U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-28-2015, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577

Advertisements

^^where did you get those numbers?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-28-2015, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
^^where did you get those numbers?
American Fact Finder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 03:48 PM
 
29,919 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18455
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I honestly don't have a precise figure in mind. If we look at the size of the cities that hog up all the attention in these discussions...

New York - 3,642,666
Atlanta - 1,819,012
Chicago - 1,705,910
Washington - 1,558,245
Philadelphia - 1,327,925
Miami - 1,225,013
Houston - 1,086,242
Dallas - 1,044,036
Detroit - 1,018,009
Los Angeles - 1,003,285
Baltimore - 823,993
Memphis - 618,429
St. Louis - 541,429
Bay Area - 478,494
New Orleans - 427,208
Boston - 419,693

Maybe "large" in absolute terms would be anything more than 400,000. And by "large," I mean enough people to register in the minds of the average Black person. Pittsburgh has around 220,000 Black people, and having grown up in Philly, I can tell you that a lot of people there are surprised to find out there are Black people there at all. They are kind of an "unknown" over there.
I think midsized or historic Southern metros in particular also count here, like Charlotte, Birmingham, Richmond, Norfolk/Hampton Roads, Jacksonville, Charleston, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think midsized or historic Southern metros in particular also count here, like Charlotte, Birmingham, Richmond, Norfolk/Hampton Roads, Jacksonville, Charleston, etc.
They would probably be the next tier down (though some might rank ahead of Boston given its generally poor reputation in the Black community). After you've gotten past those cities, then you get to places like Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Columbus, etc.

Personally, I hear a lot about Charlotte and Raleigh because they are popular relocation destinations for New Yorkers. I can't tell you much about the other cities that really distinguishes them from other Southern cities (except for the Geechee in Charleston). I think people are generally aware that the South has a lot of Black people, but many don't know enough specifically about any one city to distinguish one from another (what is the difference between the AA community in Greensboro vs Charlotte vs Columbia, for example?).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 04:13 PM
 
29,919 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18455
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
They would probably be the next tier down (though some might rank ahead of Boston given its generally poor reputation in the Black community). After you've gotten past those cities, then you get to places like Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Columbus, etc.
I can agree with that.

Quote:
Personally, I hear a lot about Charlotte and Raleigh because they are popular relocation destinations for New Yorkers. I can't tell you much about the other cities that really distinguishes them from other Southern cities (except for the Geechee in Charleston). I think people are generally aware that the South has a lot of Black people, but many don't know enough specifically about any one city to distinguish one from another (what is the difference between the AA community in Greensboro vs Charlotte vs Columbia, for example?).
I think people are mostly aware of the size differences which would separate Charlotte from Columbia and Greensboro, but even that's not a given. I've heard countless stories about how people visited Charlotte for the first time and had no idea it's as large as it is. From a Black perspective, most people's familiarity will be via family or educational ties (A&T and Bennett in Greensboro, JCSU in Charlotte, Benedict and Allen in Columbia).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 05:15 PM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
And there isn't data to back up Seattle's Italian population in relation to others? Are there 29 metro areas with a larger Italian population than Seattle's? I doubt it. Since its Italian population is much larger than the hundreds of metros below it, why wouldn't you say it has a "large" Italian population. If your whole entire exercise involves looking at the full list of 388 metropolitan statistical areas, and then taking the Top 50, then why wouldn't it be?

If you're going to say that Milwaukee has a large Black population because it is bigger than that of Fresno, Grand Rapids, Omaha, Worcester, Albany, Hartford, El Paso, Dayton, Stockton, Colorado Springs, Boise, Wichita, Ogden, Des Moines, Provo, Salt Lake City, Scranton, Youngstown, Santa Rosa, Reno, Asheville, Killeen, Waco, Myrtle Beach, Wilmington, Salem, Spartanburg, Boulder, Lubbock, Duluth, Erie, Laredo, Cedar Rapids, Hagerstown, Appleton, Burlington, Springfield, Florence, Lake Charles, Athens, Redding and many others, then why not say the same about Seattle's Italian population in relation to these same MSAs? Against this type of competition, yes, it will indeed shine in an absolute sense (and even on a percentage basis). But realistically, nobody's going to say it has a "large" Italian population. The same is true of Milwaukee.

This is sort of like having a conversation in the barbershop about whether Darko Milicic is a good player. Most people would say he's not, but if you point out that he's a better player than everyone on C-D and 99% of the rest of the human population, then you'd have a point (I guess). In such discussions, however, most people understand that "good" is based on starting from the Top of the NBA food chain on down. When people say Darko is "sorry," they are comparing him to the likes of Dwight Howard, Nene and the Gasol brothers, not you or me.
Actually, the Syracuse area has as many Italians as Seattle, but Seattle does have the percentage. That is why I'm saying that it isn't a equal comparison, because Milwaukee has the above average/high city and metro percentage along with the relatively high population in terms of numbers. In that regard, it is actually in the same company as Jacksonville, Baton Rouge, Columbia, Greensboro, Jackson, Columbus, Indianapolis and Cincinnati.

Anyway, my point about mentioning other areas has more to do with Black folks thinking outside of the box in terms of research and using different outlets besides the mainstream outlets. Hence, my earlier statement about going beyond the mainstream, even in terms of Black media. I dare say that Black people and mainstream has a love/hate relationship in this country and considering what has happened to many Black media outlets, I honestly encourage Black folks to look into outlets/forms of research.

As for the numbers, so 400,000 is the "large" Black population criteria. Like Mutiny mentioned, I'd at least consider the Southern metros he mentioned. How did Boston's Black community grow so fast from around 331,000 in 2010 to that current figure? Again, here are the 2010 numbers: BlackDemographics.com | Black City Population Where's Cleveland, Norfolk, Richmond and Richmond, like Mutiny mentioned?

I'll try to contact Mr. DeShay about the numbers.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 05-28-2015 at 05:28 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577
400,000 is the criteria for having a large Black population? Interesting, the one metro that is always talked about as not having a large black population and presence is the Bay Area and they have just under 500,000 Blacks. Now I will say from that population comes a very influential population especially in hip hop. But still interesting to see that this is the criteria.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:12 PM
 
29,919 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18455
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
400,000 is the criteria for having a large Black population? Interesting, the one metro that is always talked about as not having a large black population and presence is the Bay Area and they have just under 500,000 Blacks. Now I will say from that population comes a very influential population especially in hip hop. But still interesting to see that this is the criteria.
Well I think most knowledgeable people know that Oakland in particular has a sizable Black population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 08:35 PM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Well I think most knowledgeable people know that Oakland in particular has a sizable Black population.
Yeah, if the Bay Area was split up directionally, the East Bay would definitely have the bulk of the Black population. I don't know if it would have 400,000 Black people, but I'd guess that it would have about 250,000-300,000 Black people. I believe that the East Bay is a respectable 11-14% Black, depending in who you count.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 05-28-2015 at 08:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2015, 11:34 PM
 
114 posts, read 88,319 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
To be honest, it would be nice to talk about other areas besides the 10-15 it seems that Black folks are relegated to in order to be "successful" or however one would put it. Why not mention the small mostly Black middle class area in suburban Harrisburg or the Black professionals in Columbus?

City-data doesn't acknowledge that Columbus exist. You know that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top