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Old 05-19-2015, 07:28 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,201,046 times
Reputation: 1329

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Well considering about 30% of Singapore's household power and 40% of it's commercial power is used just for AC, it looks like it is being widely used.
I guess. However, there are STILL ways to keep the home cool in hot, humid climates without A/C, and many more means can be found as well if people don't slave themselves to the A/C.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I'm sure many could easily adapt seeing how 60's and 70's are generally regarded as the ideal temperatures for humans to be around/in.
Who is the expert that conceived that notion? There are various types of humans, including many from the tropics that would shiver upon experiencing those temps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Or maybe they just realize how much better they have than their ancestors by having the CHOICE to cool their homes with AC.
And they would ditch that A/C if they KNEW how their ancestors kept their homes cool without WASTING energy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Kind of surprised you think Europeans were somehow incapable of figuring out how to design buildings to suit the climate. I guess the mud huts of Africa were much more advanced huh?
In terms of utilizing the natural features of the climate to cool the home, those "mud huts" in Africa actually are quite efficient, much better than the ugly McMansions being thrown-up in much of the US for quite some time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Partly true but more of a side effect of living in a developed nation with a hot, humid climate that people find uncomfortable.
Yeah, people who are unprepared for the climate.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
After the midwest the South is the most deadly area for tornadoes.
INFOGRAPHIC: Which States Are Most Vulnerable for Tornado Deaths?
And its only a specific region of the South (the Mid-South around Tennessee, as well as northern parts of Alabama and Mississippi) that allows the South to achieve such a rank. The rest of the South outside that part does not get real destructive tornadoes at all.

Just like how the US is the country with the most tornadoes, with that designation only being possible due to the country containing the Great Plains, which is a prime area for tornado development.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Even Galveston averages 90 for a high and 80 for a LOW
Like I said, the Houston Metro UHI has rose temp averages artificially by some degrees. Mitigate that influence, and summer averages will be much cooler.

With that said, 90F isn't really that hot at all, especially with cooling sea-breezes, and thunderstorms being present. Many tropical island paradises average warmer temps than 90F.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Those winds were sustained like they are in a hurricane though, kind of a big difference imo.
Yep, they were sustained, like they are in hurricanes. No difference to be seen.

No matter how the winds came to the West Coast, though, they still approached speeds that surpassed many hurricanes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
So data and reality is "utter bunk"? Sorry that reality doesn't support this delusional idea you have about the climate in the South but it what it is. The South is one of the deadliest places to live as far as weather is concerned.

Compared to the South no they really aren't at all. So we're supposed to believe YOU over researchers and data? Very few people die from weather related events in CA, that's just a fact, especially compared to Southern states.
A trait most logical thinkers share is that they just don't just accept something as the gospel just because its written as a formal document; such data and research is created by humans just like you and I, and thus, is not immune to mistakes, skews, and flaws.

There are different types of "deadly." Natural disasters like Hurricanes can be upfront deadly in terms of sheer power, and force, but unlike other natural disasters, they can easily be prepared for quite some time in advance, either through evacuation, or fortification. Disasters like drought, on the other hand, are more insidious, and can easily be disguised, but the damage and destruction that can be wrought to the environment can be quite severe, all without people even being aware until it is too late.

Even if more people die from weather events in the South vs California, that really doesn't say much about how prone the South is to natural disasters; access to means of escape, education, infrastructure, etc all contribute just as much to that circumstance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Just as much as you're supposed to be a redneck hillbilly married to your cousin being from the South. And don't worry, my home and AC would be solar powered anyways

I do agree though if homes were better designed it could reduce the need for AC although not eliminate it imo. I'm all for more energy efficiency by design. Lots of homes in CA are older, poorly designed, and not very well insulated but despite that they still don't really need AC because of how mild the climate is.
Only except I'm not from the South; I've lived around the world in all sorts of subtropical/tropical regions, from Durban in South Africa, to Florainopolis in Brazil, and I have seen the natural means by which people use to keep cool without having to resort to energy-wasting A/Cs. Now, however, I live in the southern US, in Houston, TX, and it saddens me to see people having to act like such Energy Hogs that they have room temps down to chilly enough conditions to need a sweater (using a sweater in the MIDDLE OF SUMMER). There is no need for such energy wasting; there a ways to cool the home to appropriate temps without using A/C, and unlike A/C, those ways don't overdo the cooling.

