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Old 05-21-2015, 04:22 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't think it's farfetched at all. I grew up on the East Coast (African American) and those shows influenced me and others around me. I think California English is considered "normal" because that's what we heard in movies. Most people are trying to copy that accent moreso than a thick New York or Boston accent.
Hollywood doesn't necessarily equal Californian accents though. Many, many famous actors are not from California at all, and they don't sound like they are. It's not like actors all suddenly uptalk like they're a valley girl or something.
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Old 05-21-2015, 04:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
Hollywood doesn't necessarily equal Californian accents though. Many, many famous actors are not from California at all, and they don't sound like they are. It's not like actors all suddenly uptalk like they're a valley girl or something.
If anything I'd actually say California's social and linguistic influence is a bit lower now, than it was in the 80s/90s, though economically (a bad thing) and demographically (not a bad or good thing IMO) the US seems more and more Californian every day.
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Old 05-21-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
If anything I'd actually say California's social and linguistic influence is a bit lower now, than it was in the 80s/90s, though economically (a bad thing) and demographically (not a bad or good thing IMO) the US seems more and more Californian every day.
I frankly don't see it from the places I've lived and visited in the US culturally speaking, so we'll have to agree to disagree. Also, if by demographically you mean more Hispanic people, I guess so? They don't necessarily equal California either though.

Culture aside, much of California is going to have issues with their lack of water going into the future. Not saying we're going to see a reverse migration back east, but something has got to give out there moving forward.
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Old 05-21-2015, 04:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
I frankly don't see it from the places I've lived and visited in the US culturally speaking, so we'll have to agree to disagree. Also, if by demographically you mean more Hispanic people, I guess so? They don't necessarily equal California either though.

Culture aside, much of California is going to have issues with their lack of water going into the future. Not saying we're going to see a reverse migration back east, but something has got to give out there moving forward.
I mean a few things.

1) More multi-racial in general
2) More Hispanic, yes (I don't have a problem with this. Even the illegal immigrants are just chasing opportunity and to me that makes them good Americans!)
3) Larger gap between the rich and poor (this is a bad thing IMO)
4) The embrace of the "California ideology" - ie, socially liberal but fiscally right wing, the latter being largely the cause of #3
5) Warmer and drier climates due to global warming everywhere
6) People are becoming more self-centered, unfriendly and "fake happy" which is due to Californian and capitalist influence
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Old 05-21-2015, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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This is probably one of the most absurd threads I've seen. Also, why create a new thread with the exact same title.
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Old 05-21-2015, 05:54 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
I mean a few things.

1) More multi-racial in general
2) More Hispanic, yes (I don't have a problem with this. Even the illegal immigrants are just chasing opportunity and to me that makes them good Americans!)
3) Larger gap between the rich and poor (this is a bad thing IMO)
4) The embrace of the "California ideology" - ie, socially liberal but fiscally right wing, the latter being largely the cause of #3
5) Warmer and drier climates due to global warming everywhere
6) People are becoming more self-centered, unfriendly and "fake happy" which is due to Californian and capitalist influence
I don't associate 5 out of 6 of your points with California, especially the ones regarding capitalism since American capitalism is always going to be associated with Wall Street. As for the growing gap between the rich and poor, a lot of that has to do with policies in Washington, not California.

The one point I do associate with it is its climate, but, by the time the rest of the country becomes so dry and hot that people think California, the actual state of California will be screwed. Until then though, regions like the Northeast and Midwest just had record breaking winters in terms of cold temperatures and snowfall in many cities. Some parts of the South experienced this as well.
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
Hollywood doesn't necessarily equal Californian accents though. Many, many famous actors are not from California at all, and they don't sound like they are. It's not like actors all suddenly uptalk like they're a valley girl or something.
Stacey Dash did. She definitely didn't sound like a girl who spent much of her formative life in the Bronx and then later North Jersey.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPzZIJ-4Cq4

I think most people entering a career in journalism or acting feel pressure to "normalize" their accents (if they ever had one). Whether that means adopting "California English" or not is difficult to say as it doesn't sound all that distinct from General American English.

