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View Poll Results: Does the Bay Area have a sense of identity and place that exceeds all other metro areas?
yes 5 11.63%
no (can you name area that equals or exceeds it) 38 88.37%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-14-2015, 02:30 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,453,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
While I was at Cal State Long Beach, all my friends from the Bay Area usually told me they were from "the Bay Area" or even just NorCal. If I cared to know more, I would have to ask "Where exactly in the Bay Area?". Very few were actually from SF...but I know a lot from San Jose, Fremont, Oakland.
Yeah I did the same when I moved to San Diego as did everyone else I knew from the area. It's all California and we know much more about other parts of the state than people in other parts of the US. I just didn't think the majority of people say "Bay Area" when they're in the Midwest and East Coast, but maybe they do and I'm the oddball lol.

Usually people actually from the city of SF will say San Francisco from my experience, they tend to take a little extra pride in that.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Newark, CA
2,168 posts, read 4,750,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
While I was at Cal State Long Beach, all my friends from the Bay Area usually told me they were from "the Bay Area" or even just NorCal. If I cared to know more, I would have to ask "Where exactly in the Bay Area?". Very few were actually from SF...but I know a lot from San Jose, Fremont, Oakland.
This^

I live in Newark. I'd never say I'm from San Francisco. SF and Newark are not even remotely similar on any level, plus I live closer to San Jose than I do to SF. I always just say I'm from the Bay Area or SF Bay Area depending on how familiar somebody is with CA. The city of SF itself only represents a very small population of Bay Area residents and it's not even the most populated city in the region. Even cities like Oakland and Fremont cover more land area than SF does.

Of course most people from outside the region recognize SF as the focal point of the region, but in reality many of us who live in the Bay Area don't have much association with it. I know plenty of people who only go to The City once or twice a year, myself included. I actually haven't been there for over a year. I've been to San Jose many times over the last year though and Oakland a few times too.

The Bay Area is anchored by three major cities- San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland. The only time I could see somebody not saying they're from the Bay Area and using their specific city name is if they actually lived in one of these three cities. These cities all have a big enough identity and sphere of influence within the region. That's just my opinion.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,284 posts, read 26,292,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The great majority of people in America or the world have practically no conception of what the bay area is like other than their image of San Francisco. But I'm afraid I'm repeating myself here. LOL.
I don't agree with that. There's a definitely a certain perception of Napa in the public consciousness. That's why you can buy Napa vacation packages on Orbitz while you can't do the same for Northern Virginia or Montgomery County.

San Francisco is definitely much more recognized than Oakland, but it's not like Oakland's stature is comparable to Alexandria, VA, Fort Worth, TX or St. Petersburg, FL. DC is really the only thing Americans know about when it comes to the DC area whereas the Bay Area has a few locations that (Oakland, Napa) that register higher on people's radar.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,426 posts, read 1,887,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lets Eat Candy View Post
I think for those who really like LA (and I assume you do), Oakland seems like a much more palatable place than San Francisco does. I love the East Bay myself, though I feel like nowadays, it's becoming an extension of SF itself. It's actually going to be sad seeing the Warriors move from Oakland to SF, since basketball is MUCH more rooted in Oakland than it is in SF.

I can agree with the fact that a lot of people know the huge difference between Oakland and SF. However, I would say the differences between LA and OC are pretty well known as well. It shocks a lot of people to know that the demographics of OC and LA (racially anyways) are nearly alike nowadays, except for the fact that OC has way less Black people.

PS: Santa Ana isn't the hood. I don't think you think that, but by OC standards, it's supposed to be worse than Compton. What a joke.
Probably pretty true, aha. Also Oakland reminds me of a more urbanized Long Beach, I am quite fond of Long Beach. So there is that.

Yeah, Santa Ana is like a black hole in the OC forum threads LOL. People down here act like they think they know what hood is.

Also spot on the demographics. I've actually been noticing more black folks moving into Buena Park (where I call home) over the last couple years...and they now make up 3.82% of the population. Nothing by LA standards sure enough, but probably the highest percentage wise in all of OC. Still a mystery (okay, maybe not that big of a mystery) to me why a county line has such a high impact on where a certain group chooses to locate, when it hasn't stop all other groups.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:04 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,538,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't agree with that. There's a definitely a certain perception of Napa in the public consciousness. That's why you can buy Napa vacation packages on Orbitz while you can't do the same for Northern Virginia or Montgomery County.

