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Old 05-12-2015, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
3,114 posts, read 2,525,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'm not even sure what this comment means. Particularly because Pittsburgh has a shrinking metro population, but is clearly gentrifying.
I'm sorry, I thought that the OP included the suburbs and was talking about Utica-Rome, which has a metro of roughly 305,000.

I don't think of Pittsburgh as a small city.
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,269,803 times
Reputation: 36087
Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
Huntsville is a suburb of where exactly? The nearest larger cities are Birmingham and Nashville which are both two hours away.
Wht he's saying is that Huntsville's population is sprawled out so loosely, that nearly all of the metro feels like a suburb. It feels like a displaced suburb that has been removed from its core city.
(I'm not vouching for that observation, just interpreting what I think the poster is trying to say.)
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Old 05-13-2015, 09:12 AM
 
72 posts, read 118,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I've lived happily in Pittsburgh for ten years now, a city which lost over half its population since 1950. That said, it's estimated the city actually bottomed out around 2007, and has been growing slowly since. We'll see when the 2010 census comes out.

Pittsburgh shrunk for fairly idiosyncratic reasons however. Compared to other rust-belt cities it had a much higher drop in average household size. As a result, despite the city losing 370,000 people from its peak, if it gained another 110,000 people, the number of households in the city would be equal to 1950 - meaning in a certain sense the city would be "full" again. In addition, in more recent decades the drop in metro population has mostly been due to negative population growth. The older than average population has meant births outweigh deaths here, which canceled out the positive net migration the region as a whole now has.
This is a good point. I see you say it's slowly growing but statistics here on Sperling's show it's declining. I'm trying to understand that. Housing is affordable but taxes are quite expensive. Does this population consist of mostly individuals who've resided there for their entire lives or transplants? I'm curious as to how long it may take to bounce back or if it will. Would this be a good place to invest in real estate? (short term/long term) Or, will it stay flat for a while? Once again, this is a great example.
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Old 05-13-2015, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,427 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by movingacrosstown View Post
This is a good point. I see you say it's slowly growing but statistics here on Sperling's show it's declining. I'm trying to understand that. Housing is affordable but taxes are quite expensive. Does this population consist of mostly individuals who've resided there for their entire lives or transplants? I'm curious as to how long it may take to bounce back or if it will. Would this be a good place to invest in real estate? (short term/long term) Or, will it stay flat for a while? Once again, this is a great example.
As I said, estimates I've seen of Pittsburgh's population suggest it bottomed out around 2007, and started growing slowly after that. The census officially estimates the 2013 population was 305,841, which is 139 people higher than in 2010. That isn't much growth, but it's something. It's highly unlikely that Pittsburgh will shrink in population for the 2010s.

Here's a link to an article showing that Pittsburgh's MSA as a whole had positive net population growth (more people migrating in then leaving) every year since 2008. It slowed down more recently, which is because the differential between Pittsburgh's economy and the rest of the country has closed. We didn't have a bad economy locally during the recession and the early part of the "recovery" There was also no local housing market crash at all. Thus we looked comparably better back in 2011 or so. Now the gap has closed significantly, since the rest of the country is doing better. Pittsburgh has still had 100 straight months of unemployment below the U.S. average though.



Pittsburgh is known for being a strong real estate market, although it has again been weakening a bit as other areas recover. Over the last year, it was only the 12th strongest market in the country, but over the last ten years, it was the second strongest. Again, this is because there was no crash of the housing bubble here. It just kept chugging along.

Pittsburgh was recently rated the number two city to flip a home, with an 89% return on investment. The market in Pittsburgh is especially strong for rentals - we don't have a large apartment stock due to the nature of our city, so while house prices remain below national averages, apartments are getting very expensive with the influx of young transplants into the city. I know people who have bought houses, fixed them up, and essentially paid off the mortgage in only five years.
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Old 05-13-2015, 02:25 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,049,650 times
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If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you jump, too?

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Old 05-13-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449
Been there, done that. Last year I moved from Portland, OR to Cleveland, OH. I have been told that the inner ring suburb of Cleveland Heights where I landed and Cleveland in general has lost population while Portland's population has been growing by leaps and bounds.

Do I care? No. I decided to make the move because Cleveland suited all my needs and Portland no longer did. It's as simple as that.

One city's exodus is another's welcome home.
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