U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:35 AM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
And yet it's interesting that the city wasn't mentioned ONCE in the 72 pages of this very recent thread.

What are the best cities in America for Black people all around, for everything?

Having a high Black percentage doesn't mean that your metro will have a high profile within Black America. As this thread demonstrates, a metro that's 33% Black can easily go under the radar and not garner as much as a whisper in a thread specifically devoted to discussing the "best cities in America for Black people."
So what? This doesn't mean that the area isn't on the radar of some Black people because it isn't on a thread. It is a smaller, but growing metro and knowing how C-D is, Columbia not being mentioned is not a surprise.

Also, what is the criteria for the list you made? It seems like a random range of metros.

I guess based off of that list, Black people should be sprinting to Tucson, Albuquerque and Olympia.......I think many Black people would go to Milwaukee versus those locations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:41 AM
 
29,928 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
So what? This doesn't mean that the area isn't on the radar of some Black people because it isn't on a thread. It is a smaller, but growing metro and knowing how C-D is, Columbia not being mentioned is not a surprise.

Also, what is the criteria for the list you made? It seems like a random range of metros.

I guess based off of that list, Black people should be sprinting to Tucson, Albuquerque and Olympia.......I think many Black people would go to Milwaukee versus those locations.
I'd go to Columbia over all of them lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,210 posts, read 1,301,825 times
Reputation: 2050
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
What's your point, doof? You've wasted a lot of precious screen space flopping around needlessly, when you even admitted you agreed with my initial (very simple) point - Milwaukee's blacks should be grouped with Chicago's blacks, not Minneapolis'. Considering nearly every black person in Wisconsin lives just north of Chicago, moves freely throughout the area, and has a similar heritage, this is pretty easy to understand.

The one flaw in grouping by states is that it doesn't make ANY sense in Wisconsin's case. Continue vomiting all the data you want, but it doesn't make a lick of difference - OP did a nice job, but one flaw is grouping blacks in Milwaukee with blacks in Minneapolis, when they are basically a sattelite revolving around Chicago. This is a fact. I live here. You have likely never been here. Another dude who has heavy knowledge of the region also agrees. Give it up, you're just wasting space!

D*mn bro. Aright Lol. A lil brother/sisterhood please
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,210 posts, read 1,301,825 times
Reputation: 2050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'd go to Columbia over all of them lol.
Only western metros I can go for as a black guy would be Denver Las Vegas Seattle (but live in Tacoma) Oakland or LA (maybe San Bernadino county)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:48 AM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
How did we go from "not large" to "not small"? I said that the Black communities we "hear about" are the large ones and/or the ones with upwardly mobile Black populations. Milwaukee's Black population doesn't fit either bill since it is not large in the manner of Detroit nor is it upwardly mobile and well-educated in the manner of Raleigh-Durham.



We are talking about different things. I'm talking about Black communities that people "hear about," which would presumably include places like Atlanta, DC, Dallas, Chicago, NYC, etc. Areas of the U.S. with high Black percentages are not completely anomalous in the U.S., particularly in the South. Yet there are Black communities in the South that we often "hear about" like Raleigh, Houston, Charlotte and Atlanta and places we don't hear much about like Jackson. You are sort of conflating "high Black percentage" with notoriety and the two are not the same.

On the flipside, you have cities and metros with relatively low Black percentages like Los Angeles. People "hear about" the Black population there because it is large relative to most other places even if the overall percentage is low.
A city that is 40% Black and a metro percentage on par with Chicago and NYC doesn't have a large Black presence? I never said Milwaukee's Black presence was small and you can't get much Blacker than Detroit in terms of a city, regardless of region.

I think you are framing this in a mainstream way, but people that try to recognize demographics, population trends and history would know about other cities. So, in that sense, I agree that we are viewing this in different ways.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 05-28-2015 at 09:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
So what? This doesn't mean that the area isn't on the radar of Black people because it isn't on a thread. It is a smaller, but growing metro and knowing how C-D is, Columbia not being mentioned is not a surprise.
Well, it clearly isn't on the radar because nobody bothered to mention it. There are clearly dozens of metros that people will think of before thinking of that one. It's sort of the same way NBA fans will think of David Lee, Bradley Beal or Jrue Holiday before thinking of JaKarr Sampson. The fact that no one even mentioned only reinforces my point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Also, what is the criteria for the list you made? It seems like a random range of metros.
It is a bit random after going through most of the large metros. Should I list every metropolitan statistical area in the US?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I guess based off of that list, Black people should be sprinting to Tucson, Albuquerque and Olympia.......I think many Black people would go to Milwaukee versus those locations.
Yeah, only if you refuse to listen to what I'm saying. There are clearly levels to this. The Black communities people "hear about" are the ones with large Black populations and/or upwardly mobile Black populations. Atlanta, DC and NYC meet both criteria. Chicago and Philly have huge Black populations, which gives them a high profile in the Black community, but they are not considered to be as attractive as the aforementioned due to lower levels of educational attainment. They are a tier down. You could probably the same about Los Angeles. Raleigh doesn't have a big Black population like Memphis, but it is very well-educated, so it's in the public consciousness.