San Francisco is definitely much more recognized than Oakland, but it's not like Oakland's stature is comparable to Alexandria, VA, Fort Worth, TX or St. Petersburg, FL. DC is really the only thing Americans know about when it comes to the DC area whereas the Bay Area has a few locations that (Oakland, Napa) that register higher on people's radar.
I'm with BigCityDreamer - I didn't even know Napa was in the Bay Area. I think of SF, Oakland, and maybe San Jose when I hear Bay Area. Outside of these, I know nothing else. I just googled the Bay Area - didn't know it was so large.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,284 posts, read 26,292,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
While I was at Cal State Long Beach, all my friends from the Bay Area usually told me they were from "the Bay Area" or even just NorCal. If I cared to know more, I would have to ask "Where exactly in the Bay Area?". Very few were actually from SF...but I know a lot from San Jose, Fremont, Oakland.
This is also my experience on the East Coast. Usually people will say "Bay Area" and upon further probing I discover they're from Richmond or something.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,284 posts, read 26,292,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I'm with BigCityDreamer - I didn't even know Napa was in the Bay Area. I think of SF, Oakland, and maybe San Jose when I hear Bay Area. Outside of these, I know nothing else. I just googled the Bay Area - didn't know it was so large.
When I hear "Bay Area," I don't think of San Francisco only. I think of Silicon Valley (well known), Oakland (well known) and Napa (well known). Napa is one of the largest tourist destinations in the United States and I think a lot of people *do* realize it's in the Bay Area.

In a metro like DC, most people are only going to think about DC (specifically the National Mall) because that's all we really see and hear about. The same is true for the NYC area. New Jersey and Long Island are an afterthought even for NYC residents in a way the other places in the Bay Area aren't for SF residents.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:20 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,453,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I'm with BigCityDreamer - I didn't even know Napa was in the Bay Area. I think of SF, Oakland, and maybe San Jose when I hear Bay Area. Outside of these, I know nothing else. I just googled the Bay Area - didn't know it was so large.
I never really thought that Napa portrayed itself as being part of the Bay Area either. It always seems to advertise itself as "Wine Country" and not some suburb. And honestly it shouldn't either, not that many people commute from Napa into SF or the rest of the Bay Area. It's not that populated and there are no freeways connecting it, just some overly congested two lane roads.

And in the Bay Area most people don't look or talk about it like they do Oakland, San Jose, or other suburbs. It's seen as a weekend destination or day trip to "get away" from the Bay Area.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:23 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,538,210 times
Reputation: 17611
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
When I hear "Bay Area," I don't think of San Francisco only. I think of Silicon Valley (well known), Oakland (well known) and Napa (well known). Napa is one of the largest tourist destinations in the United States and I think a lot of people *do* realize it's in the Bay Area.

In a metro like DC, most people are only going to think about DC (specifically the National Mall) because that's all we really see and hear about. The same is true for the NYC area. New Jersey and Long Island are an afterthought even for NYC residents in a way the other places in the Bay Area aren't for SF residents.
I guess I do because the word "area" denotes more than one place, at least to me. Similar to "Tri-State Area." Edit: Sorry I misread that. I agree with you, I also don't think of SF only, and that is my reasoning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I never really thought that Napa portrayed itself as being part of the Bay Area either. It always seems to advertise itself as "Wine Country" and not some suburb. And honestly it shouldn't either, not that many people commute from Napa into SF or the rest of the Bay Area. It's not that populated and there are no freeways connecting it, just some overly congested two lane roads.

And in the Bay Area most people don't look or talk about it like they do Oakland, San Jose, or other suburbs. It's seen as a weekend destination or day trip to "get away" from the Bay Area.
I don't know the geography of Northern CA well at all (by that I mean, outside SF, where places are on the map) and I thought Napa was way north. Looking at the map of the Bay Area just now I was shocked it seems so close. Yeah, to me Napa has always been the epitome of Wine Country.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,284 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11744
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Usually people actually from the city of SF will say San Francisco from my experience, they tend to take a little extra pride in that.
I don't think I've ever met someone from San Francisco as in they were born there, went to high school there, etc. That's probably not the case if you live in California but it seems to be the case here. I went to college with a few kids who grew up in the East Bay and attended the vaunted College Preparatory School.

Brooklyn seems to be the opposite of the Bay Area cities in this respect. People seem to want to make it clear that they're not any regular old New Yorker; they're a Brooklynite first and foremost.
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