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Old 10-30-2015, 06:47 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
I don't know why that's surprising. I think most people would be more surprised to see how much New York state is farmed-moreso than nearly any other NE state.

Also, New Jersey moreso than MA, CT, NH, ME.
I was expecting New York State to be more farmed than 25% higher than New England is rather obvious. Thought Pennsylvania would still be higher than New York; thought of it as a more of a farm state. But much of the middle of the state is forested, the most farmed areas I think are in the east of the state.

I was surprised Vermont managed to be that high, and yes New Jersey.

 
Old 10-30-2015, 06:51 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aggie75 View Post
Not here at C-D! No way, I have been on this site for about 5 or 6 years and all I have seen for years is "Outside of NYC NYS is ALL farmland" or at the very least "50 percent". I think this is great actually Just proves the know it alls on this site do speak out of their a$$es a lot
New York State is 63% forested, I've never heard anyone describe it as all farmland even on CD; it's obviously looks mostly non-farmed.

Forests - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation

Wiki numbers are lower, but they're going by timberland. I'll add from Rochester westward, New York is flat and mostly farmed — landscape looks similar to northeast Ohio.
 
Old 10-30-2015, 06:59 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,913,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Mostly because, as you know, most of the northeast is too hilly/mountainous to farm. Then there's Rhode Island and Connecticut which are urbanized heavily.

Though I am surprised that PA is slightly more farmed than NY.
Good point. I was thinking about that also. Still, even with the hills and mountains of the Northeast states, Ohio is slightly closer to Pennsylvania and New York with farmland percentage then she is with North Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Kansas. And if you took away the mountains of PA and NY, I think they would similar to Ohio.

93% Nebraska
90% South Dakota
90% Kansas
89% North Dakota
89% Iowa

56% Ohio

27% - Pennsylvania
25% - New York
 
Old 10-30-2015, 07:15 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I was expecting New York State to be more farmed than 25% higher than New England is rather obvious. Thought Pennsylvania would still be higher than New York; thought of it as a more of a farm state. But much of the middle of the state is forested, the most farmed areas I think are in the east of the state.

I was surprised Vermont managed to be that high, and yes New Jersey.
Yeah, it is especially noticeable the difference between Vermont and New Hampshire. I am not sure why.

New Jersey manages to fit quite a bit of farmland for the state with the densest population in the nation. And not to mention a fair part of New Jersey is not suitable for agriculture, like the Pine Barrens. If New Jersey was not between Philadelphia and New York City, the farmland would probably more similar to Delaware.

Farmland percentage Northeast states.

42% - Delaware
33% - Maryland
27% - Pennsylvania
25% - New York
21% - Vermont
17% - New Jersey
12% - Connecticut
10% - Massachusetts
9% - Rhode Island
8% - New Hampshire
7% - Maine
 
Old 10-30-2015, 07:24 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Yeah, it is especially noticeable the difference between Vermont and New Hampshire. I am not sure why.
Vermont has more flat-ish farming areas I think, or the soil is better. New Hampshire feels much less farmed than Vermont; feels a bit monotonous.
 
Old 10-30-2015, 07:24 AM
 
215 posts, read 303,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
New York State is 63% forested, I've never heard anyone describe it as all farmland even on CD; it's obviously looks mostly non-farmed.

Forests - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation

Wiki numbers are lower, but they're going by timberland. I'll add from Rochester westward, New York is flat and mostly farmed landscape looks similar to northeast Ohio.
Are you saying the Buffalo area is farmland? I have lived here all 39 years of my life and have yet to notice. The only farm-ish areas I see are when I am heading to Darien Lake(which is between Buff and Roch). South of Buffalo, heading toward Ralph Wilson stadium and into Allegany is ski country and extremely hilly. I am just confused. As for people commenting that NYS is mostly farmland here at C-D, yes, I have seen it time and time again, along with NYS being a barren wasteland outside NYC, despite there being numerous metros over the million population mark. I realize NYC is a BEAST, but I have seen a lot of misinformation about the Empire State time and time again here.
 
Old 10-30-2015, 07:49 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,913,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aggie75 View Post
Are you saying the Buffalo area is farmland? I have lived here all 39 years of my life and have yet to notice. The only farm-ish areas I see are when I am heading to Darien Lake(which is between Buff and Roch). South of Buffalo, heading toward Ralph Wilson stadium and into Allegany is ski country and extremely hilly. I am just confused. As for people commenting that NYS is mostly farmland here at C-D, yes, I have seen it time and time again, along with NYS being a barren wasteland outside NYC, despite there being numerous metros over the million population mark. I realize NYC is a BEAST, but I have seen a lot of misinformation about the Empire State time and time again here.
I am not sure what threads on this topic you saw. But personally, I have been here on the general forums since 2008 and I think far more the problem is some people think that New York State is just wall to wall buildings not rural areas.

You actually see posts on here like "I did not realize that (upstate) New York was so beautiful"! That is because of the overwhelming media perception of New York City, people think of the state as mostly urban.

And when they do talk of Upstate New York it is more often forests and mountains not farms.
 
Old 10-30-2015, 08:59 AM
 
215 posts, read 303,352 times
Reputation: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
I am not sure what threads on this topic you saw. But personally, I have been here on the general forums since 2008 and I think far more the problem is some people think that New York State is just wall to wall buildings not rural areas.

You actually see posts on here like "I did not realize that (upstate) New York was so beautiful"! That is because of the overwhelming media perception of New York City, people think of the state as mostly urban.

And when they do talk of Upstate New York it is more often forests and mountains not farms.
That is true too! I have seen both! I have commented numerous times how odd I find the posts here about my home state. I have seen a lot of farm posts though as well.

One thing I have seen often on this site is...

"A lot of people think NYS is urban/just NYC but what they don't realize is outside of NYC it's mostly farmland". Now that is not word for word verbatim, but close!
 
Old 10-30-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,176,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Mostly because, as you know, most of the northeast is too hilly/mountainous to farm. Then there's Rhode Island and Connecticut which are urbanized heavily.

Though I am surprised that PA is slightly more farmed than NY.

The area in the SE and especially toward lancaster is heavily farmed, also most of the areas around Philly were historically filled with farms, this still remains to an extent in the outer portions of Chester, Montgomery, and Bucks counties

the central and northeastern portions of the state are very moutainous and not conducive for large farms
 
Old 10-30-2015, 04:22 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,969,169 times
Reputation: 14673
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Mostly because, as you know, most of the northeast is too hilly/mountainous to farm. Then there's Rhode Island and Connecticut which are urbanized heavily.

Though I am surprised that PA is slightly more farmed than NY.
That doesn't really surprise me. The growing season gets steadily shorter the farther north you go from the 40th parallel, which itself is about the northernmost latitude that you can rely on a full growing season. The southern half of Pennsylvania straddles the continental and subtropical climate zones, and New York is just too far north to benefit from that. It also helps that the Piedmont extends north into Pennsylvania, which has very fertile soil in the areas where it wasn't overfarmed. There's a reason why the Amish settled on the Pennsylvania Piedmont.
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