U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 05-17-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,462 posts, read 25,409,755 times
Reputation: 8936

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Look at the stock of people America was founded with; mostly from Europe. The European continent does not have a humid subtropical climate region like that found in the South, but it does have humid continental, and oceanic/Med climates (corresponding to the Northeast/Midwest and West Coast in US, respectively). Because of that, the South was the region with the climate most foreign to Europeans, and thus the climate they were least equipped to handle, hence the influx and economic growth in the South before air-conditioning. If the South was mostly populated with people from Asia, or Africa, which have regions of warm, humid climates just like that in the South, then the South would easily have contained huge thriving metropolises long before A/C was invented, since those people are better equipped to handle humid climates.
Yeah if only there were Africans in the American South before A/C....

 
Old 05-17-2015, 02:59 PM
 
4,812 posts, read 4,994,656 times
Reputation: 2276
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Wikipedia says the average high is above 80 degrees in LA in July, August, and September. Those months have highs in the mid 70s in San Diego.

Of course, that's comparing Downtown LA to San Diego International Airport. It looks like LAX is significantly colder - actually a few degrees cooler than San Diego International Airport. Western microclimates confuse me.
In Spring, Summer, and Fall:
In the LA basin, the coast(Santa Monica, Venice, LAX, Manhattan Beach, etc.) is on average 10-15 degrees cooler than downtown LA. A littler further from the coast eastward, (Westwood, Beverly Hills, Culver City, Torrance, Century City, West Hollywood) it's about 6-10 degrees cooler than downtown LA.

Think of the Pacific as an air conditioner, the warmer it is inland the more likely that A/C blows cool air eastward. This "A/C" will have moisture, low clouds fog and wind. Generally, the cooling will "stop cooling" when the temps are 60-65F in the LA Basin so nights are very comfortable not "chilly" as it is further north like in SF, where the night and low temps will be 50-55F in much of the Bay Area.
 
Old 05-17-2015, 04:42 PM
 
4,413 posts, read 1,640,943 times
Reputation: 1529
How is it like in Hawaii?
Is there a significant seasonal temperature change?
 
Old 05-17-2015, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Then why do wealthier nations/areas found in hot and humid climates like Singapore and Hong Kong have such widespread use of AC? Shouldn't they shun AC according to you?
Singapore's founder basically said the nation would not have become what it is today without air conditioning. It's hard to get a full productive day of work in a stiflingly hot, humid climate - which is why mid-afternoon "siestas" were historically common in many warmer cities.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 02:54 PM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,137,928 times
Reputation: 1850
Monterey, CA would be my choice. Last time I was there, 2012, the 4-star hotel we'd stayed at didn't even have A/C. Heat may be different, but you can always go with a fireplace.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 03:11 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,197,912 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Then why do wealthier nations/areas found in hot and humid climates like Singapore and Hong Kong have such widespread use of AC? Shouldn't they shun AC according to you?
For the same reason professional offices and districts in places like LA and San Diego have A/C. However, the existence of A/C units in such professional areas does not change the fact that one can live in such hot, humid climates without A/C.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Just because you're stuck living in a hot humid climate doesn't mean you will find areas with more mild climates like coastal CA too cool, just look at all the people that hate how hot and humid the South is.
People in the tropics throw on heavy coats in temps as warm as 60F; a lot of places in the West Coast don't get too much warmer than that at all year-round. Hence, conditions on the West Coast will be quite chilling for lots of people from the deep tropics for a greater portion of the year compared to such conditions in the Coastal South, which has a large portion of the year where 60F temps for lows just aren't possible. Hence, the Coastal South will be the climate those tropical people will feel more at home at without A/C than that of coastal California's.

Yes, some people who lived in the South all their lives despise the Southern climate; just like there are people who live in coastal California who despise even that climate. People have their preferences, says nothing about the kinds of lifestyle that generally can be possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
That's nice but it's still uncomfortably hot for most people in summer. You're delusional to try to believe otherwise.

