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Old 05-11-2015, 01:13 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
18,659 posts, read 19,621,153 times
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OH is a Mid Eastern state. LOL

 
Old 05-11-2015, 01:51 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,169,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Talking to people would help cement the notion, as Cincy and Philly share linguistic similarities abundantly.
Philadelphia's accent shares a number of features with its neighbors along the coast including this:

Phonological history of English short A - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

had/bad don't rhyme in both the Philadelphia and New York City.
 
Old 05-11-2015, 07:12 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,877,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Philadelphia's accent shares a number of features with its neighbors along the coast including this:

Phonological history of English short A - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

had/bad don't rhyme in both the Philadelphia and New York City.
The short a split system exists in Cincy, too.
 
Old 05-11-2015, 07:16 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,877,984 times
Reputation: 2589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
Oh. Coming from the south, you could've fooled me on that one. I mean, they're similar kinda like how maybe upscale Miami is similar to upscale Houston ....

To me, Philly has a much, much jerkier way of laying out words. More related to NYC than anywhere in the Midwest. Cinn to me let their words flow into each other much more and have a more typical Midwest "O" - very distinctive.
Well, both Cincy and Philly have a short-a split system, the fronted "O", and are both in the Midland dialect region. New York is in the Northern dialect region unlike Philly. So, no, technically Philly is more related to Cincy than it is to New York. No linguist places Philly in the same region as NYC but they do place it in the greater region that does happen to include Cincinnati.
 
Old 05-11-2015, 09:15 PM
 
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Contrary to Census groupings of regions, dialects East of the Rockies don't follow an East-West continuum, but rather a North-South continuum. This means that latitude-wise accents are more likely to be similar than longitude-wise. This is why New York's accent is different from Georgia's, but is more similar to Chicago's. This is why Charleston sounds more like Mississippi than like Philadelphia, and why Philadelphia has more in common with dialects west of it than dialects far north or south of it.

Midland American English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philly and Baltimore are Midland dialects, a transition between the Northern and the Southern. If you read the section on Cincinnati, mention is made of an NYC-like short-a split system. These short-a systems aren't unique to the East Coast. Frankly, out of the East Coast, Philly and Baltimore stand alone in that they pronounce the "r" strongly. If there is a commonality in East Coast dialects, it's that ode to the British given by major centers in the North and South. The Midland didn't adopt this, showing how Philly and Baltimore's speech patterns made their way west, which is why you find similar accents in the Midwest. There is no East Coast dialect. It's either Northern (NYC, Chicago, Boston), Midland (Philly, Pittsburgh, Cincy, Indy), or Southern (Norfolk, Atlanta, Memphis, etc.). But the dialects East of the Rockies change way more than they do East-West.
 
Old 05-12-2015, 12:15 AM
 
1,246 posts, read 1,604,343 times
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^^^ Please excuse Eddieolskool. He has no idea what he is talking about and he acts like he is a linguist. The Cincinnati accent shares little to no similarities with the Philly accent and in result, they sound very different from each other. Also according to his delusional logic, the Chicago accent is closer to and has more similarities with the Northern New Jersey/NYC accent than the Philly accent is (which of course is not true).
 
Old 05-12-2015, 12:45 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,200,019 times
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Philly sounds more like something in Ohio than something on the East Coast? IDK, that's a huge stretch. I'm sorry but Cincy didn't develop in a drastically different way than anywhere else in the MW and their people still have the nasally accent of most MW'ers. The differences I've found between them and Columbus or Indianapolis weren't great. I'm sure somebody who has studied it to the point of frustration could spot the differences between CIN and CLE much easier than I could, but the differences would be like trying to find the differences between Dallas and Houston - the changes aren't going to be vast for anybody outside the people who feel a rivalry for them.

In the grand scheme of things - I think CLE has a more Canadian accent than all of its OH counterparts - I don't consider it a Canadian city - Cleveland is very much a MW city in nearly every conceivable way to me, so is CO, so is CI.

If anything I'd find CIN to be more of a gateway to the South due to its regional locale and its surrounding topology. Not that it's Southern - I knew immediately that I was out of the south when I crossed out of KY.
 
