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Old 05-25-2015, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,370 posts, read 12,985,769 times
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I lived in Seattle and now Los Angeles and find the cities to be completely different. This is why I find Los Angeles so unique and interesting. History, people, culture, food, topography, architecture, getaways; they are completely different. Is Port Townsend the same as Palm Springs? As an east coast transplant I have no problem seeing and discovering new and interesting places, different food and cultures. PanapolicRiddle, your statement is so untrue to me. Not just Seattle and LA but the entire west coast.

Last edited by pwright1; 05-25-2015 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 05-25-2015, 02:20 PM
 
Location: SF,CA
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We had this same discussion a few years ago. I tend to agree with you.

Homogeneity
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Old 05-25-2015, 03:22 PM
 
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I live in Seattle and I would travel to CA primarily to see the elusive sun! We have more of an indoor culture and they have more outdoor. I love all of the outdoor dining opportunities down there. Here you might appreciate the pubs and coffee shops on a cold misty day.

I think the people used to be very different, but now people are constantly on the move and bring their own cultural behaviors with them. Pretty soon you can't tell who was originally from the area and who migrated there. That's when things seem the same. The West coast tends to attract a certain type of person, as well.

Personally, I'm third generation Seattleite and Seattle doesn't even seem like Seattle anymore. I just went on a hike with my family and approximately 2000 other people. I couldn't believe it! Greenlake would have been much less crowded. I don't understand the point of going off into the woods just to have a thousand other people follow you out there!
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Old 05-25-2015, 06:53 PM
 
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The West is very homogenous, but it's very different from the rest of the country too. The Midwest, South and Northeast are also very distinct from each other, and of course Hawaii is like a country unto itself. I would say no.

Sure the Internet and Walmart make places seem more alike on a superficial level but I find that differences in personality are still quite strong and depend on geography. Though, you can find people like hipsters and wiggers pretty much anywhere these days. I don't think it was too different in say the 80s though. There is a book that documents American malls in the summer of 1989 and he was already talking about how they all looked exactly the same.
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Old 05-26-2015, 10:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
...
If I were seeking out unique places to visit, I would try to find those that weren't being talked about on the Internet or Face Book or the like. I think it's a waste of money to travel very far to places to where all the other lemmings are flocking thinking they are going to have a unique experience. Other than just going for a change of scenery like a forested area to a desert, a city to the country, etc you can probably find what you are looking for in your own area.
Exactly. For instance, when I was in Monterrey I only spent a couple hours in the Cannery Row area because it was touristy and gaudy. Many of the stores and attractions were very similar to the Seattle waterfront. The Monterrey Bay aquarium had nice exhibits, but it was too geared for tourists and kids for my taste.

I spent most of my time there in downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods. Downtown has a really nice microbrewery , and some nice cafes - pretty much like most Seattle neighborhoods do. And yes, that is my point: For me, the only incentive I have to travel is to experience quieter, undeveloped natural areas. There's both a variety (forests, mountains, deserts, oceans/coasts) and abundance of these in the PNW (WA, OR, ID), so there isn't really much incentive for me to travel very far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
I agree (the only exception being the eastern seaboard).

Most people throughout the nation live a life of suburban subdivisions, office parks and generic but nice strip malls/outlet malls with the same chain stores.

The COASTAL east coast remains the only region with strong variations. There, you can expect a completely different lifestyle in NYC vs Charleston vs DC vs Atlantic City vs Boston vs Orlando vs Baltimore vs Hamptons vs Lancaster PA, etc, etc.
True, but it's not even just the strip malls and chain stores. There are lots of independent businesses in Seattle (cafes, restaurants, microbreweries, etc.), but those aren't unique to Seattle; they're in just about every decent area. [Excluding really gross areas that really are nothing but strip malls.]

There is more variation on the east coast and SE, but eventually those areas will likely succumb to homogenization.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
At the end of the day, all these areas in the US visually look the same for the most part...which the OP pointed out. I think there is some cultural difference in different parts of the US, but it's not a very big one.
Exactly. This isn't intended to deride 'younger' people, but since they've grown up with homogenization it's probably normal to them. Those of us who are a bit older (I'm 44) can remember when there was more local uniqueness. Most people under 30 grew up in a different (more homogenized) world, so it's something they probably don't consider much.
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Old 05-26-2015, 10:33 AM
 
1,721 posts, read 1,007,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustinginSeattle View Post
Personally, I'm third generation Seattleite and Seattle doesn't even seem like Seattle anymore. I just went on a hike with my family and approximately 2000 other people. I couldn't believe it! Greenlake would have been much less crowded. I don't understand the point of going off into the woods just to have a thousand other people follow you out there!
Yeah, I feel exactly the same way. I actually miss having weekdays off for exactly that reason: If you want to avoid crowds during outdoor activities, it seems you only have two options: 1) Go during the week; 2) Travel far away from populated areas. On weekends it seems the only areas that aren't at least somewhat crowded are at least at least 120 miles from Seattle.
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Old 05-26-2015, 04:23 PM
 
1,721 posts, read 1,007,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
The West is very homogenous, but it's very different from the rest of the country too. The Midwest, South and Northeast are also very distinct from each other, and of course Hawaii is like a country unto itself. I would say no.
Re. HI, it depends on which Island: The less populated islands (Big Island, Kauai, Molokai) are still fairly unique (though the Big Island does have it's fair share of national chains). But Honolulu isn't much different from any other large city.
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Old 05-27-2015, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Asheville, NC
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I can relate with the OP. I don't know much about the west coast except for San Diego, CA but I do know about the east coast. Here's a perfect example: My sister is looking to move from the NE because the weather for many months in the winter is awful. She is also looking for someplace that is more diverse and that has more transplants than just locals. Anyhow, when helping her look for a place to move, I said to myself, you can find mostly all the same things in any area. I am speaking of shopping, restaurants, bars, enteratinment, etc. Meaning suburbs are suburbs and the mountains are mountains and the coast is the coast. Of course, there are some variations but they do have similarities. Most people engage in the same activities as the OP mentioned as well. That leaves weather and topography to be a decision maker. Of course work is of importance, but in my sister's case, she works remotely. I know this doesn't relate to travel but my point is that it is a similar scenario. Many people do "staycations" where they don't travel far from home but still go on vacation.
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Old 09-01-2015, 04:45 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,722,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
At the end of the day, all these areas in the US visually look the same for the most part...which the OP pointed out. I think there is some cultural difference in different parts of the US, but it's not a very big one.
I think the "superficial" culture of the US has been greatly homogenized (more by TV than by the Net and Web), but the "deep culture" is still pervasive. Here in the Pacific Northwest social culture is very different from other parts of the country, it's the same with the South, New England, Minnesota, etc as well.

We might all eat at McDonald's but different regions still have their own unwritten social rules and slightly different perspectives of the world.
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