And most people in the South don't live directly along the coast. But maybe those inland get those cooling breezes from all the tornadoes in some parts right? lol Such an extreme, violent climate down there.
Most people on Earth live in climates just as hot and humid as the South, and many are of the Asian race, a race especially adapted to handle such conditions, much better than Europeans can (Remember, Europe lacks a hot, humid subtropical region). But since America happened to be populated in a way that Europe was the mother continent, it soon became a country full of people ill-equipped to handle hot, humid climates, like that found in the South. Thus, the South was largely un-populated until the recent booms.

Lots of people in the South live on, or near the coast, enough to get periods of cooling, maritime sea-breezes. Look no further than places like Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Houston/Galveston, New Orleans, Mobile, Pensacola, Tampa, Miami, Daytona Beach, Jacksonville, Savannah, Charleston, etc. All such coastal cities exhibit lots of lush foliage for shade, as well as lots of thunderstorms to quench and cool the air. Skies in the coastal South are often never clear; always partly cloudy during summer, meaning time after time of relief from the burning hot sun through cloud cover.

Even the inland South exhibits some of these benefits, like thunderstorms, and lush foliage. Plus, the inland South is not humid like the Coastal South, and has nights quite cool enough for comfort. So either way, in the end, comfort is ensured in life without A/C in the South.

Only a specific portion of the South (Mid South, around the northern parts of Alabama and Mississippi, west Tennessee, etc) has high risk for tornadoes, especially violent kinds. In the rest of the South, however, the climate is as "violent" as that of all the paradises in the tropical/subtropical world, like Maldives, Seychelles, North New Zealand, Zanzibar, Brazil, South Africa, the east coast of Australia, etc. I know the South's epic thunderstorms can freak lots of people out, but those storms are maritime, tropical-style storms, not the same as the continental-influenced super-cells of the Great Plains, which are indeed violent. But storms, no matter what, always bring lots of rain, which many places out West surely could use some of, before the droughts and wildfires take off. Such an insidiously dangerous climate out there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Yeah if only there were Africans in the American South before A/C....
Unfortunately, most of the Black Africans in the South in those times were slaves, and thus were not free to build their own societies. But if there were enough Black Africans in the South that came free, and were connected with each other, they could have built thriving metropolises all without the need for A/C, since the Black African race has had countless generations of experience with hot, humid conditions in many parts of their continent, and thus, overtime, developed means by which to deal with such conditions. Asians as well, both South Asians and East Asians, also had such generational experiences with hot, humid climates, and thus have means to handle such climates. Whites, in contrast, did not have such climactic conditions on their continent (Europe, as well as western Asia), and thus lacked means to deal with such a climate.


Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Singapore's founder basically said the nation would not have become what it is today without air conditioning. It's hard to get a full productive day of work in a stiflingly hot, humid climate - which is why mid-afternoon "siestas" were historically common in many warmer cities.
And such a lifestyle would suit such climates well; one can still be productive with it. The Spanish had it right.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 04:11 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,462 posts, read 25,409,755 times
Reputation: 8936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
For the same reason professional offices and districts in places like LA and San Diego have A/C. However, the existence of A/C units in such professional areas does not change the fact that one can live in such hot, humid climates without A/C.
Ok but what about homes? Lots of homes in coastal Southern CA and the Bay Area do not have AC. Nearly all the homes in Singapore and Hong Kong do. So why aren't people in Singapore and Hong Kong LIVING without AC in their own HOMES?
Quote:
People in the tropics throw on heavy coats in temps as warm as 60F; a lot of places in the West Coast don't get too much warmer than that at all year-round. Hence, conditions on the West Coast will be quite chilling for lots of people from the deep tropics for a greater portion of the year compared to such conditions in the Coastal South, which has a large portion of the year where 60F temps for lows just aren't possible. Hence, the Coastal South will be the climate those tropical people will feel more at home at without A/C than that of coastal California's.
Ok that doesn't mean it's what they would actually prefer. Considering how wealthier nations in the tropics have widespread use of AC it's fair to assume they would not want to live in the South w/o it either.

