U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-31-2015, 03:00 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,851,909 times
Reputation: 2585

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Yeah, the relatively low level of farmland for Michigan was probably the biggest surprise of the all the Northern states. I am not sure why it is, obviously Michigan is located further north but so are the Dakotas and they are much more heavily farmed. Maybe it is the quality of the soil in some areas of Michigan?

Regarding New York, the Northeast is pretty hilly overall and New York itself is one of the hilliest states (#37 out of 50 with 50 being the hilliest). So as you travel west on I-90 and you hit the mostly flat areas between Buffalo and Rochester, with lots of farm lands (by NE standards) - people begin to think that the area looks like Indiana or Illinois.
Eh, I guess. People see flat land and assume Midwest.

These people would be very surprised going into Northern Michigan. But of course, nobody would claim it's Northeast. It certainly is very much North, however.

I think Michigan has relatively few farms compared to Ohio and Indiana because most of the flat areas are heavily urbanized. The Lower Peninsula has many urban areas, sometimes clustered near each other. From Saginaw to Detroit, the Eastern half of Michigan is very much full of cities and isn't very rural.

Western Michigan is a bit more rural. The two main city centers of Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids aren't terribly large nor very dense. However, the climate and soil there create a better environment for vineyards, so you find more of that on the left side of the Mitten. Riesling is a very popular wine that Michigan is known for.

Now North, the area becomes much less flat. So, Michigan is hardly farmed because either it is heavily urbanized, full of vineyards, or the terrain doesn't support it. But for those that say West New York is Midwest influenced had it backwards. They influenced the Great Lakes region of the Midwest. So if anything, that region is more like the Northeast than it is like the Midwest. They got it backwards. As if settlers from the Midwest decided to colonize New York or something. It even reflects in place names of Michigan towns like Utica, Watervliet, and New Buffalo.

 
Old 10-31-2015, 03:04 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,851,909 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelers1523 View Post
This is so dumb. By the logic Cleverfield is using then since Hoboken looks like NYC it must be New York right? WRONG. The Northeast is a region that is defined by borders in the census the same as any other border. Its not up for debate.
Except when it comes to anything near DC or Baltimore amirite
 
Old 10-31-2015, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,316 posts, read 1,661,198 times
Reputation: 3586
Without any argument, everyone is in full agreement that Pennsylvania and north, up to Maine is the northeast. Many other states border that region, and thus share some similar characteristics, but that region is unequivocally the northeast. Out all the regions in the U.S. why is the northeast the region that so many other states try to "prove" that they're a part of? It's an awesome region, but what is so magical about it that people from bordering states constantly want to be included? What about just having state/city pride.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,179 posts, read 3,852,623 times
Reputation: 2478
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Without any argument, everyone is in full agreement that Pennsylvania and north, up to Maine is the northeast. Many other states border that region, and thus share some similar characteristics, but that region is unequivocally the northeast. Out all the regions in the U.S. why is the northeast the region that so many other states try to "prove" that they're a part of? It's an awesome region, but what is so magical about it that people from bordering states constantly want to be included? What about just having state/city pride.
It's not about us longing to be part of the Northeast. It's about the fact that Northeast Ohio is similar to the Western parts of the Northeast in just about every way, and we're not as similar to Midwestern cities and states. The Western part of Ohio is more like the Midwest, but Northeast Ohio and Southeast Ohio are more like the Northeast and Appalachia respectively.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 04:03 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,851,909 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Without any argument, everyone is in full agreement that Pennsylvania and north, up to Maine is the northeast. Many other states border that region, and thus share some similar characteristics, but that region is unequivocally the northeast. Out all the regions in the U.S. why is the northeast the region that so many other states try to "prove" that they're a part of? It's an awesome region, but what is so magical about it that people from bordering states constantly want to be included? What about just having state/city pride.
Because New York is supposed to be this super cool, fast tawkin, fast paced, take no BS city. Boston has this association to a smaller extent. The attitude is stereotypically "aggressive" and people want to own that. Basically, it's the antithesis to backward country bumpkin of either the South or the Midwest.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,228,885 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
It's not about us longing to be part of the Northeast. It's about the fact that Northeast Ohio is similar to the Western parts of the Northeast in just about every way, and we're not as similar to Midwestern cities and states. The Western part of Ohio is more like the Midwest, but Northeast Ohio and Southeast Ohio are more like the Northeast and Appalachia respectively.
Northeast Ohio is at best a cross between the Midwest and Northeast and you know it, and by consensus is more Midwestern. you still won't give up. Pathetic. I agree Southeast Ohio is more like the South. Appalachia consists of both the Northeast and the South thus shouldn't be used as a term to define regions.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 05:40 PM
 
