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View Poll Results: How long does it take you to get used to a new place completely?
The first day 6 13.04%
A few weeks 5 10.87%
A few months 3 6.52%
6-12 months 11 23.91%
Up to 2 years 12 26.09%
Up to 3 years 1 2.17%
Over 3 years 6 13.04%
I can never get used to anyplace new 2 4.35%
Voters: 46. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-15-2015, 11:20 PM
 
Location: North Texas
1,743 posts, read 962,841 times
Reputation: 1568

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It doesn't take me long at all. Maybe a few days or a couple of weeks.
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Old 05-16-2015, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,316 posts, read 3,535,315 times
Reputation: 4524
Same here, Matthew Duck. It takes me about two days.
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Old 05-16-2015, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,412,150 times
Reputation: 36095
Depends on the place. And on the assimilating person. I felt assimilated in Texas practically the minute I got here -- more assimilated than in Michigan, even after five years. Both cities about the same size.
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Old 05-17-2015, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta & Savannah, GA - Corpus Christi, TX
4,476 posts, read 7,310,299 times
Reputation: 2225
It took me a few years to feel completely comfortable with Atlanta, but I really didn't care how spread out it was.

Corpus Christi seems like a different world altogether. I do like how I can get to everything in 15 minutes or less. Complete opposite of Atlanta where it took at least 30 minutes to get anywhere. Apples and oranges though.

I don't care for small towns really, but I have been in Minneapolis since I moved to Texas. Ha!
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Old 07-26-2015, 09:36 PM
 
Location: the Great Lakes states
798 posts, read 2,180,726 times
Reputation: 538
It really depends on the people you "land" near.

Two of my moves, I felt like I belonged, and I felt connected, the first week. I liked the surroundings but more importantly there were people who reached out to me and made me feel welcome. Or, if I initiated the connection, whoever it was wholeheartedly welcomed me in.

One move, I had a job I absolutely loved, and I was only an hour from family. That was an easy move.

There were three moves, where honestly it never came together. No matter what I tried, or who I talked to, I never found welcoming people or places I loved, and never felt at home.

Because everything in America is at least a little bit standardized -- same chain stores, grocery stores, restaurants, cable companies, fitness centers... it's not terribly hard to situate yourself in a new environment. The difference is how warm and welcoming the people are and what the local organizations/institutions offer.

For instance about organizations and institutions, there is a major difference between moving to a city where the park district offers dozens of classes and leagues, and a city where that doesn't exist. Similarly with libraries, YMCA's, churches, school districts, universities and what they offer to the public, etc.
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Old 11-03-2015, 03:14 PM
 
1,378 posts, read 1,120,196 times
Reputation: 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by summer22 View Post
It really depends on the people you "land" near.

Two of my moves, I felt like I belonged, and I felt connected, the first week. I liked the surroundings but more importantly there were people who reached out to me and made me feel welcome. Or, if I initiated the connection, whoever it was wholeheartedly welcomed me in.

One move, I had a job I absolutely loved, and I was only an hour from family. That was an easy move.

There were three moves, where honestly it never came together. No matter what I tried, or who I talked to, I never found welcoming people or places I loved, and never felt at home.

Because everything in America is at least a little bit standardized -- same chain stores, grocery stores, restaurants, cable companies, fitness centers... it's not terribly hard to situate yourself in a new environment. The difference is how warm and welcoming the people are and what the local organizations/institutions offer.

For instance about organizations and institutions, there is a major difference between moving to a city where the park district offers dozens of classes and leagues, and a city where that doesn't exist. Similarly with libraries, YMCA's, churches, school districts, universities and what they offer to the public, etc.
Sums up my experience in CLT. Instantly disliked the place. After 7 months of it not getting better, I packed up a left the state. Back to the question, my experience has been within 6-12 months I usually know if a place is for me.
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Old 11-03-2015, 03:16 PM
 
11,194 posts, read 22,422,847 times
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Moving from Iowa to Chicago I felt totally comfortable and knew what was up within a few weeks or so.
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Old 11-03-2015, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Miami, Floroda
650 posts, read 607,176 times
Reputation: 371
2 weeks or so. Long enough so I know where things are and get use to the new place.
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Old 11-04-2015, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,243 posts, read 24,486,539 times
Reputation: 13025
Never felt all the way at home where I'm from (Southern CA). I fit culturally, but never felt I did all the way socially/mentally/or state of mind.

Always felt at home in metro Seattle.

Never felt at home in metro Denver, been here 8+ years.

Spokane felt like home after a couple of weeks. Ridgecrest, CA felt like home after about a year and a half.

The answer varies, for me.
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Old 11-04-2015, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,165,077 times
Reputation: 7080
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Never felt all the way at home where I'm from (Southern CA). I fit culturally, but never felt I did all the way socially/mentally/or state of mind.

Always felt at home in metro Seattle.

Never felt at home in metro Denver, been here 8+ years.

Spokane felt like home after a couple of weeks. Ridgecrest, CA felt like home after about a year and a half.

The answer varies, for me.
Then why are you staying in the Denver area if you've been there for 8+ years and it still doesn't feel like home?
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