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Old 05-22-2015, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,495 posts, read 1,697,543 times
Reputation: 2212

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What do you guys consider Urban I can show pictures of Lagos,Nigeria and the Amount of people living in a small area would rival New York boroughs outside of Manhattan and even the "suburbs" of Lagos would be denser than the core of most of these cities. So for all those people hating on LA just because a city is sprawled out doesn't mean it's urban. The way Japanese organize their cities their is no such thing as unincorporated areas so some cities are the Japanese Houston's etc. but the majority of people might live in an area less than the size of San Francisco even though they have 300+ square miles. Example look up Toyota city, Japan and look at a map almost all of the urban areas where the vast majority of the 400,000 people live is in the Western and Specifically Southwestern part of the city.. Same with LA because of the sprawl no one may notice the dense LA city in the middle and like some have said many of the denser parts of LA are it's suburbs.
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Old 05-22-2015, 11:58 PM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,294,216 times
Reputation: 1520
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Yeah LA is suburban compared to NYC. Not sure what this proves, considering every North American city is suburban compared to NYC.
Indeed, most cities could be dismissed-yet a city may have a truly urban area if it has a significant downtown. In the case of LA, it seems there are multiple areas that are truly urban, so LA can hardly be dismissed as just an overgrown suburb.
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Old 05-23-2015, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
1,235 posts, read 1,357,453 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post
Really ? More urban ? Show me anywhere more dense and more urban in LA (outside the suburban sprawl) that is more urban then MIA?

It doesn't matter how densely packed places outside of the core is the fact remains : it's apart of sprawl - traffic, congestion, strip malls.
Downtown LA's daytime workforce population is over 500,000 people.

http://www.downtownla.com/pdfs/econ_...ket_Report.pdf

Downtown Miami's is 200,000.

http://www.miamidda.com/pdf/2014-dow...population.pdf

Downtown LA has two side by side National Register Historic Districts, a subway line, three light rail lines, numerous world class cultural institutions and a much more traditional urban character.

Downtown Miami is essentially a denser, taller Irvine, California (Orange County).

Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post

Here I'll just present you with some facts : Los Angeles Downtown (main hub) population per sq mile = 4,770

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=UTF-8#q=downtown%20los%20angeles%20population%20densit y&es_th=1

Miami downtown (main hub) population per sq mile = 27,487 (2010)

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=UTF-8#q=downtown%20miami%20population%20density&es_th= 1

Make sense now ?
Your source for Downtown LA's supposedly low population density is including large swaths of industrial districts to the east of the Historic Core, South Park, the Financial District, etc.

Downtown Profile - Mapping L.A. - Los Angeles Times

Most of the residential base (and office base) of DTLA is clustered in the western portion. The actual population density of this smaller area would be more like 30,000 to 40,000 persons per sq mile.
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Old 05-23-2015, 04:46 AM
 
1,564 posts, read 1,122,697 times
Reputation: 500
StreetLegal hit it right on the nail, But of course the L.A bashing is sickening on here .

And Munchitup stop worrying about my opinions Weirdo #Troll
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Old 05-23-2015, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
1,235 posts, read 1,357,453 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post
Here I'll just present you with some facts : Los Angeles Downtown (main hub) population per sq mile = 4,770

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...ensity&es_th=1

Miami downtown (main hub) population per sq mile = 27,487 (2010)

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...ensity&es_th=1

Make sense now ?
Yes, makes sense. You are cooking the books.

Your source for Miami's "downtown" is the Miami Downtown Dev. Authority (MDDA) which includes residential districts north of the CBD/Brickell area including Overtown, Arts/Ent., Wynwood/Edgewater, etc.

Miami Downtown Development Authority

This would be like extending Downtown LA further west to Westlake/MacArthur Park, Koreatown, etc.

Last edited by StreetLegal; 05-23-2015 at 06:07 AM..
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Old 05-23-2015, 02:06 PM
 
Location: worldwide
696 posts, read 880,397 times
Reputation: 481
When people visit Los Angeles they go to visit the metro most of the time and not the urban core itself. LA = Giant Dense Suburb.
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Old 05-23-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,495 posts, read 1,697,543 times
Reputation: 2212
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post
When people visit Los Angeles they go to visit the metro most of the time and not the urban core itself. LA = Giant Dense Suburb.
Using that logic all of America's cities are a giant dense suburb???
London is a dense suburb because most people don't live in density 25,000 people per square km or over? Even 25,000 per square mile or over would work. New York is dense suburb if you exclude because only 400-2000 square miles of its 13,000+ square mile metro is urban. With that logic only cities not in the U.S are dense and all U.S cities are giant suburbs??? Another thing how are you going to generalize and say most people go to the suburbs rather than the urban core. What's in the non urban, burbs of LA that will attract ore visitors than LA and the urban suburbs of LA??
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Old 05-23-2015, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,672,514 times
Reputation: 6288
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityKing View Post
When people visit Los Angeles they go to visit the metro most of the time and not the urban core itself. LA = Giant Dense Suburb.
You're not even trying to make sense anymore.
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Old 05-23-2015, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,103,705 times
Reputation: 3979
Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetLegal View Post
Downtown LA's daytime workforce population is over 500,000 people.

http://www.downtownla.com/pdfs/econ_...ket_Report.pdf

Downtown Miami's is 200,000.

http://www.miamidda.com/pdf/2014-dow...population.pdf

Downtown LA has two side by side National Register Historic Districts, a subway line, three light rail lines, numerous world class cultural institutions and a much more traditional urban character.

Downtown Miami is essentially a denser, taller Irvine, California (Orange County).



Your source for Downtown LA's supposedly low population density is including large swaths of industrial districts to the east of the Historic Core, South Park, the Financial District, etc.

Downtown Profile - Mapping L.A. - Los Angeles Times

Most of the residential base (and office base) of DTLA is clustered in the western portion. The actual population density of this smaller area would be more like 30,000 to 40,000 persons per sq mile.
I don't think the bolded is really fair. There are some truly urban parts of downtown Miami.

But Brickell strikes me as "Condo Canyon by the sea." For those that don't know, Condo Canyon is next to Westwood and while very tall and dense, is considered a very suburban part of Los Angeles.
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Old 05-23-2015, 05:16 PM
 
Location: worldwide
696 posts, read 880,397 times
Reputation: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
You're not even trying to make sense anymore.
Makes plenty of sense. Los Angeles is so overpopulated that it appears to be urban to it's residents when it's really just dense suburban sprawl.
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