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View Poll Results: Does the Bay Area have a sense of identity and place that exceeds all other metro areas?
yes 5 11.63%
no (can you name area that equals or exceeds it) 38 88.37%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-14-2015, 12:11 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,460 posts, read 25,405,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Yeah. I don't think it's obnoxious or presumptuous. There was a fairly popular song called "From L.A. to Da Bay." I don't see it as being any more presumptuous than someone telling me they are from the CHI or the "D" (That's Detroit, not Denver).

Even 2,500 miles away, I think most people have different mental images of San Francisco and Oakland. I think of San Francisco as being yuppie and white collar and Oakland as being more working-class and diverse. When I hear "Oakland," I think of hyphy, Oakland As fitted caps, diehard Raiders fans and trees for some reason. This is totally different from Dallas-Ft. Worth where the former completely dominates the public's perception of the region as a whole. I can't tell you much about FW beyond saying it's close to Dallas.

Even though San Francisco is the Alpha in the Bay Area, my mind doesn't automatically default to images of cable cars and the Golden Gate Bridge when someone says "Da Bay." It seems that Oakland has more cultural weight in its respective region than, say, Newark or St. Pete in the Tampa metro area.
So basically people who listen to hip hop would know "Da Bay"? I guess I was more curious about the general population as opposed to a somewhat specific demographic you seem to be referencing. So if for example, some WASPy UES Manhattanite asked me where I was from and I responded with "The Bay" you think they would know what I'm referring to?
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11711
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
So basically people who listen to hip hop would know "Da Bay"? I guess I was more curious about the general population as opposed to a somewhat specific demographic you seem to be referencing. So if for example, some WASPy UES Manhattanite asked me where I was from and I responded with "The Bay" you think they would know what I'm referring to?
Well, the most recent example I can think of was a white girl in Manhattan who is a transactional lawyer. I'm not sure if she's a hip hop head or not. Her exact response to my question was "the Bay Area" and it was clear to everyone in the group what she meant.

The other metro that's a bit similar in this regard is the Twin Cities. I think most people would interpret that more generally as the Minneapolis metropolitan area.
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,426 posts, read 1,882,039 times
Reputation: 1493
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Yeah. I don't think it's obnoxious or presumptuous. There was a fairly popular song called "From L.A. to Da Bay." I don't see it as being any more presumptuous than someone telling me they are from the CHI or the "D" (That's Detroit, not Denver).

Even 2,500 miles away, I think most people have different mental images of San Francisco and Oakland. I think of San Francisco as being yuppie and white collar and Oakland as being more working-class and diverse. When I hear "Oakland," I think of hyphy, Oakland As fitted caps, diehard Raiders fans and trees for some reason. This is totally different from Dallas-Ft. Worth where the former completely dominates the public's perception of the region as a whole. I can't tell you much about FW beyond saying it's close to Dallas.

Even though San Francisco is the Alpha in the Bay Area, my mind doesn't automatically default to images of cable cars and the Golden Gate Bridge when someone says "Da Bay." It seems that Oakland has more cultural weight in its respective region than, say, Newark or St. Pete in the Tampa metro area.
Yeah, PLUS Oakland is cool right now. Not in the overplayed sense that Hipsters are taking over, but in the sense that it is still a place where a diverse set of people, no matter their class ($$$), race, sexuality, ethnicity or religion can still have a stake in the place. Not to mention the food scene, and the music culture. Oakland is ALIVE, while San Francisco has become the museum where you take your momma out to brunch. When I first started visiting the Bay Area, it was always centered around San Francisco...as the years have passed, the gravitational pull towards Oakland has increased. I still have a soft place in my heart for the Mission though...mostly it's in my stomach for the burritos. LOL.

I don't expect this to last too long (San Francisco rent prices are already hitting the nicer parts of Oakland), but it is what it is.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:08 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,226 posts, read 19,531,226 times
Reputation: 12969
Okay folks, it's quiz time. Type in all of these into google and see what you get:

tri-state area

dmv area

hampton roads

golden horseshoe

twin cities

research triangle
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11711
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Okay folks, it's quiz time. Type in all of these into google and see what you get:

tri-state area

dmv area

hampton roads

golden horseshoe

twin cities
I had already Googled "Tri-State" and got back a number of different results. But "Tri-State area" is not a real identity here. That's not a term that you hear beyond commericals for your local "Tri-State Toyota dealership" or something. It's used to describe the NYC metro area but nobody really asserts that as an identity.