1,534 posts, read 1,499,540 times
Reputation: 1540
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Eh, I guess. People see flat land and assume Midwest.

These people would be very surprised going into Northern Michigan. But of course, nobody would claim it's Northeast. It certainly is very much North, however.

I think Michigan has relatively few farms compared to Ohio and Indiana because most of the flat areas are heavily urbanized. The Lower Peninsula has many urban areas, sometimes clustered near each other. From Saginaw to Detroit, the Eastern half of Michigan is very much full of cities and isn't very rural.

Western Michigan is a bit more rural. The two main city centers of Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids aren't terribly large nor very dense. However, the climate and soil there create a better environment for vineyards, so you find more of that on the left side of the Mitten. Riesling is a very popular wine that Michigan is known for.

Now North, the area becomes much less flat. So, Michigan is hardly farmed because either it is heavily urbanized, full of vineyards, or the terrain doesn't support it. But for those that say West New York is Midwest influenced had it backwards. They influenced the Great Lakes region of the Midwest. So if anything, that region is more like the Northeast than it is like the Midwest. They got it backwards. As if settlers from the Midwest decided to colonize New York or something. It even reflects in place names of Michigan towns like Utica, Watervliet, and New Buffalo.
People in Michigan do not have an identity crisis. While Michigan is kind of a region to itself, insular and surrounded by huge bodies of water, Michiganders have no issue stating that they are part of the Midwest. If anything Cleveland could be considered partially Appalachian with close proximity to Buffalo and Rochester. Oh, and Cleveland is only around 67 miles closer to Buffalo than Detroit is to Buffalo. And for that matter, Detroit is closer to Buffalo by hundreds of miles than it is to any city in the Upper Peninsula. I forgot to ask, is Akron also Northeastern too? Or are we going to get into a history lesson of who settled Cleveland as opposed to who settled Akron. By the way, look up how Lansing got its name and who settled it.
 
Old 10-31-2015, 10:10 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,851,909 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Republic of Michigan View Post
People in Michigan do not have an identity crisis. While Michigan is kind of a region to itself, insular and surrounded by huge bodies of water, Michiganders have no issue stating that they are part of the Midwest. If anything Cleveland could be considered partially Appalachian with close proximity to Buffalo and Rochester. Oh, and Cleveland is only around 67 miles closer to Buffalo than Detroit is to Buffalo. And for that matter, Detroit is closer to Buffalo by hundreds of miles than it is to any city in the Upper Peninsula. I forgot to ask, is Akron also Northeastern too? Or are we going to get into a history lesson of who settled Cleveland as opposed to who settled Akron. By the way, look up how Lansing got its name and who settled it.
Yeah, though Michiganders DO have consistency with the Great Lakes region more than Ohio does. Probably because almost every Lake touches the state.

Michiganders though seem more in a hurry (fast paced life) and have more of a "tough blue collar" attitude. It is undoubtedly Great Lakes, which in my opinion is separate culturally from the rest of the Midwest. It's its own thing. Ohio shares that only in Cleveland.
 
Old 11-01-2015, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,741,940 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelers1523 View Post
This is so dumb. By the logic Cleverfield is using then since Hoboken looks like NYC it must be New York right? WRONG. The Northeast is a region that is defined by borders in the census the same as any other border. Its not up for debate.
I get the feeling you are a very rigid, inflexible person.

Debate is the blood of discovery, mate.
 
Old 11-01-2015, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,228,885 times
Reputation: 846
Maryland and Delaware may not have all the elements of the Northeast but culturally and linguistically and politically they are part of the Northeast. Buffalo and Pittsburgh are culturally, demographically and linguistically more like Chicago and Detroit than like Boston or New York.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top