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Old 05-10-2015, 02:43 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,862 times
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It seems to defy common sense but I can attest based on experience in certain cities. That many metro areas that are economic powerhouses have much more crime then bad economy cities.

I took a trip to Hartford, Connecticut. The metro has evidence of an extremely bad economy at every turn. The unemployment rate in the area is 6.5% and it has low job growth. Yet it seems the police departments around the area are very bored there. I looked at the crime statistics and the whole metro had a total of 35 homicides in 2013 which is 3.4 per 100,000 residents. The violent crime rate is 264 per 100,000 residents which is unusually low for a large area.

Metros such as Providence, Los Angeles and New York have far lower crime rates then one would expect for their size. But yet all three of those places have above 6 percent unemployment and have been economically depressed many years already.

Then there are metros like Oklahoma City, San Antonio and San Francisco which are economic powerhouses. With a tremendous amount of high-value commercial property within their cities. They have low unemployment rates and can afford every tool to address social issues but yet some how they can't get there high rates of shootings and robberies in balance.

Oklahoma City last year despite having the lowest unemployment rate of any metro area over 1 million people had just over 6,600 violent crimes for 1,300,000 people. San Antonio also had a very rough year comperative to it's population. However, San Antonio on a per-capita basis has an extremely high amount of corperate wealth and a good sales tax and property tax base to draw from.

Even the Houston metro area has far more wealth on a per-capita basis then many metros. But yet it's city is one of the most violent. Houston has a much lower unemployment rate then Las Vegas, Nevada and lower then Providence. But the Houston area has 559 violent crimes per 100,000 residents, compared to 338 per 100,000 in Providence, RI.
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:47 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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If you take into account murders only, none of the cities with great economies are in the top 10. Of the top 100 most dangerous cities, Hartford is #45, Oklahoma city is #66, ad Houston is #68, not one of the most violent. Neither San Francisco nor San Antonio even made the list. If you consider property crime, one would expect more in areas with a great economy, as those without are more likely to take from those that have. In some of the cities with good economies there is still deep rooted gang activity and the rival gangs have a habit of shooting at each other, regardless of the state of the economy.

Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not ok


These Are The Major U.S. Cities With The Highest Murder Rates, According To The FBI

Last edited by Yac; 05-13-2015 at 06:30 AM..
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Old 05-10-2015, 04:04 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
If you take into account murders only, none of the cities with great economies are in the top 10. Of the top 100 most dangerous cities, Hartford is #45, Oklahoma city is #66, ad Houston is #68, not one of the most violent. Neither San Francisco nor San Antonio even made the list. If you consider property crime, one would expect more in areas with a great economy, as those without are more likely to take from those that have. In some of the cities with good economies there is still deep rooted gang activity and the rival gangs have a habit of shooting at each other, regardless of the state of the economy.
I was talking more of the metro area.

[URL="http://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laulrgma.htm"]Unemployment Rates for Large Metropolitan Areas[/URL]

[URL="http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2013/crime-in-the-u.s.-2013/tables/6tabledatadecpdf/table-6"]FBI — Table 6[/URL]
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,537 posts, read 708,496 times
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I definitely wouldn't say that high crime naturally accompanies a booming economy (and there are multiple ways of defining that) - but yes, I think your impression is correct that economic performance and crime don't correlate as strongly as one would think, maybe not at all.

For some cities, segregation may be a factor. Having clearly delineated "safe" white neighborhoods can attract high-paying white-collar jobs and workers to fill them, while neighborhoods with large black or Latino majorities tend to be isolated from those economic benefits, policing, tourism, and even blue-collar job opportunities - hence, higher crime. This would apply to Chicago, Washington DC, Detroit, Philadelphia, and a number of other "older" cities.
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Old 01-09-2019, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Because crime is a moral not an economic issue.
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Old 01-10-2019, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
562 posts, read 539,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
I definitely wouldn't say that high crime naturally accompanies a booming economy (and there are multiple ways of defining that) - but yes, I think your impression is correct that economic performance and crime don't correlate as strongly as one would think, maybe not at all.

For some cities, segregation may be a factor. Having clearly delineated "safe" white neighborhoods can attract high-paying white-collar jobs and workers to fill them, while neighborhoods with large black or Latino majorities tend to be isolated from those economic benefits, policing, tourism, and even blue-collar job opportunities - hence, higher crime. This would apply to Chicago, Washington DC, Detroit, Philadelphia, and a number of other "older" cities.
The benefits of economic growth in these cities tend to be concentrated at the top and among specific creative and service segments of the economy. This re-enforces inequality. Research bears out that it is this increasing inequality that has a relationship with crime. You see this nationally and in cities where there is a high level of inequality. Segregation is a result of history that is compounded by the inequality.

Economist: The stark relationship between income inequality and crime
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,506 posts, read 2,170,560 times
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The South has always had much higher violent crime rates than the North.
https://www.nytimes.com/1998/07/26/w...s-so-high.html
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