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Old 05-21-2015, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,279,915 times
Reputation: 11734

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
^Norfolk's figure surprises me a bit.
From top to bottom.

Boston - 155,919 (26.5%/57.5%)
New York - 1,326,996 (16.6%/48.2%)
Philadelphia - 292,275 (19.3%/46.9% of NHWs)
Wilmington - 10,001 (13.8%/45.6% of NHWs)
Baltimore - 53,536 (8.2%/27.5% of NHWs)
Washington - 34,779 (6.0%/23.7% of NHWs)
Richmond - 11,450 (5.8%/16.4% of NHWs)
Norfolk - 21,436 (9.1%/21.2% of NHWs)

Then there's the Deep, Deep South

Jackson - 7,477 (4.0%/15.5%)
Birmingham - 9,407 (3.9%/17.6%)

Last edited by BajanYankee; 05-21-2015 at 02:14 PM..
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Old 05-24-2015, 07:37 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,276,304 times
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I think Baltimore and Philly would lean more towards the North, along with Wilmington. DC and Richmond, more towards the South (Norfolk, too).

You can feel some southern influence in Maryland suburbs east of DC, and of course Northern Virginia has Confederate heritage.

Apparently Baltimore had many Confederate sympathizers, but the whole Baltimore area has never struck me as very southern for some reason. DC is barely more southern.

I guess Richmond and Norfolk could go either way between southern and Mid-Atlantic, but those are honestly the South to me.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:09 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,307 posts, read 19,585,657 times
Reputation: 13098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
The mid-atlantic is frequently described as an area of the east coast that blends cultural elements of the northeast and southeast. I am going to use the southern portion of the mid-atlantic region as defined by Wikipedia (Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia) since these are normally the most controversial areas. For each city, how much would you describe the current culture using a southern/northern gradient. For example, I view Washington, DC as 60% northern and 40% southern culturally.

Here is the city list:

Wilmington Delaware
Baltimore
Annapolis
Morgantown WV
Charleston WV
Washington DC
Charlottesville
Richmond
Virginia Beach/Norfolk
I consider the stretch from Washington DC to New York City as a single region with pretty much the same lifestyle and mentality.

I've done a lot of traveling and business in this area lately and there is not much significant difference (except that New York City is obviously bigger than anywhere else).
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,214 posts, read 2,842,150 times
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Forget the technical, "official" definition of Mid-Atlantic. In reality/general parlance, Mid-Atlantic is centered on the Baltimore-Washington metropolis; it extends south to include Greater Richmond and Hampton Roads; it includes all of Delaware south of Wilmington; and potentially westward to include the areas of Charrlottesville and Culpeper in Virginia, and Hagerstown in Maryland....

It's northern border ends at Maryland-Pennsylvania. Listen, I have family in Harrisburg and Williamsport, PA, and I'm familiar with those areas. Pennsylvania is its own identity, and the term Mid-Atlantic is not identifiable by locals. I used to live in Upstate New York--same thing, they don't identify as Mid-Atlantic. And I guess you can make an argument for South Jersey, but in my experience, people from Jersey don't identify as Mid-Atlantic, they're Jersey...

The term in itself isn't all inclusive, because all of VA isn't considered Mid-Atlantic. Almost all of Maryland is, but not the extreme western panhandle. And North Carolina isn't included in a general, realistic sense. The technical definition is not accurate as to what is realistically thought of as Mid-Atlantic. The Mid-Atlantic is basically considered, in layman's terms, the gray area between north and south on the East Coast....
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:03 PM
 
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North Carolina wouldn't be included in the Mid-Atlantic, I feel like NC is comfortably in the South. You don't really see any mention of "Mid-Atlantic" in NC like you might in Maryland or the DC area. People in Raleigh admit that they're living in the South, although I've heard a few in this area use the term "Down south" or even "The South" when referring to South Carolina and the Deep South. The Outer Banks could possibly be included in the Mid-Atlantic, at least if people call the Hampton Roads "Mid-Atlantic" over "southern" since the two regions aren't terribly far apart.

Regarding Virginia, I think the areas south of Richmond are unquestionably southern. North of Richmond, I could see why people would call those areas Mid-Atlantic. Most of the Virginia Piedmont strikes me as southern, areas along the lines of Lynchburg and Farmville. Charlottesville and Richmond kinda sit on the fence between the South and Mid-Atlantic, at least in my opinion. Richmond leans more towards the South as far as I'm concerned, mostly due to the Confederate and tobacco legacy. After all, when you drive through on I-95 heading south, don't you see "Southern States" written on the side of a factory along the James River? Must be a sign, right? Joking a tad, but still.
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:30 PM
Status: "Phillies baseball is MLB dysentery." (set 4 days ago)
 
1,241 posts, read 585,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
North Carolina wouldn't be included in the Mid-Atlantic, I feel like NC is comfortably in the South. You don't really see any mention of "Mid-Atlantic" in NC like you might in Maryland or the DC area. People in Raleigh admit that they're living in the South, although I've heard a few in this area use the term "Down south" or even "The South" when referring to South Carolina and the Deep South. The Outer Banks could possibly be included in the Mid-Atlantic, at least if people call the Hampton Roads "Mid-Atlantic" over "southern" since the two regions aren't terribly far apart.