Hampton Roads probably best approximates the relationship among the three (or four) large Bay Area cities. I know people who will say they are from Seven Cities (moreso than saying Hampton Roads). DMV seems to be a more recent thing that WKYS/WPGC spawned in the late 2000s. A lot of people in the area wouldn't even know what it meant.

When I travel to the SF metro area, I will usually say I'm headed to the Bay Area no matter what part of the region I'm traveling to. For me, "Bay Area" can mean Stanford/Palo Alto, Oakland, Berkeley, San Francisco or Napa. My conception of the Bay Area doesn't center as much around San Francisco as my conception of "DMV" centers around the District of Columbia.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11711
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
DMV seems to be a more recent thing that WKYS/WPGC spawned in the late 2000s. A lot of people in the area wouldn't even know what it meant.
Quote:
Sleek, succinct and inclusive, the name has been in common use for several years among the area's -- ahem, the DMV's -- hip-hop and go-go music crowd. It's familiar to listeners of black-oriented radio stations such as WKYS-FM and WPGC-FM, whose DJs decorate their patter with mentions of it. It also pops up as geographical shorthand ("DMV man seeks woman") on Craigslist, the classified-ad Web site.

It's safe to say, however, that most of the rest of the DMV's populace is unaware that the DMV refers to anything other than a certain sluggish city bureaucracy. Although the phrase has appeared irregularly in The Washington Post, most mainstream news sources haven't picked up on it.
After initial obscurity, 'The DMV' nickname for Washington area picks up speed
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:42 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,226 posts, read 19,531,226 times
Reputation: 12969
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
For me, "Bay Area" can mean Stanford/Palo Alto, Oakland, Berkeley, San Francisco or Napa.
I have been to all of those places many times myself. The one image that towers and defines above all else is San Francisco.

The great majority of people in America or the world have practically no conception of what the bay area is like other than their image of San Francisco. But I'm afraid I'm repeating myself here. LOL.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,460 posts, read 25,405,649 times
Reputation: 8936
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I have been to all of those places many times myself. The one image that towers and defines above all else is San Francisco.

The great majority of people in America or the world have practically no conception of what the bay area is like other than their image of San Francisco. But I'm afraid I'm repeating myself here. LOL.
When you meet people from the SF Bay Area, do they usually say they're from the "Bay Area" or something else like "San Francisco Bay Area"? Assuming you even come across that many people from here of course.

I always say "San Francisco Bay Area" when outside of CA/West Coast, just wondering what other's say usually.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,426 posts, read 1,882,039 times
Reputation: 1493
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
When you meet people from the SF Bay Area, do they usually say they're from the "Bay Area" or something else like "San Francisco Bay Area"? Assuming you even come across that many people from here of course.

I always say "San Francisco Bay Area" when outside of CA/West Coast, just wondering what other's say usually.
While I was at Cal State Long Beach, all my friends from the Bay Area usually told me they were from "the Bay Area" or even just NorCal. If I cared to know more, I would have to ask "Where exactly in the Bay Area?". Very few were actually from SF...but I know a lot from San Jose, Fremont, Oakland.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:23 PM
 
Location: LoS ScAnDaLoUs KiLLa CaLI
1,227 posts, read 1,195,352 times
Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
Yeah, PLUS Oakland is cool right now. Not in the overplayed sense that Hipsters are taking over, but in the sense that it is still a place where a diverse set of people, no matter their class ($$$), race, sexuality, ethnicity or religion can still have a stake in the place. Not to mention the food scene, and the music culture. Oakland is ALIVE, while San Francisco has become the museum where you take your momma out to brunch. When I first started visiting the Bay Area, it was always centered around San Francisco...as the years have passed, the gravitational pull towards Oakland has increased. I still have a soft place in my heart for the Mission though...mostly it's in my stomach for the burritos. LOL.

I don't expect this to last too long (San Francisco rent prices are already hitting the nicer parts of Oakland), but it is what it is.
I think for those who really like LA (and I assume you do), Oakland seems like a much more palatable place than San Francisco does. I love the East Bay myself, though I feel like nowadays, it's becoming an extension of SF itself. It's actually going to be sad seeing the Warriors move from Oakland to SF, since basketball is MUCH more rooted in Oakland than it is in SF.

I can agree with the fact that a lot of people know the huge difference between Oakland and SF. However, I would say the differences between LA and OC are pretty well known as well. It shocks a lot of people to know that the demographics of OC and LA (racially anyways) are nearly alike nowadays, except for the fact that OC has way less Black people.

PS: Santa Ana isn't the hood. I don't think you think that, but by OC standards, it's supposed to be worse than Compton. What a joke.
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