Old 05-12-2015, 05:38 AM
 
7,906 posts, read 4,917,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
Philly sounds more like something in Ohio than something on the East Coast? IDK, that's a huge stretch. I'm sorry but Cincy didn't develop in a drastically different way than anywhere else in the MW and their people still have the nasally accent of most MW'ers. The differences I've found between them and Columbus or Indianapolis weren't great. I'm sure somebody who has studied it to the point of frustration could spot the differences between CIN and CLE much easier than I could, but the differences would be like trying to find the differences between Dallas and Houston - the changes aren't going to be vast for anybody outside the people who feel a rivalry for them.

In the grand scheme of things - I think CLE has a more Canadian accent than all of its OH counterparts - I don't consider it a Canadian city - Cleveland is very much a MW city in nearly every conceivable way to me, so is CO, so is CI.

If anything I'd find CIN to be more of a gateway to the South due to its regional locale and its surrounding topology. Not that it's Southern - I knew immediately that I was out of the south when I crossed out of KY.
Cleveland was part of the Connecticut Western Reserve. The New England influence is discernible in features such as its Public Square, a common feature of older communities in northeastern Ohio.

With its emphasis on culture and public learning (Case Western, Oberlin), Cleveland very much resembles Boston, but also Chicago. Oberlin's founders actually fled Cincinnati due to the hostility in Cincinnati towards abolitionists. That political divide still somewhat remains today with southwest Ohio considered more conservative than northeast Ohio.

However, Cleveland is much more laid-back in a Midwestern way than is Boston. Clevelanders don't talk about it much, but I'm certain they would consider themselves mostly part of the Great Lakes region, then the Midwest, but certainly would acknowledge the strong New England influence.

Now that Ohio has open-carry laws in certain entertainment districts, Cleveland in some ways is evolving into a northern version of the "Big Easy." I don't say this totally from a complimentary sense, as it also reflects the decline of the region's manufacturing muscle, which once provided great vitality and purpose to everyday life.
 
Old 05-12-2015, 09:36 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,877,984 times
Reputation: 2589
Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
^^^ Please excuse Eddieolskool. He has no idea what he is talking about and he acts like he is a linguist. The Cincinnati accent shares little to no similarities with the Philly accent and in result, they sound very different from each other. Also according to his delusional logic, the Chicago accent is closer to and has more similarities with the Northern New Jersey/NYC accent than the Philly accent is (which of course is not true).
Little to no similarities, huh? Which is why it's grouped in the same Midland category Philly is? Do you ever debate with facts or just use emotion? Pathetic. Can you read the words "Atlantic Midland" in there? You have the thickest skull ever. Have you ever considered being a boxer?



Go somewhere, little child, and let adults speak.
 
Old 05-12-2015, 09:42 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,877,984 times
Reputation: 2589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
Philly sounds more like something in Ohio than something on the East Coast? IDK, that's a huge stretch. I'm sorry but Cincy didn't develop in a drastically different way than anywhere else in the MW and their people still have the nasally accent of most MW'ers. The differences I've found between them and Columbus or Indianapolis weren't great. I'm sure somebody who has studied it to the point of frustration could spot the differences between CIN and CLE much easier than I could, but the differences would be like trying to find the differences between Dallas and Houston - the changes aren't going to be vast for anybody outside the people who feel a rivalry for them.

In the grand scheme of things - I think CLE has a more Canadian accent than all of its OH counterparts - I don't consider it a Canadian city - Cleveland is very much a MW city in nearly every conceivable way to me, so is CO, so is CI.

If anything I'd find CIN to be more of a gateway to the South due to its regional locale and its surrounding topology. Not that it's Southern - I knew immediately that I was out of the south when I crossed out of KY.
Read my post in its entirety and then take a look at the linguistic map. Try not to take isolated quotes and build arguments that way, because context is important.

Cincy is just as "gateway to the South" as any border city is, whether you're on the East Coast or Midwest. I didn't realize the South doesn't exist on the Atlantic?

Also, there is no such thing as a "Midwestern" accent. Accents are Northern, Midland, or Southern east of the Rocky mountains. Chicagoans are more likely to speak like people from Buffalo than people from Sioux City, Iowa or Kansas City.
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