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Old 05-14-2015, 05:23 AM
 
4,881 posts, read 4,856,782 times
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This US resident loves Toronto.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,149,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
I don't think Toronto is really on the radar of most Americans. I think most Americans think of Toronto as being a mini-New York and I think most Americans would rather just visit New York. That's sort of how I felt about Toronto until I visited and realized it was actually a really cool city. Toronto just isn't known for much. It's not known for its natural beauty like Vancouver or its francophone culture like Montreal. Toronto seems to have done a terrible job of marketing itself to its neighbors across the border.
I'd encourage anyone who comes to the city just to have an open mind about it - don't come with any expectation and don't come with comparisons in mind and don't be a lazy tourist lol there isn't any mountains or french culture but there's lots to see and do in an urban sense if you explore.. The city is bigger than its DT core!

As for number of visitiors to Toronto believe it or not though and of course some of this is business too because Toronto is the largest city economy in Canada by a fairly large margin, but more Americans travel to Toronto than any other Canadian city. Part of it could be the city holds some fairly large events/festivals and is simply close but it is gaining traction as a growing urban destination. In terms of aviation, It easily has the most O/D and transit pax at its airport for U.S flights of any Canadian airport and rather unnofficial but Toronto is actually the 3rd most visited foreign city by Americans.

London holds onto its crown as most popular destination for US travellers | Daily Mail Online

Toronto is actually the most visited city in Canada period so please feel free to keep coming lol..

20 Canadian cities international travellers visit most | Canada | Travel | Toron

Last edited by fusion2; 05-14-2015 at 06:23 AM..
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,949 posts, read 27,371,773 times
Reputation: 8606
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
I don't think Toronto is really on the radar of most Americans. I think most Americans think of Toronto as being a mini-New York and I think most Americans would rather just visit New York. That's sort of how I felt about Toronto until I visited and realized it was actually a really cool city. Toronto just isn't known for much. It's not known for its natural beauty like Vancouver or its francophone culture like Montreal. Toronto seems to have done a terrible job of marketing itself to its neighbors across the border.
I dunno. Although I think there is definitely some truth to that, Toronto is well-known and well visited by millions of Americans especially from the Midwest and the Northeast (especially upstate NY and adjacent areas).

It is also popular with American sports fans as it has teams in three of the big four (and four if you count MLS) US pro sports leagues.

It's also a popular lower-cost alternative destination (to NYC) for musical theatre and other forms of entertainment.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:44 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,633,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
Metro areas usually follow county borders and include lots of rural land, and the fact that Seattle's metro has a larger area than Toronto's but with a smaller population isn't exactly a good thing for Seattle.

According to Demographia's World Urban Areas 2015 Edition, which calculates only the urbanized portion of the two metros you get this:

Toronto - 6,456,000 people in 883 sq. miles.
Seattle - 3,218,000 people in 1,010 sq. miles
INMO, packing more and more people in a small area is a bad idea.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:55 AM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,757,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
Let's compare using those handy stats from Demographia's World Urban Areas:

Toronto - 6,456,000 people in 883 sq. miles
Atlanta - 5,015,000 people in 2,645! sq. miles

By the way, Chicago comes in at 9,156,000 people in 2,647 sq. miles
And the moment you trot out those handy stats, you've kind of lost the argument. First, Atlanta's metro population was actually around 5.5 million in 2014. What's more, it kind of misses the point. By the time you speak in terms of cities that size, a million doesn't make that much of a difference.

In terms of economic influence, media influence, amenities and just about every other measuring stick you can trot out, Atlanta and Toronto are roughly equal. And I make this argument as a fan of Toronto and as someone who kind of dislikes Atlanta. Neither city comes close to comparing with Chicago, let alone New York. They are cities in a completely different category.

What's more you bandy about the land area as if it has any meaning whatsoever. Toronto is constrained on one side by Lake Ontario. This challenge drives density chiefly because roughly 50% of the area around the city center is water, which in turn forces high urban density in the remaining portion that's on land. That's necessity, not virtue. If Toronto were situated in the middle of Ontario rather than on the shore of a lake, you would see it more spread out. Atlanta has plenty of cheap, available land surrounding it, so that's where the growth goes.
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,502 posts, read 1,355,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
INMO, packing more and more people in a small area is a bad idea.
Yes, so let's just keep sprawling outwards until there is no land left for farming or nature!?!? So much better than to grow upwards and protect presious natural areas!
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:42 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,633,658 times
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Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Yes, so let's just keep sprawling outwards until there is no land left for farming or nature!?!? So much better than to grow upwards and protect presious natural areas!
Or you can keep building like there's no tomorrow and live in these..

http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slides...47680_free.jpg
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,502 posts, read 1,355,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Or you can keep building like there's no tomorrow and live in these..

http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slides...47680_free.jpg
If people are happy living in those, then who cares! Not everyone wants a big house and yard in the suburbs.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:12 PM
 
1,632 posts, read 3,598,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
And the moment you trot out those handy stats, you've kind of lost the argument. First, Atlanta's metro population was actually around 5.5 million in 2014. What's more, it kind of misses the point. By the time you speak in terms of cities that size, a million doesn't make that much of a difference.

In terms of economic influence, media influence, amenities and just about every other measuring stick you can trot out, Atlanta and Toronto are roughly equal. And I make this argument as a fan of Toronto and as someone who kind of dislikes Atlanta. Neither city comes close to comparing with Chicago, let alone New York. They are cities in a completely different category.

What's more you bandy about the land area as if it has any meaning whatsoever. Toronto is constrained on one side by Lake Ontario. This challenge drives density chiefly because roughly 50% of the area around the city center is water, which in turn forces high urban density in the remaining portion that's on land. That's necessity, not virtue. If Toronto were situated in the middle of Ontario rather than on the shore of a lake, you would see it more spread out. Atlanta has plenty of cheap, available land surrounding it, so that's where the growth goes.
As was already explained by Fusion, those stats are for urbanized area, not metro areas, and they are up to date and accurate.

Toronto is Canada's media centre and third largest media centre in Canamerica after New York and Los Angeles. Look at any list ranking the power and influence of global cities and you'll find that Toronto and Chicago are always in the same category with Atlanta a tier or two below them. What amenities does Chicago have that can't be found in Toronto?

Chicago is also constrained on one side by a lake but yet Chicagoland is far more spread out and less densely populated than the Greater Toronto-Hamilton area. Most Large Canadian cities are just denser by design than most American cities.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:32 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,757,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
As was already explained by Fusion, those stats are for urbanized area, not metro areas, and they are up to date and accurate.

Toronto is Canada's media centre and third largest media centre in Canamerica after New York and Los Angeles. Look at any list ranking the power and influence of global cities and you'll find that Toronto and Chicago are always in the same category with Atlanta a tier or two below them. What amenities does Chicago have that can't be found in Toronto?

Chicago is also constrained on one side by a lake but yet Chicagoland is far more spread out and less densely populated than the Greater Toronto-Hamilton area. Most Large Canadian cities are just denser by design than most American cities.
Again, it's a very pointless distinction you and Fusion are drawing. Atlanta, in addition to its downtown area, has any number of areas that could be considered urbanized. They just happen to be spread out with a lot of neighborhoods in between. It's weird that I'm having to defend Atlanta, because I don't like the town very much.

And, hey, I get it. You love your city. But let's take off the Chamber of Commerce hat for a few minutes. Toronto just isn't at the same level as Chicago, no way no how. I'm there, on average a couple of times a year to shoot television. Like it a lot. Good restaurants. Fun museums. But no.
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