As long as any home has the ability to use the natural features of the climate to cool down, A/C will not be needed at all, whether in coastal CA, or in the Coastal South.

 
Old 05-19-2015, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,026,385 times
Reputation: 3829
When our winter electric bill is a whopping $30 (there are days when you do need heat) and when you don't need AC in the summer and stay cool with a nice ocean breeze, I would say Huntington Beach, CA is a pretty good.
 
Old 05-19-2015, 08:17 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,429,588 times
Reputation: 8936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
I guess. However, there are STILL ways to keep the home cool in hot, humid climates without A/C, and many more means can be found as well if people don't slave themselves to the A/C.
No one is denying that but simple fact is people prefer AC over those methods. And I agree that it's not really a good thing for the environment.
Quote:
Who is the expert that conceived that notion? There are various types of humans, including many from the tropics that would shiver upon experiencing those temps.
Scientists, look up "ambient temperature". Sure they might shiver at first but it's not a hard temperature range to adapt to.
Quote:
And they would ditch that A/C if they KNEW how their ancestors kept their homes cool without WASTING energy.
A lot of people are still alive before AC was used and they still choose AC. AC cools homes much more effectively than any natural method can.
Quote:
In terms of utilizing the natural features of the climate to cool the home, those "mud huts" in Africa actually are quite efficient, much better than the ugly McMansions being thrown-up in much of the US for quite some time.
Sure but no one wants to live in a mud hut, probably not even the Africans either lol.
Quote:
Yeah, people who are unprepared for the climate.
Or they just realize how much better AC is, at least for comfort.
Quote:
And its only a specific region of the South (the Mid-South around Tennessee, as well as northern parts of Alabama and Mississippi) that allows the South to achieve such a rank. The rest of the South outside that part does not get real destructive tornadoes at all.

Just like how the US is the country with the most tornadoes, with that designation only being possible due to the country containing the Great Plains, which is a prime area for tornado development.
Oh okay so we should ignore those parts then or what?
Quote:
Like I said, the Houston Metro UHI has rose temp averages artificially by some degrees. Mitigate that influence, and summer averages will be much cooler.

With that said, 90F isn't really that hot at all, especially with cooling sea-breezes, and thunderstorms being present. Many tropical island paradises average warmer temps than 90F.
So if there was no city there then it would be more tolerable? Gotcha!
Quote:
Yep, they were sustained, like they are in hurricanes. No difference to be seen.

No matter how the winds came to the West Coast, though, they still approached speeds that surpassed many hurricanes.
Actually they were NOT sustained winds as they were GUSTS, read your article a little closer.
Quote:
A trait most logical thinkers share is that they just don't just accept something as the gospel just because its written as a formal document; such data and research is created by humans just like you and I, and thus, is not immune to mistakes, skews, and flaws.

There are different types of "deadly." Natural disasters like Hurricanes can be upfront deadly in terms of sheer power, and force, but unlike other natural disasters, they can easily be prepared for quite some time in advance, either through evacuation, or fortification. Disasters like drought, on the other hand, are more insidious, and can easily be disguised, but the damage and destruction that can be wrought to the environment can be quite severe, all without people even being aware until it is too late.

Even if more people die from weather events in the South vs California, that really doesn't say much about how prone the South is to natural disasters; access to means of escape, education, infrastructure, etc all contribute just as much to that circumstance.
Feel free to present data or reports showing something different.
Quote:
Only except I'm not from the South; I've lived around the world in all sorts of subtropical/tropical regions, from Durban in South Africa, to Florainopolis in Brazil, and I have seen the natural means by which people use to keep cool without having to resort to energy-wasting A/Cs. Now, however, I live in the southern US, in Houston, TX, and it saddens me to see people having to act like such Energy Hogs that they have room temps down to chilly enough conditions to need a sweater (using a sweater in the MIDDLE OF SUMMER). There is no need for such energy wasting; there a ways to cool the home to appropriate temps without using A/C, and unlike A/C, those ways don't overdo the cooling.

