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Old 05-28-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Not even close to being a similar comparison at all. Again, the center city is 40% Black, the metro is 17% Black and it has the 30th biggest Black metro population in the country in terms of numbers and growing, out of 381 metros. I guess there is much more they need to do in order to be considered as having a large Blsck population.
It is a similar comparison because "large" all depends on what it's being compared to. Milwaukee's Black population is "large" compared to Carson City's. But it's not "large" in the sense that it garners any type of attention in the Black community. It's largely an afterthought like Pittsburgh or Cincinnati (which you be Black meccas by your liberal criteria).
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Old 05-28-2015, 10:56 AM
 
29,873 posts, read 27,324,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Well, I was arguing a very specific point, which was why "we don't hear about" Milwaukee's Black community. And I said that we don't "hear about" it much because it is not particularly large or upwardly mobile. That was my response to cheese plate who had stated that we don't "hear about" Milwaukee's Black population because it's "enmeshed with Chicago's." Its "enmeshment" with Chicago may be a possible factor but two more obvious factors come to mind.
I generally agree with this. Usually the cities we hear about in this context have something going for them in terms of history, cultural institutions, size, and/or economic/population growth patterns and cities like Milwaukee are generally not among those cities.
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Old 05-28-2015, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,190 posts, read 1,293,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Yeah, I don't think of Chicago and Milwaukee as having this Philadelphia-Camden or New York-Newark type of relationship. Camden and Newark are two cities that have been completely absorbed into the cultural ethos of their considerably larger neighbors. They have their own identities in a way, but for the most part, they are subordinate to Philadelphia and New York, respectively.

Milwaukee is way different. It has its own MSA and its own identity. The first thing that comes to mind for most people is probably its brewing history (Laverne & Shirley). It isn't subordinate to Chicago in any material way.

And even Baltimore and DC, as you noted, are closer than Chicago and Milwaukee, yet retain very distinct identities.

If there's one city I would say is "part and parcel with Chicago," I'd say Gary. Or maybe Joliet.
Hi new England checking in again aha. Its like Chicago-Milwaukee Boston-Providence in which case we can claim Viola Davis. She's from central falls Rhode island...the border of Massachusetts and thus no doubt spent a great deal of time in the historically much larger percentage and numbers wise black population of Boston.

Shed be in Boston according to cheese plates theory...amirite?
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:15 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 7 days ago)
 
47,974 posts, read 45,435,742 times
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Quote:
The Flat Plains- NE KS IA 3-6% black areas. Blacks here are generally forgotten and live in cities or surrounding towns that are 15-25% black. There domains appear to be somewhat run down btu largely suburban. I was told from my Chicago friend these are Black people who were pushed out of the larger and blacker Mid Western states for one reason or the other. There seems to be a high degree of anti black sentiment in these areas amongst whites. Personally I couldnt see myself living out here at all. Needing a car to go everywhere and living under permafrost in the winter. Lots of these blacks have family members that moved out west to California to pursue their dreams, and maybe in Nevada or Arizona right now. They dont seem to be country but their accent is a mix of Mid Western/Upland South with a little bit of that Black California accent. I generally like the black out there as they seem to be racially aware and down to earth. Not living in abject o poverty, not really wealthy, just living.
Something I need to clear up. Of those states, Kansas and Nebraska were home to the Black exodusters, Black southerners who left the South for the homesteads of Kansas and Nebraska after the Civil War. There is a rural BLack town of Nicodemus, Kansas: Nicodemus, Kansas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now, as for the cities, there are some famous Blacks from there. Malcolm X was born in Omaha. Barry Switzer, former NFL player, was born and raised in Wichita,Kansas. Gayle Sayers, NFL player, Omaha resident.

I would also add that in 2013, Omaha which had a murder rate around 10 murders per 100,000, had a Black murder rate of 46 murders per 100,000, worse than any other urban Black population in the USA. Nebraska as a state had the highest Black murder rate in the nation, despite having one of the lowest murder rates in the nation over all.