Quote:
Yes, some people who lived in the South all their lives despise the Southern climate; just like there are people who live in coastal California who despise even that climate. People have their preferences, says nothing about the kinds of lifestyle that generally can be possible.
Yes everyone has their preferences and some will find coastal CA too cool, but based on surveys and generally what you hear from people coastal CA is a much preferred climate to the South b/c of how mild it is.
Quote:
Most people on Earth live in climates just as hot and humid as the South, and many are of the Asian race, a race especially adapted to handle such conditions, much better than Europeans can (Remember, Europe lacks a hot, humid subtropical region). But since America happened to be populated in a way that Europe was the mother continent, it soon became a country full of people ill-equipped to handle hot, humid climates, like that found in the South. Thus, the South was largely un-populated until the recent booms.
So the South's climate is that uncomfortable that they couldn't adapt at all?

Quote:
Lots of people in the South live on, or near the coast, enough to get periods of cooling, maritime sea-breezes. Look no further than places like Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Houston/Galveston, New Orleans, Mobile, Pensacola, Tampa, Miami, Daytona Beach, Jacksonville, Savannah, Charleston, etc. All such coastal cities exhibit lots of lush foliage for shade, as well as lots of thunderstorms to quench and cool the air. Skies in the coastal South are often never clear; always partly cloudy during summer, meaning time after time of relief from the burning hot sun through cloud cover.

Even the inland South exhibits some of these benefits, like thunderstorms, and lush foliage. Plus, the inland South is not humid like the Coastal South, and has nights quite cool enough for comfort. So either way, in the end, comfort is ensured in life without A/C in the South.
Sure but the majority of hte population and largest cities are inland.
Quote:
Only a specific portion of the South (Mid South, around the northern parts of Alabama and Mississippi, west Tennessee, etc) has high risk for tornadoes, especially violent kinds. In the rest of the South, however, the climate is as "violent" as that of all the paradises in the tropical/subtropical world, like Maldives, Seychelles, North New Zealand, Zanzibar, Brazil, South Africa, the east coast of Australia, etc. I know the South's epic thunderstorms can freak lots of people out, but those storms are maritime, tropical-style storms, not the same as the continental-influenced super-cells of the Great Plains, which are indeed violent. But storms, no matter what, always bring lots of rain, which many places out West surely could use some of, before the droughts and wildfires take off. Such an insidiously dangerous climate out there.
Brazil and South Africa do not have violent climates like the South. Hurricanes are extremely rare in both places and South Africa's climate is very similar to California's.

Judging by how many people die from weather related events it's pretty clear the South has the most dangerous climate in the nation and possibly continent.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Here and there....
224 posts, read 321,782 times
Reputation: 169
I lived in Mililani, Hawaii for 3 years with no heat and no AC. It could get pretty warm in the summers, I think the highest I saw inside our house was about 92, but it cools off as soon as the sun goes down. Coldest night I can remember was low 60's, my wife put a sweater on but I was still comfortable in shorts and my aloha shirt.

It varies alot over the different islands.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 07:03 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,197,912 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Ok but what about homes? Lots of homes in coastal Southern CA and the Bay Area do not have AC. Nearly all the homes in Singapore and Hong Kong do. So why aren't people in Singapore and Hong Kong LIVING without AC in their own HOMES?
Actually, many homes in those two cities don't have A/C either, nor do they have central heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Ok that doesn't mean it's what they would actually prefer. Considering how wealthier nations in the tropics have widespread use of AC it's fair to assume they would not want to live in the South w/o it either.
The Coastal South appeals much more to those from the tropics than coastal CA in terms of life without A/C; coastal CA would be too much of a climactic shift for those people, the South at least has the element of familiarity on its side.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Yes everyone has their preferences and some will find coastal CA too cool, but based on surveys and generally what you hear from people coastal CA is a much preferred climate to the South b/c of how mild it is.
All of which are products of the euro-centric nature of the US. Trust me, if the US was majority Asian or Black, you will not be hearing near as many complaints about heat and humidity, and instead of adversity, you would be hearing nothing but praise for the Southern climate. It seems to be something only White people complain about.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
So the South's climate is that uncomfortable that they couldn't adapt at all?
I'm sure the Europeans could adapt; its just that they have less efficient ways of doing so in comparison to Africans, and Asians. Again, the continent of Europe does not have a humid subtropical region like the US does in the South; thus, the Europeans had little/no experience with hot, humid climate regimes, and had little opportunity of developing lifestyles and designs suitable for such climates over generations, unlike Asians and Africans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Sure but the majority of hte population and largest cities are inland.
Well, Houston is the largest city in the American South (and 5th largest metro area in the country), and its on the coast. Also, New Orleans, Miami, Tampa, Savannah, and Charleston are no slouches when it comes to population. A significant proportion of the South's population lives right on/near the coast.

