U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-10-2015, 03:18 PM
 
23 posts, read 26,603 times
Reputation: 19

Advertisements

In most arizona cities, the high temperatures vary by 30 to 40 degrees fahrenheit between the coldest time and warmest time of the year. But in cities like Boston, Chicago, New York, it varies by more like 50F. Why so?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-10-2015, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,872,221 times
Reputation: 33476
thermometers are significantly shorter in length in Arizona
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,510,289 times
Reputation: 2935
Quote:
Originally Posted by shrek2001 View Post
In most arizona cities, the high temperatures vary by 30 to 40 degrees fahrenheit between the coldest time and warmest time of the year. But in cities like Boston, Chicago, New York, it varies by more like 50F. Why so?
And in San Diego there's a 11-degree difference between daytimes highs winter and summer.
In Minneapolis it's a 60-degree difference between winter and summer.
In Winnipeg it's nearly a 70-degree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2015, 10:56 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,833 times
Reputation: 2543
I never found winters in Arizona to nearly as warm as they're purported to be. Mild, for summer, but definitely not "warm" in the same regard as winters in Florida.

When I lived in Scottsdale, I consistently wore a beanie and gloves on my 5:00am runs from December 1 - March 1. I even had to de-ice my car windows on some mornings.

I don't know about you, but I don't think that's much compensation for the hellishly hot summers, where high temps over 100 degrees are daily occurrences from May to September.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2015, 12:03 PM
 
1,583 posts, read 2,014,197 times
Reputation: 3332
Arizona's weather statewide is moderated by its southerly location, regional topography, and location between the Pacific and Gulf of California. Generally, the farther south and closer to the coast you get, the less the temperature varies from winter to summer. If you look at other inland cities that are on the same latitude as major Arizona cities, you'll find similar temperature variations. Dallas comes to mind. Average high in the winter is in the 50s and the average high in the summer is in the 90s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 01:47 PM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,461,251 times
Reputation: 2855
The short answer is "climate" but the longer answer is complex. One big factor is that closer to the equator ("south" in the U.S.) there's less impact from planetary tilt.

As you go away from the equator there's a much greater shift in length and angle of sunlight between winter and summer. In Tucson you get 14 hours of sunlight in summer and 11 in winter; in Anchorage it's more like 19 in summer and 5.5 in winter. Considering the sun's role in warming, that alone would account for quite a bit of why one changes a lot and one much less so.

There's more to it, and indeed more than I understand, but within the U.S. the Jet stream is a factor. The Jet stream tends to shift southward during the winter, and for states sitting north of it the bulk of their weather comes down from even farther north. So part of the reason its cold in Minneapolis is that on an average day they're getting second-hand weather passed down from Canada where it's even darker and colder still. South of the jet stream the weather will generally be either from the west off the pacific (temperate) or coming up from the south (warmer).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 01:52 PM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,510,871 times
Reputation: 6606
This is like asking why Florida's climate doesn't change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top