italian, being so grammatically similar, produce the same type of poor English carryover.
Then you would think it would be prevalent in a place like Los Angeles which is about 40% Hispanic at the metro level.

I think it's mostly an Italian thing. And since Italians are the largest White ethnic group in the NYC region, and are probably depicted in media more than any other group (Sopranos, Goodfellas, etc.), people tend to think it's an everybody thing. I don't find many non-Italians using "youse" though I'm sure a YouTube video can be found where a Filipino is using it or something.
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