As long as any home has the ability to use the natural features of the climate to cool down, A/C will not be needed at all, whether in coastal CA, or in the Coastal South.
Well I agree and wish homes all over the place were built more efficiently, especially in such an extreme climate like the South. It is what it is though and the South is a very intolerable place to live without AC as it currently is. California, despite all of the poorly built/designed homes in the last half century, is a much better place to live without AC currently and this thread is about the "best" places.
 
Old 05-20-2015, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Lake George, CO
371 posts, read 428,023 times
Reputation: 374
I will run run run run run run MY AC because I can and because I hate the heat and humidity and anything over 80 outside is extremely hot to me!!! Even people who like this climate run their ACs like crazy! If you do not like people in miserable Houston using their AC, then get out and live with like minded people somewhere else or stop proclaiming how "saddened" you are!
 
Old 05-22-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,201,046 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
No one is denying that but simple fact is people prefer AC over those methods. And I agree that it's not really a good thing for the environment.
There is no telling that; it just shows percentages, and shows nothing of how the people feel about A/C directly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Scientists, look up "ambient temperature". Sure they might shiver at first but it's not a hard temperature range to adapt to.
Those temps would equate to a chilly day for many tropical people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
A lot of people are still alive before AC was used and they still choose AC. AC cools homes much more effectively than any natural method can.
Depends on the circumstances those specific people were subjected to. If homes were not properly designed, then yes, it would not feel great without A/C; heat would be trapped, and it would feel uncomfortable. However, those who had the luxury of living in a home properly designed for the climate would not be as inclined to use A/C.

And as far as cooling a home to optimal levels, natural methods are actually as effective as A/C, even more so if you consider how wasteful A/C is, and also how people, often times overdo the A/C, to the point that a sweater is needed in the room, because it is so chilly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Sure but no one wants to live in a mud hut, probably not even the Africans either lol.
Of course not; just stating that mud huts are quite efficient in utilizing the natural climate features to cool the home.

And mud buildings can be quite grand; ever heard of Timbuktu?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Or they just realize how much better AC is, at least for comfort.
Better for unprepared people. However, people who are prepared would not be as inclined to abuse the A/C.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Oh okay so we should ignore those parts then or what?
Just saying that we should keep in mind that the particular part of the South in question, the Dixie Alley, with the loads of tornadoes, is not representative of the entire region at all. The US is the country with the most tornadoes, due to containing the Great Plains; however, that doesn't detract from the fact that the country has locations with great climates, like the coastal South, coastal California, Hawaii, etc. In much the same way, the Dixie Alley in one part of the South does not detract from how safe climate wise the rest of the region is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
So if there was no city there then it would be more tolerable? Gotcha
No, I said if UHI was mitigated. For example, if more trees were planted in certain areas, or on top of sky-scrapers, and if walkable-urban design was emphasized rather than sprawl, then UHI would be mitigated.

Much of the Houston area's heat is artificial due to all the sprawl. Mitigate the UHI effects enough, and you will see average highs in the 80s for central city, and Galveston's would be even lower.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Actually they were NOT sustained winds as they were GUSTS, read your article a little closer.
No matter how you slice it, storms with wind-speeds matching CAT 4 hurricane levels have occurred on the West Coast, and the threat of such storms exists every El-Nino cycle.

Plus, the sustained winds would not be all that much lower either, if any.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Feel free to present data or reports showing something different.
Just use your natural logic and common sense, and you will understand what I am saying. But, if you want to be spoon-fed, I will provide data for you soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Well I agree and wish homes all over the place were built more efficiently, especially in such an extreme climate like the South. It is what it is though and the South is a very intolerable place to live without AC as it currently is. California, despite all of the poorly built/designed homes in the last half century, is a much better place to live without AC currently and this thread is about the "best" places.
The South's got lots of water, rain-storms to quench and cool the air frequently, verdant vegetation, both natural and planted, for shade, sea-breezes along the coast, and lots of clouds in the sky to pass over the sun, offering relief (summer skies in the South are rarely clear; good so the sun isn't constantly beating down on you). Too much comfort to be considered "extreme." If you want to call the South extreme, you should be going on, and calling all the paradises of the tropical/subtropical world extreme. I guess Maldives, Seychelles, many Caribbean islands, etc would be "too extreme" in your book, correct?