Regarding Virginia, I think the areas south of Richmond are unquestionably southern. North of Richmond, I could see why people would call those areas Mid-Atlantic. Most of the Virginia Piedmont strikes me as southern, areas along the lines of Lynchburg and Farmville. Charlottesville and Richmond kinda sit on the fence between the South and Mid-Atlantic, at least in my opinion. Richmond leans more towards the South as far as I'm concerned, mostly due to the Confederate and tobacco legacy. After all, when you drive through on I-95 heading south, don't you see "Southern States" written on the side of a factory along the James River? Must be a sign, right? Joking a tad, but still.
What about the numerous Richmond businesses with "Mid-Atlantic" in its name?
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Old 05-25-2015, 07:59 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,024 posts, read 102,689,903 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
That's how I view it for DC. It's a city with a Northeastern vibe and Southeastern undertone mixed into one. This mixture is pretty evident in DC's architecture, physical layout, culture, history, accent/dialect, racial/ethnic demographics, housing stock, mentality, work ethic, suburbs, public transportation, cuisine, governance, pace of life, climate, general vibe, and even the vegetation. Always makes for a very interesting city, and Baltimore and even both Richmond and Hampton Roads are the same way as well (Virginia is a Southern state yes but like I always say, culture knows no boundaries).

Personally, I love this geo-cultural mix for the DC area
John Kennedy said DC was a city of "Northern charm and Southern efficiency".

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I wonder how many cities never had any ethnic white neighborhoods at any point in their history.
Good question. Denver and San Francisco, neither known for "white ethnics" both have had large Italian populations going way back. Omaha, another "white bread" city, has its Czech and Italian populations. Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit have large ethnic populations as well, esp. Poles and Italians.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I think Baltimore and Philly would lean more towards the North, along with Wilmington. DC and Richmond, more towards the South (Norfolk, too).

You can feel some southern influence in Maryland suburbs east of DC, and of course Northern Virginia has Confederate heritage.

Apparently Baltimore had many Confederate sympathizers, but the whole Baltimore area has never struck me as very southern for some reason. DC is barely more southern.

I guess Richmond and Norfolk could go either way between southern and Mid-Atlantic, but those are honestly the South to me.
I lived in Wilmington DE for a while. It did not seem southern. I, or more accurately my parents, lived in Frederick, MD for several years in the late 60s/early 70s. It seemed more southern than PA, where we came from.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 05-25-2015 at 08:11 AM..
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Old 05-25-2015, 08:49 AM
 
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Wilmington, DE isn't southern at all, it's not that different from Philly. Baltimore is in the same boat, but to a lesser extent.
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,279,915 times
Reputation: 11734
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Forget the technical, "official" definition of Mid-Atlantic. In reality/general parlance, Mid-Atlantic is centered on the Baltimore-Washington metropolis; it extends south to include Greater Richmond and Hampton Roads; it includes all of Delaware south of Wilmington; and potentially westward to include the areas of Charrlottesville and Culpeper in Virginia, and Hagerstown in Maryland....

It's northern border ends at Maryland-Pennsylvania. Listen, I have family in Harrisburg and Williamsport, PA, and I'm familiar with those areas. Pennsylvania is its own identity, and the term Mid-Atlantic is not identifiable by locals. I used to live in Upstate New York--same thing, they don't identify as Mid-Atlantic. And I guess you can make an argument for South Jersey, but in my experience, people from Jersey don't identify as Mid-Atlantic, they're Jersey...

The term in itself isn't all inclusive, because all of VA isn't considered Mid-Atlantic. Almost all of Maryland is, but not the extreme western panhandle. And North Carolina isn't included in a general, realistic sense. The technical definition is not accurate as to what is realistically thought of as Mid-Atlantic. The Mid-Atlantic is basically considered, in layman's terms, the gray area between north and south on the East Coast....
Good post.
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Old 06-12-2015, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Charlottesville, Virginia
17 posts, read 14,284 times
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The real issue is that so many people from other areas have moved into the Mid-Atlantic that it's much harder to define. For example there is NOTHING Southern about NOVA. I lived there 20+ years. Basically the DC Metro Region pulls people in from everywhere for the jobs - heavy on government and contracting. I currently live in Charlottesville, VA which is in central VA area and I don't find it Southern at all. There is some of the laid-back Southern vibe, more easy-going that is pleasant and permeates it, and outside of Albemarle County you begin to find more local central Virginia that tends to be more Southern. Because of UVA and other attractions there are people from everywhere here, making it hard to categorize as North or South. Same is true of Harrisonburg, home of JMU, and some other central areas. The Mid-Atlantic is its own category in some ways, and also is different by geographic area. Maryland's Eastern Shore has its own character. Southeastern Virginia is poor and rural and Southern. Any larger metro area, or larger city like Charlottesville and Harrisonburg will draw people from elsewhere who expand out into the surrounding area and change the characteristic.

The early 20th Century heavy ethnic group identification that identifies much of the NorthEast and Industrial North Midwest is absent in the Mid-Atlantic.
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