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Old 05-18-2015, 08:51 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Actually, many homes in those two cities don't have A/C either, nor do they have central heat.
You sure about that?

"It wasn’t until the late 1980s, however, that it became common in most average households. By the late 1990s, most houses had it with the newer apartment buildings focusing more on installing air than balconies, as they had done in the past. There are even air conditioned units in some of the memorial parks in Singapore."
Singapore - Heating and Air-Conditioning | ExpatFocus.com

"High household AC penetration rates in Asian countries attest to the importance of this appliance. For example, 97% of homes in Hong Kong have at least one AC unit"
Introducing: The AC Series
Quote:
The Coastal South appeals much more to those from the tropics than coastal CA in terms of life without A/C; coastal CA would be too much of a climactic shift for those people, the South at least has the element of familiarity on its side.
Again, considering people in wealthier tropical nations like Singapore and Hong Kong cool their homes to temperatures commonly found on the West Coast, it's hard to imagine they would prefer to live in the South w/o AC versus coastal CA. If these people would prefer to live in the South w/o AC then why wouldn't they just live w/o AC where they are? That doesn't make any sense. Yes the climate is lot different but it's also a lot more comfortable for the majority of people no matter where they are from.
Quote:
All of which are products of the euro-centric nature of the US. Trust me, if the US was majority Asian or Black, you will not be hearing near as many complaints about heat and humidity, and instead of adversity, you would be hearing nothing but praise for the Southern climate. It seems to be something only White people complain about.
So by your logic then all the Black and Asian people in the South would prefer to live without AC then? So are they? Do black people not complain about the heat in the South?
Quote:
I'm sure the Europeans could adapt; its just that they have less efficient ways of doing so in comparison to Africans, and Asians. Again, the continent of Europe does not have a humid subtropical region like the US does in the South; thus, the Europeans had little/no experience with hot, humid climate regimes, and had little opportunity of developing lifestyles and designs suitable for such climates over generations, unlike Asians and Africans.
Well they sure seemed to adapt where they did settle in the South. New Orleans was one of the largest cities in the US at a time and many of the homes there were designed to deal with the climate.
Quote:
Well, Houston is the largest city in the American South (and 5th largest metro area in the country), and its on the coast. Also, New Orleans, Miami, Tampa, Savannah, and Charleston are no slouches when it comes to population. A significant proportion of the South's population lives right on/near the coast.
And all are very heavily air conditioned cities lol

Quote:
What absolute nonsense.

The day-to-day summer climate in both Brazil and South Africa is just like the South, hot, humid summers with frequent dramatic, yet non-severe, thunderstorms. Just because those tropical thunderstorms put on spectacular light-shows doesn't mean they are violent.
I was more referencing the hurricanes and tornadoes not seen in those places.

Quote:
Only South Africa's western coast has a Med climate like California; places like Capetown. The eastern part of the country, which includes cities like Durban, have a humid subtropical climate just like the South does.
Durban averages low 80's with the warmest month seeing a high of 82, what cities in the South have their warmest month average 82 for a high? Houston averages like 95 for it's hottest month, yeah that's the same thing lol

Quote:
In any city in the South, a hurricane risk can exist, but its not as if the cities are in constant onslaught by hurricanes; years, even decades, can pass between strikes. Also, with the level of warning systems and technology (like hurricane proof homes), hurricanes are increasingly becoming one of the safest natural disasters, in terms of prep time, and life-sparing; you can have days, even weeks, in advance of a storm, enough time to fortify the homes, evacuate, and perform other functions to achieve safety. Hurricanes are not that deadly at all in these times; they are basically just big rainstorms, the only real threat often times is storm surge for low-lying coastal areas (which can be buffered by formations as simple as sand dunes). And many people in the South are aware of that fact; that's why they throw parties during hurricanes. I don't see very many parties happening with tornadoes,wild-fires, blizzards, and earthquakes. So the only real major natural disaster threat the South is at risk of is one that you can party to; if I had to pick a poison in this country, it would be the South's. Very easy weather to deal with.

And by the way, wind speeds of a hurricane can be matched, even exceeded, by many storms from frontal weather systems, like Pacific storms, supercells, and nor'easters, of the West Coast, Midwest, and Northeast, respectively. So those other regions aren't much safer climates in that regard. On the other hand, the South does not suffer from epic, epic droughts that threaten to depopulate the region, or lofty wildfires, and mudslides, like the West does, nor does it suffer from tremendous blizzards and nor'easters that can knock out power, leaving people to shiver in cold without power, like the Northeast does. Its not like much of the region is constantly assaulted with hailstorms and mile-wide twisters, like the Midwest is. No, the most extreme thing the South has to worry about is basically a big rainstorm (as of this recent time).
Nothing that strikes the west coast would be stronger or comparable to anything aside from a Cat 1 hurricane.