If a home without A/C ANYWHERE (yes, even coastal California) lacks measures to cool it down, its going to get quite stuffy and uncomfortable inside. You need some method of getting air to circulate.

Remember, there are many different types of people; what's best for one person could be uncomfortable for another. So while coastal California is oft stated to be the best place for living without A/C, for people from the tropics, I'd say the coastal South would at least have the element of familiarity to them, and thus easier for them to adapt to in life without A/C.
 
Old 05-22-2015, 03:00 PM
 
526 posts, read 463,042 times
Reputation: 1386
I'm in florida and I don't care if God himself designs the most natural cool house know to man, I would stick hook AC up to it. Way to hot and humid to even consider anything else. I could make do with out heat in the winter if need be though, I think I turned it on maybe 4 times last winter and only bc the girlfriend was bitching
 
Old 05-22-2015, 04:36 PM
 
1,197 posts, read 878,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
No, I said if UHI was mitigated. For example, if more trees were planted in certain areas, or on top of sky-scrapers, and if walkable-urban design was emphasized rather than sprawl, then UHI would be mitigated.

Much of the Houston area's heat is artificial due to all the sprawl. Mitigate the UHI effects enough, and you will see average highs in the 80s for central city, and Galveston's would be even lower.
With every comment you make, it becomes clear that you don't have much first hand experience with many of the places you are commenting on. While the Western suburbs don't have many trees, much of the rest of Houston is heavily forested. When you fly in, you can barely see houses for all of the trees.

Galveston is 25 miles from the edge of Houston's sprawl, enough that UHI would have minimal effect. The sea breezes aren't cool and refreshing in Galveston, except in Winter, when you don't need cooling. That avg high of 90 means about half the time it's hotter. The part you've ignored in all your posts is the heat index, and in Galveston with >90% humidity most of the summer it is miserable. I'm tolerant of higher temperatures than most people, but AC is needed if former no other reason than to dehumidify. Without it everything gets musty and moldy.

You also don't seem to have any firsthand knowledge of the tropics or Asia. I lived in a poorer area of the tropics off the coast of Asia, and I will vouch that AC is widely used in wealthy areas like Hong Kong and Singapore. In Manila it was used in business, and people who could afford it used it at home. Many of my less well off co-workers would complain of how hot it was in their apts and how they couldn't sleep because of the heat. While where I lived many had an AC unit , electricity was too expensive for most to use it on all but the hottest days. People with enough money ran it all the time. You don't see people wanting to live without AC anymore than you see people wanting to live without running water, TV, or cell phones.

As far as temps being too cold for people in the tropics to tolerate in SoCal, with the exception of Southern Florida and the Rio Grande Valley, it gets colder along most of the Gulf Coast than it does in SoCal in winter. Maybe the summer weather in the SE has more in common with the weather in the tropics (although it rarely got above 90 where I lived in the tropics), but the winter weather in SoCal is warmer than Gulf Coast.
 
Old 05-22-2015, 06:37 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,201,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
With every comment you make, it becomes clear that you don't have much first hand experience with many of the places you are commenting on. While the Western suburbs don't have many trees, much of the rest of Houston is heavily forested. When you fly in, you can barely see houses for all of the trees.

Galveston is 25 miles from the edge of Houston's sprawl, enough that UHI would have minimal effect. The sea breezes aren't cool and refreshing in Galveston, except in Winter, when you don't need cooling. That avg high of 90 means about half the time it's hotter. The part you've ignored in all your posts is the heat index, and in Galveston with >90% humidity most of the summer it is miserable. I'm tolerant of higher temperatures than most people, but AC is needed if former no other reason than to dehumidify. Without it everything gets musty and moldy.
Oh please, my friend, I have lived in many a subtropical/tropical region in the world, from South Africa, to Brazil, to the Southern US.

