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Old 05-19-2015, 06:50 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Its ironic how someone from the Bay Area is trying to say that A/C should the used in the South; being from the Bay Area, aren't you supposed to be a hardcore liberal environmentalist who would be doing everything in power to make sure energy isn't being wasted? And yet, here you are, admitting that you would be an energy hog upon visiting the South.
Part of the reason the Bay Area has among the lowest per capita energy use isn't just more of a conservation mentality but a climate that require little heating or cooling. I remember visiting San Francisco in December; a lot of homes and shops didn't use heat and people were used to relying on sweaters. One day had a high in the upper 40s and shops had their windows open, possibly because the heat wouldn't keep up anyway if they had heat. Saves energy...

I knew someone from the Bay Area who moved to Manhattan (was a Prius driver before moving, too). He made sure to have A/C quickly after moving there; didn't care about living on a 4th floor walk-up, but A/C a must. Didn't like hot and humid, wasn't used to it.

 
Old 05-19-2015, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Washington State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MX City visiting View Post
Vast majority of America has very warm to hot summers that requires A/C and most of the country has enough chilly winter weather that requires heating. However, there are few cities where neither A/C nor heating is required vast majority of the time. Which city do you think offers the best of that?

San Diego, Los Angeles coastal areas comes to mind, and maybe San Francisco as well.
I don't think I could do without heat or AC in any city in the USA but probably bay Area would come closest for me as I like it cooler. Where I'm currently working in Arequipa, Peru, there is no need for ac or heat in my apartment...when it gets hot I open the window and when it gets cold I close it and that's year round and it's perfecto.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:30 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,462 posts, read 25,409,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
A/C might be present, yes, but it doesn't mean that it is being used.
Well considering about 30% of Singapore's household power and 40% of it's commercial power is used just for AC, it looks like it is being widely used.
Quote:
Even temps in the 60s are too cool for many people in the tropics; the West Coast, for a larger portion of the year, features such temps compared to the South, which at least has the advantage of familiarity. People in the tropics throw on coats in 60F weather; such temps are obviously quite cold for them, not all that comfortable at all. The South, in contrast, has a larger portion of the year where temps don't dip down to such chilly (to those people) levels, so it is more comfortable for them.
I'm sure many could easily adapt seeing how 60's and 70's are generally regarded as the ideal temperatures for humans to be around/in.
Quote:
Depends on how much of the anti-heat and humidity Euro-centric claptrap has festered in their minds. Many Blacks and Asians from their respective homelands know of various techniques to handle hot and humid climates, passed down for generations. However, it is possible for generations of the two races born in a Euro-centric culture not to realize such techniques, and thus also lack knowledge about how to deal with a hot, humid climate without A/C. Such a culture will also ingrain in their minds how "undesirable" a hot, humid climate is.

But even so, from my experiences, its mostly white people that complain about heat and humidity in the South; the Blacks and Asians don't whine nearly as much, and many, in fact, like the climate, being reminded of their homelands.
Or maybe they just realize how much better they have than their ancestors by having the CHOICE to cool their homes with AC.
Quote:
New Orleans was quite diverse even during those times, with lots of influences, including heavy amounts from Africa; who's to say that those Africans didn't teach those Europeans a thing or two about how to make permanent residence in a hot, humid climate.

Plus, that was during a time when America was more innovative and ambitious than it is now; it seems like in these recent decades, America just wants to be as cheap as possible. Such cheapness includes plopping A/C's into ugly McMansions, just to make large amounts of quick bucks.
Kind of surprised you think Europeans were somehow incapable of figuring out how to design buildings to suit the climate. I guess the mud huts of Africa were much more advanced huh?
Quote:
A side-effect of the cheap, euro-centric nature of the US.
Partly true but more of a side effect of living in a developed nation with a hot, humid climate that people find uncomfortable.
Quote:
And you wont have to worry about any real, deadly tornadoes in much of the South either. Hurricanes are a threat, yes, but its not a constant onslaught, and as technology improves and improves, the dangers of the storms can completely be nullified. Homes can become hurricane resistant, cloud-seeding tech can evolve to a point of completely disbanding a hurricane, etc. Remember the huge amounts of prep-time you get for hurricanes compared to other natural disasters, and also the fact that people throw parties in hurricanes.
After the midwest the South is the most deadly area for tornadoes.
INFOGRAPHIC: Which States Are Most Vulnerable for Tornado Deaths?
Quote:
The 95F temp for Houston comes from Bush Intl, the official airport, which is quite inland from the Gulf; temps in the CBD, closer to the coast only average 92F for the hottest month. Coastal areas of the Houston Metro don't get above 90F for the warmest month; daytime highs often stay in the 80F range.

Its worth noting, though, the strong UHI of the Houston Metro, due to all that concrete sprawl, and energy industry, that effects the city, and many surrounding areas. If such effects were nullified, you can easily see a distinct decrease in summer averages; even cities the size of New Orleans have experienced artificial heat, due UHI.
Even Galveston averages 90 for a high and 80 for a LOW

[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Nothing that strikes the west coast would be stronger or comparable to anything aside from a Cat 1 hurricane.