New death map shows which weather kills most | cleveland.com
"The most dangerous places to live are much of the South, because of the heat risk, the hurricane coasts and the Great Plains states with their severe weather, Cutter said.

The south-central United States is also a dangerous area, with floods and tornadoes.

California is relatively safe, they found."

 
Old 05-18-2015, 09:09 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Honolulu probably has the most living without A/C and heat. [About half without A/C, all without heat]
 
Old 05-18-2015, 09:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Y

"High household AC penetration rates in Asian countries attest to the importance of this appliance. For example, 97% of homes in Hong Kong have at least one AC unit"
Introducing: The AC Series
Again, considering people in wealthier tropical nations like Singapore and Hong Kong cool their homes to temperatures commonly found on the West Coast, it's hard to imagine they would prefer to live in the South w/o AC versus coastal CA.
From what I read, A/C thermostats in East Asia are set relatively high — high 70s. Most homes in California are cooler than that inside except maybe in the summer.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 09:24 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,453 posts, read 25,397,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
From what I read, A/C thermostats in East Asia are set relatively high — high 70s. Most homes in California are cooler than that inside except maybe in the summer.
I wasn't really talking about the temp inside CA homes but the air temps of Coastal CA, which are in the 70's in summer.

I read this today:
“The temperature many Americans find most comfortable indoors in summer — 70 degrees — feels uncomfortable to most Europeans, who find it too cold,” said Mr. Sivak, who suggested that Europe’s greater environmental awareness might make people more inclined to put on an extra sweater in winter or tolerate a bit more heat in summer.

Unfortunately many tropical places — including Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong — seem to have followed the United States’ lead in cooling preferences, Mr. Tanabe said, holding cooler to be better."

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/19/su...dary.html?_r=0

I personally prefer not use AC actually and am not advocating it, I let my house get up to 80, but I know if I lived in the South I would use it a lot more.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 09:27 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I wasn't really talking about the temp inside CA homes but the air temps of Coastal CA, which are in the 70's in summer.

I read this today:
“The temperature many Americans find most comfortable indoors in summer — 70 degrees — feels uncomfortable to most Europeans, who find it too cold,” said Mr. Sivak, who suggested that Europe’s greater environmental awareness might make people more inclined to put on an extra sweater in winter or tolerate a bit more heat in summer.
hmm ok. How did that become the indoor summer ideal here? I wish it wasn't. I'd be much happier if it were warmer, say at least 75°F. I read an article that said something different about East Asia, but maybe it was about different countries.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 09:28 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I personally prefer not use AC actually and am not advocating it, I let my house get up to 80, but I know if I lived in the South I would use it a lot more.
I don't have A/C and it probably gets hotter than where you live, but I think I would get and use an A/C if I lived in the south, though maybe less than most locals.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 09:53 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,453 posts, read 25,397,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I don't have A/C and it probably gets hotter than where you live, but I think I would get and use an A/C if I lived in the south, though maybe less than most locals.
Average high where I live in July and August is about 87. Yeah it's a dry heat but still pretty warm, it cools down at night though and a window fan usually cools the our upstairs bedrooms pretty well.
 
Old 05-18-2015, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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Seattle needs heat during the winter, but does not need AC during the summer. (Except for 5 days on average). If you wan't to spend on AC, realize it is only going to be for five days. You be the judge. Better to just buy a fan and tough it out in 85 degree temps with 25% humidity. Seriously.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 12:47 AM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,196,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
You sure about that?

"It wasn’t until the late 1980s, however, that it became common in most average households. By the late 1990s, most houses had it with the newer apartment buildings focusing more on installing air than balconies, as they had done in the past. There are even air conditioned units in some of the memorial parks in Singapore."
Singapore - Heating and Air-Conditioning | ExpatFocus.com

"High household AC penetration rates in Asian countries attest to the importance of this appliance. For example, 97% of homes in Hong Kong have at least one AC unit"
Introducing: The AC Series
A/C might be present, yes, but it doesn't mean that it is being used.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Again, considering people in wealthier tropical nations like Singapore and Hong Kong cool their homes to temperatures commonly found on the West Coast, it's hard to imagine they would prefer to live in the South w/o AC versus coastal CA. If these people would prefer to live in the South w/o AC then why wouldn't they just live w/o AC where they are? That doesn't make any sense. Yes the climate is lot different but it's also a lot more comfortable for the majority of people no matter where they are from.
Even temps in the 60s are too cool for many people in the tropics; the West Coast, for a larger portion of the year, features such temps compared to the South, which at least has the advantage of familiarity. People in the tropics throw on coats in 60F weather; such temps are obviously quite cold for them, not all that comfortable at all. The South, in contrast, has a larger portion of the year where temps don't dip down to such chilly (to those people) levels, so it is more comfortable for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
So by your logic then all the Black and Asian people in the South would prefer to live without AC then? So are they? Do black people not complain about the heat in the South?
Depends on how much of the anti-heat and humidity Euro-centric claptrap has festered in their minds. Many Blacks and Asians from their respective homelands know of various techniques to handle hot and humid climates, passed down for generations. However, it is possible for generations of the two races born in a Euro-centric culture not to realize such techniques, and thus also lack knowledge about how to deal with a hot, humid climate without A/C. Such a culture will also ingrain in their minds how "undesirable" a hot, humid climate is.