I never said that Houston wasn't forested; I was saying that the effects of UHI in the city can be mitigated by planting trees/plants in areas they weren't present before. For example, trees can be planted on top of skyscrapers to counteract the added heat from the buildings' materials. Or grass can be planted right on asphalt/concrete roads:
PHOTOS: Europe's Grass-Lined Green Railways = Good Urban Design | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

With the urban sprawl of the Houston area, the influence of Houston's UHI can extend even to Galveston. And remember the effects of all the petrochemical/industrial facilities and plants in parts of Galveston Bay in Houston. All that would then reveal that Houston's temps have a significant artificial component to them; summers would be markedly cooler if the effects of UHI were mitigated.

If even New Orleans experienced marked rise in summer temps from UHI, then Houston definitely experienced such an artificial rise as well.

With that said, with loads of trees, thunderstorms, and sea-breezes, Houston, Galveston, and the rest of the coastal South are quite comfortable. Sea-breezes in Galveston are cool and refreshing, don't know what you are talking about there. Even if the Gulf water is warm, the sea-breeze will always be cool relative to the land, and thus feel refreshing.

Averages aren't always half and half, and mythical as people make them out to be, especially in ocean-moderated cities; it's not like half of all summer days in Galveston reach 95F, and the other half are 85F. Most summer days in Galveston are within 2F of the average. Galveston has only 39 days where temps are equal to, or greater than 90F:
Texas Climate Top 10 Lists

Summers in subtropical climates have much more temp stability than winters; summer days aren't going to contain as significant deviations from averages as winters are.

Heat Index doesn't really do a good job of factoring in the effects of sea-breeze, and swift wind:
THE 6 FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE HUMAN OUTSIDE COMFORT

90% humidity in Galveston does not occur during the day:
https://weatherspark.com/averages/30...-United-States
The Humidity Deception

So, with thunderstorms, lush vegetation, lots off fluffy, wuffy clouds in the sky for covering the sun, and swift sea-breezes near the coast, there is no reason the South is not comfortable at all without A/C.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
You also don't seem to have any firsthand knowledge of the tropics or Asia. I lived in a poorer area of the tropics off the coast of Asia, and I will vouch that AC is widely used in wealthy areas like Hong Kong and Singapore. In Manila it was used in business, and people who could afford it used it at home. Many of my less well off co-workers would complain of how hot it was in their apts and how they couldn't sleep because of the heat. While where I lived many had an AC unit , electricity was too expensive for most to use it on all but the hottest days. People with enough money ran it all the time. You don't see people wanting to live without AC anymore than you see people wanting to live without running water, TV, or cell phones.
To be fair, Asian countries have taken up a lot of western ideals as of late, including an affinity for A/C when they weren't used in the past. In my experiences in many tropical/subtropical climates, homes without A/C units were actually quite comfortable, so far the home had some means of keeping circulation of air.

And in my experiences living in the coastal South, whites seem to complain about heat and humidity the most; asians and blacks don't complain as much. In fact, many asians and blacks have been moving to the South precisely because the hot, humid climate reminded them of home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
As far as temps being too cold for people in the tropics to tolerate in SoCal, with the exception of Southern Florida and the Rio Grande Valley, it gets colder along most of the Gulf Coast than it does in SoCal in winter. Maybe the summer weather in the SE has more in common with the weather in the tropics (although it rarely got above 90 where I lived in the tropics), but the winter weather in SoCal is warmer than Gulf Coast.
Don't be fooled by these recent winters with polar vortexes and periods of below average temp in the East US; the coastal South, at a natural climactic state, at minimum, is as warm as SoCal is during winter. Winters in recent times have largely been colder than normal in the Eastern US, due to the dominant pattern of the jet-stream during the time period, which favored a dip over the Eastern US. All these cold spells have been factored into the winter-averages of the Southeast, skewing them to be colder than winter temps in SoCal. Allow a period of more normal conditions in the coastal South, and temps will be as warm as SoCal, or even warmer.