New death map shows which weather kills most | cleveland.com
"The most dangerous places to live are much of the South, because of the heat risk, the hurricane coasts and the Great Plains states with their severe weather, Cutter said.

The south-central United States is also a dangerous area, with floods and tornadoes.
Great Coastal Gale of 2007 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
137 mph winds on the West Coast, within Category 4 Hurricane levels.
Saffir
Those winds were sustained like they are in a hurricane though, kind of a big difference imo.

Quote:
Utter bunk and claptrap. "Heat?" Please, the South is no hotter than many tropical locales of the world. Hurricanes? Can easily be escaped, to a point 100% of lives are spared, feature loads of prep-time, and can be partied to, unlike many other natural disasters. The Great Plains are Midwest, not South.
So data and reality is "utter bunk"? Sorry that reality doesn't support this delusional idea you have about the climate in the South but it what it is. The South is one of the deadliest places to live as far as weather is concerned.
Quote:
Well, I guess super-droughts (which can make places straight up inhospitable), mudslides, epic wild-fires, and powerful Pacific windstorms aren't powerful at all. And locations in California see far more extreme heat than many places in the South will ever see. Looks like those researchers have more finding to do.
Compared to the South no they really aren't at all. So we're supposed to believe YOU over researchers and data? Very few people die from weather related events in CA, that's just a fact, especially compared to Southern states.
Quote:
Its ironic how someone from the Bay Area is trying to say that A/C should the used in the South; being from the Bay Area, aren't you supposed to be a hardcore liberal environmentalist who would be doing everything in power to make sure energy isn't being wasted? And yet, here you are, admitting that you would be an energy hog upon visiting the South.

Don't be an Energy Hog:
Just as much as you're supposed to be a redneck hillbilly married to your cousin being from the South. And don't worry, my home and AC would be solar powered anyways

I do agree though if homes were better designed it could reduce the need for AC although not eliminate it imo. I'm all for more energy efficiency by design. Lots of homes in CA are older, poorly designed, and not very well insulated but despite that they still don't really need AC because of how mild the climate is.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:32 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Well considering about 30% of Singapore's household power and 40% of it's commercial power is used just for AC, it looks like it is being widely used.
I'm sure many could easily adapt seeing how 60's and 70's are generally regarded as the ideal temperatures for humans to be around/in.
70s, perhaps. 60s, no unless people are used to wearing cooler weather clothing. In tropical countries, 60s is not a temperatures locals are used to
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:33 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I do agree though if homes were better designed it could reduce the need for AC although not eliminate it imo. I'm all for more energy efficiency by design. Lots of homes in CA are older, poorly designed, and not very well insulated but despite that they still don't really need AC because of how mild the climate is.
Poor insulation might not be a bad thing when heating needs are low or nonexistent, it prevents the house from becoming a heat trap. It's a terrible design here, of course.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:37 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,462 posts, read 25,409,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Average July high here is 83, August 81. Except our heat is more humid. What do your nights average? Ours are about 59F. I think we're both living at the borderline where it's common not to have, or at least use A/C.
Our lows those months are 58, so about the same. It does cool off, usually, pretty quickly when the sun goes down though with the lack of humidity.

I would say most homes in my area have AC although recently house hunting I was a bit surprised by how many didn't have it or didn't have central AC. It gets up into the 90's and around a 100 fairly regularly all summer, basically roller coasters between 75-95 all summer long on a fairly consistent basis.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,462 posts, read 25,409,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Poor insulation might not be a bad thing when heating needs are low or nonexistent, it prevents the house from becoming a heat trap. It's a terrible design here, of course.
I thought insulation was to help supposed to keep it cool during summer somehow?

Winter nights are commonly in the 30's and low 40's so we definitely use heat while awake but don't usually sleep with it on.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:41 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,462 posts, read 25,409,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
70s, perhaps. 60s, no unless people are used to wearing cooler weather clothing. In tropical countries, 60s is not a temperatures locals are used to
Yeah but it's not exactly an extreme temperature that's hard to adapt to either. It may be cool at first but after would become pretty comfortable imo, as long as the wind isn't too strong at least.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:48 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Our lows those months are 58, so about the same. It does cool off, usually, pretty quickly when the sun goes down though with the lack of humidity.

I would say most homes in my area have AC although recently house hunting I was a bit surprised by how many didn't have it or didn't have central AC. It gets up into the 90's and around a 100 fairly regularly all summer, basically roller coasters between 75-95 all summer long on a fairly consistent basis.
New England was rather slow at adopting A/C, and the house stock is old, so most homes don't have central A/C. Most have room air conditioners, but a significant minority don't have them. With our cooler lows and more moderate humidity, I'd say our summers are the most western you can get east of the Mississippi, though our summers are obviously much too wet, but we do get clear deep blue skies that are less common in the more sticky humid places to the south.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 09:50 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I thought insulation was to help supposed to keep it cool during summer somehow?
Insulation will help prevent the hot afternoon air from coming in the afternoon. But if you're problem is that it's hotter inside than outside (common upstairs) and outside isn't that hot, letting outside air in instead of blocking it would be helpful. Insulation matters much more winter, as heat transfer rate is proportional to the difference in temperature. 75F inside and 90F outside is a much smaller difference than 20F outside and 65F inside.
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