However, whether you are inland or coastal in the South, environmental factors always make sure comfort is present.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Brazil and South Africa do not have violent climates like the South. Hurricanes are extremely rare in both places and South Africa's climate is very similar to California's.

Judging by how many people die from weather related events it's pretty clear the South has the most dangerous climate in the nation and possibly continent.
What absolute nonsense.

The day-to-day summer climate in both Brazil and South Africa is just like the South, hot, humid summers with frequent dramatic, yet non-severe, thunderstorms. Just because those tropical thunderstorms put on spectacular light-shows doesn't mean they are violent.

Only South Africa's western coast has a Med climate like California; places like Capetown. The eastern part of the country, which includes cities like Durban, have a humid subtropical climate just like the South does.

In any city in the South, a hurricane risk can exist, but its not as if the cities are in constant onslaught by hurricanes; years, even decades, can pass between strikes. Also, with the level of warning systems and technology (like hurricane proof homes), hurricanes are increasingly becoming one of the safest natural disasters, in terms of prep time, and life-sparing; you can have days, even weeks, in advance of a storm, enough time to fortify the homes, evacuate, and perform other functions to achieve safety. Hurricanes are not that deadly at all in these times; they are basically just big rainstorms, the only real threat often times is storm surge for low-lying coastal areas (which can be buffered by formations as simple as sand dunes). And many people in the South are aware of that fact; that's why they throw parties during hurricanes. I don't see very many parties happening with tornadoes,wild-fires, blizzards, and earthquakes. So the only real major natural disaster threat the South is at risk of is one that you can party to; if I had to pick a poison in this country, it would be the South's. Very easy weather to deal with.

And by the way, wind speeds of a hurricane can be matched, even exceeded, by many storms from frontal weather systems, like Pacific storms, supercells, and nor'easters, of the West Coast, Midwest, and Northeast, respectively. So those other regions aren't much safer climates in that regard. On the other hand, the South does not suffer from epic, epic droughts that threaten to depopulate the region, or lofty wildfires, and mudslides, like the West does, nor does it suffer from tremendous blizzards and nor'easters that can knock out power, leaving people to shiver in cold without power, like the Northeast does. Its not like much of the region is constantly assaulted with hailstorms and mile-wide twisters, like the Midwest is. No, the most extreme thing the South has to worry about is basically a big rainstorm (as of this recent time).
 
Old 05-18-2015, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,088 posts, read 22,934,448 times
Reputation: 35212
I could live without heat where I am now, and I don't have A/C. The all-time record high here is 93 degrees. It got into the 30's overnight a few times this winter. Got into the 50's in my apartment and I turned on the heater maybe a half dozen times in December/January.

The normal year-round temps here are 60's/40's.

You could get this in Eureka, too, if you wanted a bigger town. I agree the Monterey would work. Santa Cruz, too.

I could live in SF without heat because I like it cool but it would be tougher in SF than on the coast, even way up here.

San Jose was HOT when I lived there from 2004 - 2014. I needed my A/C a lot there. Didn't need the heat much.

I lived in TN for 5 years and I would not be able to function without A/C there.

And I lived in Seattle and the Portland area and I disagree that you wouldn't need heat there. Lots of ice and snow. Brrrrr!
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top