Even at that, though, in terms of winter averages, the coastal South (apart from Florida, and South Texas) is pretty much neck-in-neck with SoCal, give or take a few degrees. That means that though the South received some coolish spells during the period, it also had many winter days with warm temps, up to even 80F. Majority of days during a coastal South winter, however, are within a few degrees of the mild averages, usually 60s for highs, and 40s for lows, for large parts of the region. I could go more in detail with all of this, but that is for another topic. If you want to continue, I will start a new thread where we can discuss such matters, or you could hit up my inbox.

Even if the winters are cooler on average then in SoCal, the South still has a larger portion of the overall year where temps/conditions match those of the tropics (warmer summers, falls and springs than SoCal), thus allowing for greater familiarity for the tropical people, compared to SoCal. This was more where I was getting at anyway when I talked of familiarity.

P.S.: the average temps of many locations in the South are no different than what is seen in many tropical locations. They all have highs in their warmest month either from mid/upper 80s to low 90s.
 
Old 05-23-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,429,588 times
Reputation: 8936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
There is no telling that; it just shows percentages, and shows nothing of how the people feel about A/C directly.
It shows there is demand for it
Quote:
Those temps would equate to a chilly day for many tropical people.
At first yes and for some yeah probably always but still not a hard temperature to adjust to for most people imo.
Quote:
Depends on the circumstances those specific people were subjected to. If homes were not properly designed, then yes, it would not feel great without A/C; heat would be trapped, and it would feel uncomfortable. However, those who had the luxury of living in a home properly designed for the climate would not be as inclined to use A/C.

And as far as cooling a home to optimal levels, natural methods are actually as effective as A/C, even more so if you consider how wasteful A/C is, and also how people, often times overdo the A/C, to the point that a sweater is needed in the room, because it is so chilly.
You still see AC retrofitted into homes that were built to adapt to the weather. People clearly preferred the convenience of having AC despite their home being designed to better deal with hot and humid weather.
Quote:
Better for unprepared people. However, people who are prepared would not be as inclined to abuse the A/C.
Well if you have to take all these steps to "prepare" for a climate then it's probably not a very optimal climate to begin with.
Quote:
Just saying that we should keep in mind that the particular part of the South in question, the Dixie Alley, with the loads of tornadoes, is not representative of the entire region at all. The US is the country with the most tornadoes, due to containing the Great Plains; however, that doesn't detract from the fact that the country has locations with great climates, like the coastal South, coastal California, Hawaii, etc. In much the same way, the Dixie Alley in one part of the South does not detract from how safe climate wise the rest of the region is.
Yes some parts have great climates and other parts have great climates with a chance of severe weather lol
Quote:
No, I said if UHI was mitigated. For example, if more trees were planted in certain areas, or on top of sky-scrapers, and if walkable-urban design was emphasized rather than sprawl, then UHI would be mitigated.

Much of the Houston area's heat is artificial due to all the sprawl. Mitigate the UHI effects enough, and you will see average highs in the 80s for central city, and Galveston's would be even lower.
Not sure if a "walkable-urban design" would necessarily help for UHI as it tends to be denser development and more concrete.

So what smaller cities not affected with the effects of UHI have highs in the 80's during summer in the South?
Quote:
No matter how you slice it, storms with wind-speeds matching CAT 4 hurricane levels have occurred on the West Coast, and the threat of such storms exists every El-Nino cycle.