But overall, I was thinking more about the popular teen shows/movies from the 80s and 90s. I should not have said "California English" but instead should have said that a lot of people from my generation have been influenced by shows set in California. Granted, that's not the same thing as "California English" even though many of the actors/actresses in those shows/movies grew up in California. I think "California English" has become sort of the standard for the upper middle class Millennial generation. We're talking about a generation of people in their mid 30s to mid 20s who grew up on a whole slew of shows filmed in California and/or featuring California natives.

Even Boy Meets World, which was supposed to be set in my hometown, starred two actors who grew up in California (Danielle Fishel who played Topanga is from Arizona).
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Old 05-22-2015, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
Yeah I think California English and Black American English have both hugely influenced Millennial speech, much in the same way Estuary English and Jafaican have influenced the dialects of young British people from all over the UK.
It's sort of fun to take a jaunt down memory lane and look at the biggest teen stars from the 80s and 90s and where they hail from. These are the actors I'd say had the greatest influence on teen culture during this time.

Molly Ringwald (Roseville, CA)
Alicia Silverstone (Los Angeles, CA)
Brittney Murphy (Edison, NJ/Los Angeles, CA)
Claire Danes (New York, NY)
Jennifer Love-Hewitt (Nolanville, TX/Los Angeles, CA)
Larisa Oleynik (Santa Clara, CA)
Drew Barrymore (Culver City, CA)
Joey Lawrence (Philadelphia, PA)
Leonardo DiCaprio (Los Angeles, CA)
Lee Thompson Young (Columbia, SC)
Macaulay Culkin (New York, NY)
Jaleel White (Los Angeles, CA)
Malcolm-Jamal Warner (New York, NY)
Britney Spears (Kentwood, LA)
Justin Timberlake (Memphis, TN)
Mayim Bialik (San Diego, CA)
Jenna von Oy (Danbury, CT)
Winona Ryder (Elk, CA)
Johnny Depp (Miramar, FL)
Robert Downey (New York/London/Los Angeles)
Christina Applegate (Los Angeles, CA)
Matthew Broderick (New York, NY)
Melissa Joan Hart (Smithtown, NY)
Brooke Shields (Haworth, NJ)
Mark-Paul Gosselaar (Panorama City, CA)
Mario Lopez (San Diego, CA)
Tiffany-Amber Thiessen (Long Beach, CA)
Lark Voorhies (Pasadena, CA)
Paul Walker (Glendale, CA)
Freddie Prinze, Jr. (Los Angeles, CA)
Ethan Embry (Huntington Beach, CA)
Thora Birch (Los Angeles, CA)
James Van Der Beek (Cheshire, CT)
Katie Holmes (Toledo, OH)
Luke Perry (Mansfield, OH)
Brian Austin Green (Los Angeles, CA)
Joshua Jackson (Los Angeles, CA/Vancouver, BC)
Sean Astin (Santa Monica, CA)
Kirtsen Dunst (Point Pleasant, NJ/Los Angeles, CA)
Fred Savage (Los Angeles, CA)
Danica McKellar (Los Angeles, CA)
Ben Savage (Los Angeles, CA)
Rider Strong (San Francisco, CA)
Will Smith (Philadelphia, PA)
Tatyana Ali (Long Island, NY/Los Angeles, CA)
Ashton Kutcher (Cedar Rapids, IA)
Emilio Estevez (Santa Monica, CA)
Charlie Sheen (Santa Monica, CA)
Rob Lowe (Dayton, OH/Malibu, CA)
River Phoenix (Winter Park, FL)
Patrick Dempsey (Lewiston, ME)
Jodie Swedin (Los Angeles, CA)
Candace Cameron (Los Angeles, CA)
Shannen Doherty (Memphis, TN)
Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Los Angeles, CA)
Jonathan Taylor Thomas (Los Angeles, CA)

