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Old 05-08-2015, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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FWIW, the Fellowship of Christian Prisoners considers Ohio a Northeastern state.


http://christianprisonerfellowship.c.../northeast.jpg

Why are there so many "______ is a Northeastern state" threads on here? Can we get some threads where people are fighting for a state to be a part of the Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Great Plains, etc?

 
Old 05-08-2015, 08:19 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post

Why are there so many "______ is a Northeastern state" threads on here? Can we get some threads where people are fighting for a state to be a part of the Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Great Plains, etc?
I don't know, but don't you make some of those threads yourself?
 
Old 05-08-2015, 10:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
I usually think of FL as a little lower than an armpit.
The Taint of America?
 
Old 05-08-2015, 01:08 PM
 
321 posts, read 360,965 times
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I think the problem with identifying Ohio is that is transitions so many regions. The Northeast, Appalachia, The South and Midwest. To me it seems to be one of the hardest states to put neatly in a category. Even the cities within Ohio are different.
 
Old 05-08-2015, 02:13 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Ohio was part of the Northwest Territory, which became the original definition of the Midwest. The expanded definition came after places along and near the Missouri River were more heavily settled. The culture, climate and geography of the expanded portion of the Midwest was substantially the same as the original portion, and the economy was similar too, with the only real difference being that most cities in the expanded portion (Kansas City being a notable exception) were smaller and somewhat less reliant upon manufacturing.
 
Old 05-08-2015, 03:16 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Ohio was part of the Northwest Territory, which became the original definition of the Midwest. The expanded definition came after places along and near the Missouri River were more heavily settled. The culture, climate and geography of the expanded portion of the Midwest was substantially the same as the original portion, and the economy was similar too, with the only real difference being that most cities in the expanded portion (Kansas City being a notable exception) were smaller and somewhat less reliant upon manufacturing.
Hold on, buddy. The primary climate of the Midwest is practically the same as the Northeast. Both are firmly within the humid continental zone, some with cool summers the further North you go. This is the same whether you're in southern Pennsylvania or Kansas. What differs is tornadic activity, and the Great Lakes region is about as tornado prone as pretty much anywhere in the Northeast. Also, like the Midwest, the southern extremities of the Northeast transitions to humid subtropical in the same vain Southern Missouri and Illinois do, as does Southern Ohio, and of course, Southern Pennsylvania and South Jersey.

The Midwest and the Northeast have the same climate. In fact, the interior Midwest and Northeast are BOTH known for brutal snow.
 
Old 05-08-2015, 03:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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There are slight differences, which get bigger as go westward, especially west of Chicago. Past that, annual range increases, sunshine increases, winters get drier. But overall, similar climate.
 
Old 05-09-2015, 07:22 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I am in SW Ohio right now, between a small city and rural country. I have lived in New York and New Mexico for twenty years a piece.

Many people say that this part of Ohio is a Southern or Appalachian transition zone, some call the whole state Northeast. In my opinion, southwestern Ohio has influences from both of those regions, but influences are just that. This is the Midwest.
 
Old 05-09-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
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the biggest problem is that people expect these geographic designations (NE/S/MW/W) to be superfluous, unchanging, homogenous, based on the 'traditional' definitions or the opinion of one city to a region (ie NYC, so if it isn't just like NYC then it isn't Northeastern; If it isn't just like Chicago it isn't Midwestern)....

First, to answer the topic question, I've never been to Ohio, but I consider it Midwestern and all the Ohioans I met in my life consider themselves Midwesterners. I'm sure it probably pulls influence from other regions--most states do, that isn't unique...

Now to address some points previously spoken upon in this thread:

Someone claimed the South is the only well-defined region, with a distinct culture; I'd argue that the South is the most hotly debated region of this country as far as its borders and what precisely defines southern culture. City-data is evidence of that. I won't delve too much into that comment as it isn't the point of this thread, only to say I disagree with the statement...

Someone continually tries to suggest Syracuse as Midwestern, or 'not' Northeastern. News flash: it isn't Midwestern! Syracuse isn't coastal, so it doesn't have the some of the same identifiers as the coastal cities we associate with "Northeast" (Boston, New York). But much of the Northeast isn't identical to NY and Boston. It's firmly Northeastern, not even a debate....the Southern Tier of NY (Elmira was mentioned earlier) has much in common with Rural America/country living regardless of region, but is very much Northeastern, not even debatable. Rochester is definitely Northeastern, it may have something in common with a few Midwestern cities, but not with the ones I've been to (Indy, KC). There is no mistaking the Northeastern aura, notwithstanding any similarities one can cherry pick to Midwestern locales....

Buffalo, admittedly, is on the fence, but Buffalo culture, in a broad generalization, is so much more similar to Rochester than any other city, so that would make it Northeastern. The big difference with Buffalo is that it has a larger Canadian influence and the traditional parallels to Pittsburgh and Cleveland (it's not unusual to run into Ohioans and Western Pennsylvanians en masse in Buffalo). Geographically, it isnt at the "Midwest" of anywhere. Culturally, I would admit Buffalo is closer to the 50/50 line than anywhere else in the NE, but would have to say it is still NE as it compares, while not wholly, majoritavely with the cities and areas of New York State---Buffalo is Northeastern...I've never been to Pittsburgh, but I'd think the same argument I made for Buff could apply. I actually wouldn't have a problem with NE Ohio/Cleveland being considered Northeastern, if the differences in landscape and culture are as dramatic as some of you have said, once you leave the NE Ohio region westward...

Lastly, someone asked about the borders of the Northeast. Like I said, it isn't out of the question to me to consider NE Ohio as the western terminus, although I can also dig if it is closer to Youngstown? The southern boundary has been hotly contested for years now. Listen, as I mentioned above, there isn't just one version of being Northeast/ern. Regardless how Northeastern "purists" disagree, many people (me included) consider the DC area as the southernmost Northeast region. The reasons are varied, but DC is Northeastern, south to Fredericksburg, VA. The southern border cuts a westward trajectory including Culpeper, VA; and then probably cuts sharply northward, as Morgantown, WV is Northeastern....

As someone mentioned earlier, regions have never been defined by invisible state lines, and never will be...
 
Old 05-09-2015, 03:20 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Yes.

I remember taking Amtrak through Ohio. The beginning resembled upstate NY a bit, though with less hills. Further west of Cleveland, it looked very different from New York State. Big farms with little forest and very flat. New York has that in some spots but not as consistently. I felt like I was in another region.
The twilight zone!

Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
First, to answer the topic question, I've never been to Ohio, but I consider it Midwestern and all the Ohioans I met in my life consider themselves Midwesterners.
I've known some Ohioans who do not consider themselves midwesterners. I grew up in SW PA about 10 miles from Ohio. We didn't consider that part of Ohio "midwestern" in the sense of "Big Ag" country.
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