U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-13-2015, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
1,823 posts, read 1,495,363 times
Reputation: 1424

Advertisements

When I think of Toronto I think what comes to mind is the Toronto Blue Jays or maybe the Raptors. I use to think the Toronto Skydome was so cool back in the day. I always thought it was smaller population wise than its actually is . It seems in population size its metro is similar in size to the Detroit- Windsor metro. I always thought it was similar in size to a Cleveland or Minneapolis any other mid sized Great Lake regional metro. I remember watching one of those Police Academy movie comedies and when the credits stated it was filmed in Toronto I was shocked because I didn't think Canadian cities had that older industrial urban gritty inter city look like a Philly, Detroit or St Louis that most major cities in the Northern and Midwest United States have. I assumed Toronto be similar in appearance to what I see in the movies or TV of a Seattle or Denver for some odd reason.

Last edited by Coseau; 05-13-2015 at 08:56 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-13-2015, 08:43 PM
 
1,632 posts, read 3,596,702 times
Reputation: 867
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Toronto is about the same size as Atlanta in population
Let's compare using those handy stats from Demographia's World Urban Areas:

Toronto - 6,456,000 people in 883 sq. miles
Atlanta - 5,015,000 people in 2,645! sq. miles

By the way, Chicago comes in at 9,156,000 people in 2,647 sq. miles
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 09:04 PM
 
1,632 posts, read 3,596,702 times
Reputation: 867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coseau View Post
When I think of Toronto I think what comes to mind is the Toronto Blue Jays or maybe the Raptors. I use to think the Toronto Skydome was so cool back in the day. I always thought it was smaller population wise than its actually is . It seems in population size its metro is similar in size to the Detroit- Windsor metro. I always thought it was similar in size to a Cleveland or Minneapolis any other mid sized Great Lake regional metro. I remember watching one of those Police Academy movie comedies and when the credits stated it was filmed in Toronto I was shocked because I didn't think Canadian cities had that older industrial urban gritty inter city look like a Philly, Detroit or St Louis that most major cities in the Northern and Midwest United States have. I assumed Toronto be similar in appearance in building stock to what I see in the movies or TV of a Seattle or Denver for some odd reason.

Good post, and yep, plenty of old, urban gritty areas in Toronto, it used to be a much more industrial city decades ago than it is today. The Greater Toronto Area is actually quite a bit bigger now than Metro Detroit population wise, exceeding it by more than two million people.

The old housing stock in Toronto consists of tightly packed brick houses, many of them rows and semi-detached homes. Lots of long, urban pre-war commercial strips of storefronts cris-crossing the city, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 10:00 PM
 
775 posts, read 478,933 times
Reputation: 1136
Pros: fairly clean, walkable, transit, enough to do, lakefront, feels safe, dense...
Cons: depending where you are it can feel sterile or grungy, expensive for what you get, lots of junkies in the parks, most newer residential architecture is thoroughly uninspired, too few bars, there's got to be some good dining options but I never found them...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 10:23 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,718,331 times
Reputation: 9029
Isn't it the most international city in the world?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,296 posts, read 3,512,168 times
Reputation: 4464
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
Let's compare using those handy stats from Demographia's World Urban Areas:

Toronto - 6,456,000 people in 883 sq. miles
Atlanta - 5,015,000 people in 2,645! sq. miles

By the way, Chicago comes in at 9,156,000 people in 2,647 sq. miles
I love Toronto, and lived in Mississauga - but those are outdated stats for Atlanta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,141,644 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
i just don't get how density is how to rate any city? I mean.... Philly for example. Is north americas "row home" city with 300,000 row homes . So it has density but lacks the high-rise living of toronto, vancouver, chicago or nyc. Some say that adds vibrancy? But as a pennsylvanian. I'm not fond of row homes.

La is thought of as sprawl central? But it is a iconic american city in its own right. It still has density too. No one questions manhattan's density. But as many know... My favorite big city is chicago. It still maintained density with a full alley system throughout the city. A wider street grid then many other cities. And all neighborhoods have green space in front and tree-lined. It has its bungalow home belt too. Of single homes built between 1910 and 1940. Someone called "quasi-suburban". Because it has all with front grass lawns. Tree-lined and back yards with garages most chose to build. All power lines are through this alleyway system. So fronts need not have ugly poles. Yet it maintained density despite it.... And city lots of fairly close homes. But still some of the city has even wider gaps between homes dating to the 1800s. Then it has empty lots on its southside cleared of decay of past decades of radical strife.... Returning to prairie. But it still has density overall?. I think it has every variety of density on could want short of acres of land.

Yet people argue denity alone? Points to degree of vibrance? I disagree it is that alone to boast.

Toronto had become canada's premier city. Its nyc or london. But it has the most boasting on c-d? And need to say we arrived accept it. To have such a thread only as to argue?????
I'm not sure what you are saying here in relation to my post Steeps which is essentially that Toronto vs most American cities is more populous, generally much more dense and compact and that we don't use MSA/CSA measures. I'm not saying Toronto is the most splended, fantastic, humongous, glorious urban lump in the galaxy, world or even the continent so chill. Don't worry - I think your precious Chicago measures up very well against Toronto.. There are aspects of each I prefer over the other but I know what you want and that is some sort of admission/capitulation from me that in every way Chicago is the better city and I simply don't believe that to be the case. I'm not sure how this is boasting Toronto to be honest..

Steeps - have you honestly been to Toronto?

Last edited by fusion2; 05-13-2015 at 11:51 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,141,644 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
I love Toronto, and lived in Mississauga - but those are outdated stats for Atlanta.
The stats are recent.... The reason the population is lower than you are used to is because the population only takes into account contiguous urbanized areas... They are not using the MSA/CSA measures which you are accustomed to in the U.S - which are not contiguous urbanized areas. Mississauga largely sucks lol - downtown is a shopping mall and condo's but I did enjoy the Credit river valley when I lived there

Last edited by fusion2; 05-13-2015 at 11:53 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 11:27 PM
 
12 posts, read 7,705 times
Reputation: 25
It's a cleaner, safer, friendlier, less impoverished version of Chicago with less to do, less diversity (but still more than most cities), worse bars, less character, crappy beaches, and less options in terms of food (both ethnic and fine-dining).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
1,168 posts, read 2,535,155 times
Reputation: 1354
I don't think Toronto is really on the radar of most Americans. I think most Americans think of Toronto as being a mini-New York and I think most Americans would rather just visit New York. That's sort of how I felt about Toronto until I visited and realized it was actually a really cool city. Toronto just isn't known for much. It's not known for its natural beauty like Vancouver or its francophone culture like Montreal. Toronto seems to have done a terrible job of marketing itself to its neighbors across the border.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top