Milwaukee doesn't have a big Black population like Memphis and the educational attainment rate among Blacks rivals Toledo's. Why would that be on the radar of any Black person other than a stats nerd who pays attention to Black communities in places like Ithaca?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
A city that is 40% Black and a metro percentage on par with Chicago and NYC doesn't have a large Black presence? I never said Milwaukee's Black presence was small and you can't get much Blacker than Detroit in terms of a city, regardless of region.
I didn't say anything about a "large Black presence." Jackson has a "large Black presence." Columbia has a "large Black presence." But those cities don't have particularly large Black populations in an absolute sense. In other words, they don't have the type of numbers to attract attention the way cities like St. Louis or Memphis do (largely owing to the fact they aren't major cities).

Los Angeles, on the other hand, has a low Black percentage, but has around 1 million Black people living in the region. Milwaukee, Tuscaloosa, and Augusta may all have higher Black percentages, but which Black community do people "hear about." The answer is clearly Los Angeles since it is one of the largest Black communities in the country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think you are framing this in a mainstream way, but people that try to recognize demographics, population trends and history would know about other cities. So, in that sense, I agree that we are viewing this in different ways.
We are viewing this in different ways. You are basically saying that a city with a high Black percentage is "on the radar." I don't agree with that. I think the only Black communities we "hear about" are the ones with large Black populations. This would include NYC, LA, Chicago, Detroit, DC, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Miami, etc. The exceptions are metros with smaller but highly-educated Black populations like Raleigh. Coincidentally, these are the metros that hog nearly all the discussion in any thread that touches on this topic.

Milwaukee is about as far off the radar as you can get. I suppose it's not Spokane but it's less notable than Jackson, which is pretty far down in my book. You will rarely see those two metros mentioned along the likes of Dallas or Raleigh as far as Black folks are concerned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 09:17 AM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Well, it clearly isn't on the radar because nobody bothered to mention it. There are clearly dozens of metros that people will think of before thinking of that one. It's sort of the same way NBA fans will think of David Lee, Bradley Beal or Jrue Holiday before thinking of JaKarr Sampson. The fact that no one even mentioned only reinforces my point.



It is a bit random after going through most of the large metros. Should I list every metropolitan statistical area in the US?



Yeah, only if you refuse to listen to what I'm saying. There are clearly levels to this. The Black communities people "hear about" are the ones with large Black populations and/or upwardly mobile Black populations. Atlanta, DC and NYC meet both criteria. Chicago and Philly have huge Black populations, which gives them a high profile in the Black community, but they are not considered to be as attractive as the aforementioned due to lower levels of educational attainment. They are a tier down. You could probably the same about Los Angeles. Raleigh doesn't have a big Black population like Memphis, but it is very well-educated, so it's in the public consciousness.

Milwaukee doesn't have a big Black population like Memphis and the educational attainment rate among Blacks rivals Toledo's. Why would that be on the radar of any Black person other than a stats nerd who pays attention to Black communities in places like Ithaca?
No, just no and keep in mind that we are talking about C-D here.

I would think a list of say the top 50, 75 or 100 metros would be a simpler way to look at the topic.

Again, Milwaukee is essentially Chicago in terms of city and metro Black percentages. So, you may be underestimating if people know about its Black community.

Again, Memphis is probably the Blackest top 100 metro in the country and by your "criteria", if Milwaukee doesn't have a large Black population, then Chicago doesn't. That wouldn't make any sense though.

As for the Ithaca comment, I actually not too far away and have an interest in all Black communities, regardless of size. If you stepped outside of the handful of metros that are spoon fed to you, you may actually recognize some other Black communities and people doing good things in many locations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'd go to Columbia over all of them lol.
I would too...if you put Milwaukee, Columbia, Jackson and Spokane in front of me and told me I couldn't live anywhere else. But to say that it has even a modestly high profile in Black America is a stretch. It's about on par with Augusta, which doesn't have a high profile in Black America. If we are talking about the cities that people "hear about," which is what cheese plate said, then we are clearly talking about Atlanta, DC and NYC. Those cities are followed by Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Los Angeles and Philadelphia. Baltimore, Detroit and St. Louis would likely be a step down. Then you have smaller metros--mostly in the South--like Raleigh and Nashville with vibrant Black middle classes. Then you might get around to cities like Boston or the SF Bay Area that aren't known as swell places for Blacks but have large Black populations relative to everywhere else.

Birmingham, Jackson or Columbia would fall somewhere after all of these cities (except for maybe retirees). Milwaukee would rank behind these cities since it has a smaller Black population than all of them and fewer professional Blacks than all of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,397,432 times
Reputation: 2895
And, for the millionth time - you don't "hear about" Milwaukee blacks because it's considered part-and-parcel with Chicago. Oprah grew up in Milwaukee, and settled in Chicago. Bands like The Esquires ("Get on Up") moved to Chicago before taking off nationally. It's a step ladder, often, to the bigger cultural/media center, one of (if not THE) most important ones in the history of the country, a little over an hour away. You have zero knowledge of the area or what it offers, yet you continue pushing tangential knucklehead stats and "feelings" even though you agreed with my (and ckh, and everyone else's) initial point that started the whole tangent. Milwaukee has plenty in terms of black history and identity, but in general it's tied together with Chicago's. Because they're close. And Chicago is so large. Get it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top