But even so, from my experiences, its mostly white people that complain about heat and humidity in the South; the Blacks and Asians don't whine nearly as much, and many, in fact, like the climate, being reminded of their homelands.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Well they sure seemed to adapt where they did settle in the South. New Orleans was one of the largest cities in the US at a time and many of the homes there were designed to deal with the climate.
New Orleans was quite diverse even during those times, with lots of influences, including heavy amounts from Africa; who's to say that those Africans didn't teach those Europeans a thing or two about how to make permanent residence in a hot, humid climate.

Plus, that was during a time when America was more innovative and ambitious than it is now; it seems like in these recent decades, America just wants to be as cheap as possible. Such cheapness includes plopping A/C's into ugly McMansions, just to make large amounts of quick bucks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
And all are very heavily air conditioned cities lol
A side-effect of the cheap, euro-centric nature of the US.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I was more referencing the hurricanes and tornadoes not seen in those places.
And you wont have to worry about any real, deadly tornadoes in much of the South either. Hurricanes are a threat, yes, but its not a constant onslaught, and as technology improves and improves, the dangers of the storms can completely be nullified. Homes can become hurricane resistant, cloud-seeding tech can evolve to a point of completely disbanding a hurricane, etc. Remember the huge amounts of prep-time you get for hurricanes compared to other natural disasters, and also the fact that people throw parties in hurricanes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Durban averages low 80's with the warmest month seeing a high of 82, what cities in the South have their warmest month average 82 for a high? Houston averages like 95 for it's hottest month, yeah that's the same thing lol
The 95F temp for Houston comes from Bush Intl, the official airport, which is quite inland from the Gulf; temps in the CBD, closer to the coast only average 92F for the hottest month. Coastal areas of the Houston Metro don't get above 90F for the warmest month; daytime highs often stay in the 80F range.

Its worth noting, though, the strong UHI of the Houston Metro, due to all that concrete sprawl, and energy industry, that effects the city, and many surrounding areas. If such effects were nullified, you can easily see a distinct decrease in summer averages; even cities the size of New Orleans have experienced artificial heat, due UHI.

Durban is cooler than much of the South on average, yes, but it still has hefty amounts of humidity to make the climate muggy, just like the South. Both fall under the same humid subtropical climate zone. Nothing like California at all.

[quote=sav858;39670870]Nothing that strikes the west coast would be stronger or comparable to anything aside from a Cat 1 hurricane.

New death map shows which weather kills most | cleveland.com
"The most dangerous places to live are much of the South, because of the heat risk, the hurricane coasts and the Great Plains states with their severe weather, Cutter said.

The south-central United States is also a dangerous area, with floods and tornadoes.
Great Coastal Gale of 2007 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
137 mph winds on the West Coast, within Category 4 Hurricane levels.
Saffir

Utter bunk and claptrap. "Heat?" Please, the South is no hotter than many tropical locales of the world. Hurricanes? Can easily be escaped, to a point 100% of lives are spared, feature loads of prep-time, and can be partied to, unlike many other natural disasters. The Great Plains are Midwest, not South.



Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
California is relatively safe, they found."
Well, I guess super-droughts (which can make places straight up inhospitable), mudslides, epic wild-fires, and powerful Pacific windstorms aren't powerful at all. And locations in California see far more extreme heat than many places in the South will ever see. Looks like those researchers have more finding to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I personally prefer not use AC actually and am not advocating it, I let my house get up to 80, but I know if I lived in the South I would use it a lot more.
Its ironic how someone from the Bay Area is trying to say that A/C should the used in the South; being from the Bay Area, aren't you supposed to be a hardcore liberal environmentalist who would be doing everything in power to make sure energy isn't being wasted? And yet, here you are, admitting that you would be an energy hog upon visiting the South.

Don't be an Energy Hog:
 
Old 05-19-2015, 06:46 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Average high where I live in July and August is about 87. Yeah it's a dry heat but still pretty warm, it cools down at night though and a window fan usually cools the our upstairs bedrooms pretty well.
Average July high here is 83, August 81. Except our heat is more humid. What do your nights average? Ours are about 59°F. I think we're both living at the borderline where it's common not to have, or at least use A/C.
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