Plus, the sustained winds would not be all that much lower either, if any.
Sustained winds of that speed are going to do A LOT more damage than gusts. And yes the sustained winds are a lot lower, at worst probably similar to a tropical storm.
Quote:
Just use your natural logic and common sense, and you will understand what I am saying. But, if you want to be spoon-fed, I will provide data for you soon.
Ok well lets see it then.
Quote:
The South's got lots of water, rain-storms to quench and cool the air frequently, verdant vegetation, both natural and planted, for shade, sea-breezes along the coast, and lots of clouds in the sky to pass over the sun, offering relief (summer skies in the South are rarely clear; good so the sun isn't constantly beating down on you). Too much comfort to be considered "extreme." If you want to call the South extreme, you should be going on, and calling all the paradises of the tropical/subtropical world extreme. I guess Maldives, Seychelles, many Caribbean islands, etc would be "too extreme" in your book, correct?
Extreme enough where I probably would not want to live in any of those places without AC either. And while the South shares some similarities with the climates of those places it's not the same.
Quote:
If a home without A/C ANYWHERE (yes, even coastal California) lacks measures to cool it down, its going to get quite stuffy and uncomfortable inside. You need some method of getting air to circulate.
You mean windows? Yeah pretty sure nowhere lacks those things.

Quote:
Remember, there are many different types of people; what's best for one person could be uncomfortable for another. So while coastal California is oft stated to be the best place for living without A/C, for people from the tropics, I'd say the coastal South would at least have the element of familiarity to them, and thus easier for them to adapt to in life without A/C.
Yes I'm sure that would help but considering all the people that have the means to use AC in the tropics do so it's a safe bet they would also want to use it in the South.
 
Old 05-23-2015, 06:27 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,201,046 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
It shows there is demand for it
Again, those percentages don't necessarily reflect the true opinions people have about A/C, and whether or not they deem it necessary.

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
At first yes and for some yeah probably always but still not a hard temperature to adjust to for most people imo.
Yeah, they can adjust to it; doesn't mean that they still won't find it too chilly.


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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
You still see AC retrofitted into homes that were built to adapt to the weather. People clearly preferred the convenience of having AC despite their home being designed to better deal with hot and humid weather.
And many more homes still stay the way they are, without any alterations. There are plenty of people who like the feel of heat and humidity, contrary to popular belief.

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Well if you have to take all these steps to "prepare" for a climate then it's probably not a very optimal climate to begin with.
Don't kid yourself; steps have to be taken to prepare for ANY climate.

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Yes some parts have great climates and other parts have great climates with a chance of severe weather lol
Same goes for California, the US as a whole, and for many locations in the world.

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Not sure if a "walkable-urban design" would necessarily help for UHI as it tends to be denser development and more concrete.
False, with walkable design vs sprawl, there is less concrete being used, with less area covered by concrete as well. Thus, any UHI influence would be more localized. But if you then do acts like planting trees, gardens, etc on top of skyscrapers, or planting grass on the streets, then UHI can easily be mitigated:
PHOTOS: Europe's Grass-Lined Green Railways = Good Urban Design | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
So what smaller cities not affected with the effects of UHI have highs in the 80's during summer in the South?
Plenty. Even the places handicapped by UHI still have highs only in the 80s on the warmest month:
Cape Hatteras - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Charleston, South Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dauphin Island, Alabama - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Galveston, Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (climate chart does not go above 89F)
Miami Beach, Florida - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Boone, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia in warmest month not even out of the 70s)
Asheville, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Louisville, Kentucky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Knoxville, Tennessee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Destin, Florida - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pensacola, Florida - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Sustained winds of that speed are going to do A LOT more damage than gusts. And yes the sustained winds are a lot lower, at worst probably similar to a tropical storm.
True, but to be fair, many cities in the South are already aware of the hurricane/windstorm threat, and thus have building codes that ensure that structures are strong enough to withstand hurricanes. Furthermore, people are already more familiar with the processes necessary to avoid hurricane damage. In contrast, people are less aware of just how powerful those Pacific low-pressure storms can be, and can be caught off-guard when they strike, resulting in lots of destruction.

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
You mean windows? Yeah pretty sure nowhere lacks those things.
You are going to need more than just windows to circulate air around the ENTIRE house.

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Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Yes I'm sure that would help but considering all the people that have the means to use AC in the tropics do so it's a safe bet they would also want to use it in the South.
And considering that there are people used to living without A/C in the tropics, where heat and humidity is year round, its also a safe bet that they would be doing so easily in the South, as the time of heat and humidity is less.
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