I'm sure a missed more than a few. A good number of these actors (the Savage Brothers and Tatyana Ali, for example) moved to California to pursue acting careers as young children. But many are California natives. This list covers a lot of teen pop culture from the late 80s/early 90s.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 05-22-2015 at 09:51 AM..
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Old 05-22-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,483 posts, read 2,222,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Stacey Dash did. She definitely didn't sound like a girl who spent much of her formative life in the Bronx and then later North Jersey.
In her case it makes sense though because the part called for it. I meant more so in terms of a general film.

Quote:
I think most people entering a career in journalism or acting feel pressure to "normalize" their accents (if they ever had one). Whether that means adopting "California English" or not is difficult to say as it doesn't sound all that distinct from General American English.
With broadcast journalism there has always been a strive to sound General American, but the General American accent isn't from California. It's from the Midwest, and it runs through parts of Nebraska, Iowa, and Central Illinois.

As for actors, I'm sure some of the big current ones have decided to reduce their accents, but whether or not it has been to Californian English or not is unknown. It isn't *that* different from General American like you said, but it is different nonetheless.

Quote:
But overall, I was thinking more about the popular teen shows/movies from the 80s and 90s. I should not have said "California English" but instead should have said that a lot of people from my generation have been influenced by shows set in California. Granted, that's not the same thing as "California English" even though many of the actors/actresses in those shows/movies grew up in California. I think "California English" has become sort of the standard for the upper middle class Millennial generation. We're talking about a generation of people in their mid 30s to mid 20s who grew up on a whole slew of shows filmed in California and/or featuring California natives.

Even Boy Meets World, which was supposed to be set in my hometown, starred two actors who grew up in California (Danielle Fishel who played Topanga is from Arizona).
This I can see, but where teen movies and shows take place has always been fairly dynamic. The 90s had Clueless, but the big teen movie of the early 00s, Mean Girls, was supposed to be taking place in Chicago's suburban North Shore.

The popular shows have also been bouncing around from the coasts. While some might have only been popular for a few seasons, shows like Gossip Girl and Pretty Little Liars are supposed to be East Coast, The Vampire Diaries and One Tree Hill are supposed to be the South (well, upper coastal South, but no one really sounds Southern...), Glee was the Midwest, and the new 90210 and the OC were California, etc. They all feature casts from all over, but their accents don't necessarily give it away.

As for California English becoming the standard for upper middle class Millennials, I'm a Millennial, and probably just a bit younger than you, but I wouldn't agree with this, nor did I experience it in college, and I watched plenty of shows set in California and other places, and so did my friends. Granted our accents were all fairly neutral in comparison to a Southern drawl, but plenty of quirky St. Louis pronunciations have fallen into the way I speak, my friends from the Chicago suburbs still have a nasally "a" sound, especially when pronouncing words like "car," and my friends from the upper Midwest from places like Minnesota still trip up and say the word "bag" completely different. I also can't say my friends that live in NYC sound different than you would expect considering the parts of the Northeast and other boroughs of the city they were originally from. Your accent was always going to be shaped far more by your parents and those who you grew up with, not the TV shows you watched while in high school or college.

The shows might have added some news phrases or other colloquialisms to your vocabulary, but accents across America didn't shift due to the original 90210 or Saved by the Bell, just like people I knew in high school weren't trying to sound different because Gossip Girl was supposed to be set on NYC's Upper East Side.
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Old 05-22-2015, 01:55 PM
 
781 posts, read 594,019 times
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God I hope not. I fear my beloved Denver has been taking just that turn for the worst in the last year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
Hell I'd even argue that California-style income inequality is spreading to other states, particularly other Western states like Oregon and Arizona.
California is definitely doing its best to destroy and/or drive out its middle class.
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