There is another element of the Black population in the Great Plains to consider. African refugees have gone to places like Nebraska and Kansas. Something to consider.
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:33 AM
 
56,510 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It is a similar comparison because "large" all depends on what it's being compared to. Milwaukee's Black population is "large" compared to Carson City's. But it's not "large" in the sense that it garners any type of attention in the Black community. It's largely an afterthought like Pittsburgh or Cincinnati (which you be Black meccas by your liberal criteria).
My criteria isn't liberal and I'm not talking about "Black meccas". I'm talking about straight information. Milwaukee is the 39th biggest metro and the comparison to Carson City is juvenile, bruh. Here is an article that explains the lack of profile in regards to Milwaukee in spite of its Black demographics: Why Is Milwaukee So Bad For Black People? : Code Switch : NPR So, even according to the writer, the issue is the profile due to issues in regards to its Black population, not its Black percentage/numbers.
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:51 AM
 
56,510 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Something I need to clear up. Of those states, Kansas and Nebraska were home to the Black exodusters, Black southerners who left the South for the homesteads of Kansas and Nebraska after the Civil War. There is a rural BLack town of Nicodemus, Kansas: Nicodemus, Kansas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now, as for the cities, there are some famous Blacks from there. Malcolm X was born in Omaha. Barry Switzer, former NFL player, was born and raised in Wichita,Kansas. Gayle Sayers, NFL player, Omaha resident.

I would also add that in 2013, Omaha which had a murder rate around 10 murders per 100,000, had a Black murder rate of 46 murders per 100,000, worse than any other urban Black population in the USA. Nebraska as a state had the highest Black murder rate in the nation, despite having one of the lowest murder rates in the nation over all.

There is another element of the Black population in the Great Plains to consider. African refugees have gone to places like Nebraska and Kansas. Something to consider.
Yes and Omaha's North Side is the epicenter of the Black population in the city. Omaha is about 14% Black.

Kansas City KS at around 27% Black, has the highest Black percentage out of the bigger cities between the 2 states.

In Iowa, Waterloo is 16% Black and has the Blackest neighborhoods in the state, which can go up to the 80's in terms of percentage in parts.
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It is a similar comparison because "large" all depends on what it's being compared to. Milwaukee's Black population is "large" compared to Carson City's. But it's not "large" in the sense that it garners any type of attention in the Black community. It's largely an afterthought like Pittsburgh or Cincinnati (which you be Black meccas by your liberal criteria).
I'd call a quarter million people fairly large. I realize it's not NYC, but nothing is in this country (in terms of raw numbers).
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Old 05-28-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
My criteria isn't liberal and I'm not talking about "Black meccas". I'm talking about straight information. Milwaukee is the 39th biggest metro and the comparison to Carson City is juvenile, bruh. Here is an article that explains the lack of profile in regards to Milwaukee in spite of its Black demographics: Why Is Milwaukee So Bad For Black People? : Code Switch : NPR So, even according to the writer, the issue is the profile due to issues in regards to its Black population, not its Black percentage/numbers.
I don't think there's much a point in arguing what "large" means in this context. Look what happened when people tried to distinguish among "large," "medium" and "small" metros.

Small Medium or Large - Which is it?

Suffice it to say that Milwaukee's Black population is not sufficiently large to propel it into the conversation with cities like New York, Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, Baltimore, Philadelphia, DC, Dallas, Houston, Miami or St. Louis. You can say "B, b, But those are the cities with the largest Black populations!!!" but that's sort of the point. People tend to pay attention to the Russell Westbrooks and Derrick Roses of the world, not the Langston Galloways.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I'd call a quarter million people fairly large. I realize it's not NYC, but nothing is in this country (in terms of raw numbers).
See my most recent post as well as the one below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I said that the Black communities we "hear about" are the large ones and/or the ones with upwardly mobile Black populations. Milwaukee's Black population doesn't fit either bill since it is not large in the manner of Detroit nor is it upwardly mobile and well-educated in the manner of Raleigh-Durham.
That's the bottom line. It doesn't have to compare to NYC. I mean, DC has far fewer Black people than the NYC metro. So does Baltimore. And Detroit. And Houston. And Dallas. And Philadelphia. And Miami. And Los Angeles. And Atlanta. So why does these cities consume so much of the discussion when this topic comes up?

The argument can't be "That's not fair because you're listing the biggest Black populations" because that's precisely the point. There's a reason why there are more threads about NYC, Chicago and Los Angeles on C-D than there are about Boise. The Black communities in the cities listed above are high profile preciesly because they are so damned large.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Hi new England checking in again aha. Its like Chicago-Milwaukee Boston-Providence in which case we can claim Viola Davis. She's from central falls Rhode island...the border of Massachusetts and thus no doubt spent a great deal of time in the historically much larger percentage and numbers wise black population of Boston.

Shed be in Boston according to cheese plates theory...amirite?
Providence is part of the Boston CSA so it could technically be considered "the Boston Region" even if people don't necessarily think of it that way. Milwaukee isn't part of the Chicago CSA. Saying that Milwaukee is a "satellite" of Chicago is kinda like saying that Philly is a "satellite" of New York City, which would undoubtedly **** of every Philly poster on this site.
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