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View Poll Results: Which Midwestern states feels the most Western?
Minnesota 1 2.08%
North Dakota 2 4.17%
South Dakota 34 70.83%
Nebraska 8 16.67%
Kansas 3 6.25%
Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-18-2015, 09:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
I would say there are three - the western parts of South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. Minnesota doesn't seem western, at all.
I think socioculturally Minnesota is pretty similar to the Pacific Northwest though, especially comparing the natives of both regions. In some ways Minneapolis has more in common with Seattle and Portland than it does with cities like Cleveland and Philadelphia.
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Old 05-18-2015, 11:07 PM
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Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Minnesota is very midwestern. Lots of churchgoers, while Portland and Seattle are among the most unchurched cities in the country. Just one example.

As Philadelphia is not the midwest, and Cleveland is marginal, I don't know why they are part of the discussion.
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Old 05-19-2015, 05:51 AM
 
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Nebraska and South Dakota are both very western terrain-wise. Sandhills, badlands, toadstool, black hills, fort robinson area, wildcat hills, buttes, mesas etc. 3/4ths of both states are very western

Kansas and North Dakota are next with Minnesota and Iowa a distant next in line.
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Old 05-19-2015, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
^^Minnesota is very midwestern. Lots of churchgoers, while Portland and Seattle are among the most unchurched cities in the country. Just one example.

As Philadelphia is not the midwest, and Cleveland is marginal, I don't know why they are part of the discussion.
Agreed. Culturally, Minnesota is Midwestern through and through--not really anything like the Pac NW, and I never understand the comparison.

My vote is either for South Dakota, or western Nebraska. However, the bulk of Nebraska population is very Midwestern, in my experience.
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:05 AM
AT9
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
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I think the MN to OR/WA comparison is more apt when people are talking about Minneapolis/St. Paul to Seattle or Portland. Rural MN, especially Western or Southern MN, shares a lot more in common with the Dakotas, Iowa, or Wisconsin.
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Agreed. Culturally, Minnesota is Midwestern through and through--not really anything like the Pac NW, and I never understand the comparison.

My vote is either for South Dakota, or western Nebraska. However, the bulk of Nebraska population is very Midwestern, in my experience.
I wont argue the population. Even though we are far from being rust-belt as manufacturing isnt a a major part of our economy.

Outside of agriculture, Nebraska is very balanced and diversified. Omaha specifically has five fortune 500 companies and 10 fortune 1000. So we are similar to a smaller Minneapolis.

That said 2/3rds to 3/4ths of the state is very western 'terrain-wise'
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
I wont argue the population. Even though we are far from being rust-belt as manufacturing isnt a a major part of our economy.

Outside of agriculture, Nebraska is very balanced and diversified. Omaha specifically has five fortune 500 companies and 10 fortune 1000. So we are similar to a smaller Minneapolis.

That said 2/3rds to 3/4ths of the state is very western 'terrain-wise'
Sure, you don't have to be rust belt to be Midwestern, e.g. Columbus, Indianapolis, portions of central Illinois, Madison, large chunks of Iowa, etc.
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Sure, you don't have to be rust belt to be Midwestern, e.g. Columbus, Indianapolis, portions of central Illinois, Madison, large chunks of Iowa, etc.
I wholeheartedly agree with you. Omaha is very Minneapolisish, Lincoln is more Madisonish. I wouldnt want these cities to be any other way.

Last edited by Omahahonors; 05-19-2015 at 07:27 AM..
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Old 05-19-2015, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by AT9 View Post
I think the MN to OR/WA comparison is more apt when people are talking about Minneapolis/St. Paul to Seattle or Portland. Rural MN, especially Western or Southern MN, shares a lot more in common with the Dakotas, Iowa, or Wisconsin.
About 60% of the population of MN lives in the Minneapolis MSA. Minneapolis drives Minnesota.
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Old 05-19-2015, 08:38 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
I wont argue the population. Even though we are far from being rust-belt as manufacturing isnt a a major part of our economy.

Outside of agriculture, Nebraska is very balanced and diversified. Omaha specifically has five fortune 500 companies and 10 fortune 1000. So we are similar to a smaller Minneapolis.

That said 2/3rds to 3/4ths of the state is very western 'terrain-wise'
Isn't the divisor between the humid midwest/east and the arid west the 100th meridian, just a little more than halfway (west) across Nebraska? Of course, there's no actual dividing line like that, it's more gradual.
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