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Old 10-30-2015, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,753,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
That doesn't really surprise me. The growing season gets steadily shorter the farther north you go from the 40th parallel, which itself is about the northernmost latitude that you can rely on a full growing season. The southern half of Pennsylvania straddles the continental and subtropical climate zones, and New York is just too far north to benefit from that. It also helps that the Piedmont extends north into Pennsylvania, which has very fertile soil in the areas where it wasn't overfarmed. There's a reason why the Amish settled on the Pennsylvania Piedmont.
Interesting.

I was mostly taken off guard because of how many farms I see up here daily, whereas most of my experience in PA has been in the center or out west.

 
Old 10-31-2015, 12:38 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,998,336 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
The area in the SE and especially toward lancaster is heavily farmed, also most of the areas around Philly were historically filled with farms, this still remains to an extent in the outer portions of Chester, Montgomery, and Bucks counties

the central and northeastern portions of the state are very moutainous and not conducive for large farms
Most of central Pennsylvania is part of the Appalachian Ridge and Valley geologic province, which is north/west of Blue Mountain and south/east of the Allegheny Front. The valleys there have fertile soil while the ridges do not, so there obviously won't be any farming on the ridges, but there is actually a good amount of small-scale farming in the valleys. It's really the northern half and western third of Pennsylvania, north/west of the Allegheny Front in the Appalachian Plateau province, where there's barely any farming, not only due to poor soil quality, but also due to the utter lack of flat land. The most you'll find in the Appalachian Plateau province is a few dairy farms, or a stray hay or corn farm. That's pretty much it, though. Closer to Lake Erie, however, you'll find lots of vineyards, because the weather near Lake Erie is ideal for growing grapes.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 04:12 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,753,379 times
Reputation: 5379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Most of central Pennsylvania is part of the Appalachian Ridge and Valley geologic province, which is north/west of Blue Mountain and south/east of the Allegheny Front. The valleys there have fertile soil while the ridges do not, so there obviously won't be any farming on the ridges, but there is actually a good amount of small-scale farming in the valleys. It's really the northern half and western third of Pennsylvania, north/west of the Allegheny Front in the Appalachian Plateau province, where there's barely any farming, not only due to poor soil quality, but also due to the utter lack of flat land. The most you'll find in the Appalachian Plateau province is a few dairy farms, or a stray hay or corn farm. That's pretty much it, though. Closer to Lake Erie, however, you'll find lots of vineyards, because the weather near Lake Erie is ideal for growing grapes.
Yeah I recently learned about the vineyards there from a couple from Erie.

Again, I was pleasantly surprised.

Funny you mention dairy farms, here in the southern tier (which trends more mountainous/cliffy than further north) dairy farms become much more common than vineyards or crops. Chicken farms too. We used to have a lot of sheep farmers here but they've vanished heavy over the last decade.

I remember when I was a kid watching sheep run across hillsides like living cottonballs.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,180 posts, read 3,859,866 times
Reputation: 2482
Northeast Ohio is very similar to Western NY and Western PA. We don't have the massive corn and soybean farms you see further west. The terrain is hillier, with more forests, and horse and dairy farms. We too have a large number of vineyards near the lake. We have a large amish country here, just like Western NY and PA. NEO is part of the appalachian plateau. Rural Western PA or Western NY are virtually indistinguishable from rural NEO.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,233,040 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Northeast Ohio is very similar to Western NY and Western PA. We don't have the massive corn and soybean farms you see further west. The terrain is hillier, with more forests, and horse and dairy farms. We too have a large number of vineyards near the lake. We have a large amish country here, just like Western NY and PA. NEO is part of the appalachian plateau. Rural Western PA or Western NY are virtually indistinguishable from rural NEO.
Since you're in the minority I'm choosing to ignore this. Besides I schooled you in my poll. Go on pleading your hopeless case to the masses.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 09:45 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,864,073 times
Reputation: 2585
I'm surprised Michigan is at Northeastern levels of farmland. But then again, Michigan is an anomaly in the Midwest to begin with.

Still waiting on someone to answer the question of how western New York is similar to the Midwest. Considering settlement patterns went West instead of East I find it very hard to believe that the Midwest could influence that part of New York State.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 10:01 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,147 posts, read 9,932,098 times
Reputation: 6429
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Since you're in the minority I'm choosing to ignore this. Besides I schooled you in my poll. Go on pleading your hopeless case to the masses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Northeast Ohio is very similar to Western NY and Western PA. We don't have the massive corn and soybean farms you see further west. The terrain is hillier, with more forests, and horse and dairy farms. We too have a large number of vineyards near the lake. We have a large amish country here, just like Western NY and PA. NEO is part of the appalachian plateau. Rural Western PA or Western NY are virtually indistinguishable from rural NEO.
You can ignore him all you want but pretty much everything Cleverfield said about Northeast Ohio is true.

If you look at a satellite view of the farmlands east of the Cleveland area - they are virtually identical to the farm areas of nearby areas of Pennsylvania and New York. The area looks like farms surrounded by forests. The farm country west of Cleveland also looks similar to Pennsylvania also, with a bit less forest and bit more farmland. It is only when you keep moving further west (like south of Sandusky) that the farmland really opens up and the forest disappears except for isolated woodlots and stream valleys.

Cleverfield is also correct about NEO being part of the Appalachian Plateau aka the Allegheny Plateau. Most of eastern Ohio is part of the Plateau, including parts of the Cleveland area. So when you consider that and also Lake Erie, you can see why some people in NEO Ohio look toward Pennsylvania rather to then say Indiana.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegheny_Plateau
 
Old 10-31-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,147 posts, read 9,932,098 times
Reputation: 6429
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I'm surprised Michigan is at Northeastern levels of farmland. But then again, Michigan is an anomaly in the Midwest to begin with.

Still waiting on someone to answer the question of how western New York is similar to the Midwest. Considering settlement patterns went West instead of East I find it very hard to believe that the Midwest could influence that part of New York State.
Yeah, the relatively low level of farmland for Michigan was probably the biggest surprise of the all the Northern states. I am not sure why it is, obviously Michigan is located further north but so are the Dakotas and they are much more heavily farmed. Maybe it is the quality of the soil in some areas of Michigan?

Regarding New York, the Northeast is pretty hilly overall and New York itself is one of the hilliest states (#37 out of 50 with 50 being the hilliest). So as you travel west on I-90 and you hit the mostly flat areas between Buffalo and Rochester, with lots of farm lands (by NE standards) - people begin to think that the area looks like Indiana or Illinois.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 02:50 PM
 
539 posts, read 405,981 times
Reputation: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Not every single person, no. You can't speak for everybody.

I'm not arguing your point but come on, be realistic here.
every single person I've talked to I meant to say. Which is a lot.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 02:55 PM
 
539 posts, read 405,981 times
Reputation: 630
This is so dumb. By the logic Cleverfield is using then since Hoboken looks like NYC it must be New York right? WRONG. The Northeast is a region that is defined by borders in the census the same as any other border. Its not up for debate.
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