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Old 06-12-2015, 01:27 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 11 days ago)
 
48,098 posts, read 45,475,380 times
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Quote:
This the guy that set up Nicodemus: Benjamin "Pap" Singleton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Stuff like this is never taught. A small bit might have been mentioned about Marcus Garvey. However, no one mentions this guy.

Looking back on my teenage years, I'm thankful that I liked reading. It was the one way I ever learned about Nicodemus at all. I read about it in a National Geographic article written in 1985 about Kansas.
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Old 06-12-2015, 01:50 PM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Stuff like this is never taught. A small bit might have been mentioned about Marcus Garvey. However, no one mentions this guy.

Looking back on my teenage years, I'm thankful that I liked reading. It was the one way I ever learned about Nicodemus at all. I read about it in a National Geographic article written in 1985 about Kansas.
I know, man and it is a shame. For instance, even in my area, Harriet Tubman gets mentioned a lot(as she should), but hardly anyone(except for a couple of radio personalities) mentions this guy that is very similar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jermain_Wesley_Loguen

Or this woman who was born/grew up in the area: Edmonia Highgate
Edmonia Goodelle Highgate (1844 - 1870) - Find A Grave Memorial

You have this woman that had a similar upbringing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Barrier_Williams

Not too many people know about this organization which formed in Albany: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americ...ry_Association

Blacks and the American Missionary Association - United Church of Christ

Or this school: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Free_School

So, if you keep looking, you will find plenty of pleasant surprises.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 06-12-2015 at 02:24 PM..
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:13 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 11 days ago)
 
48,098 posts, read 45,475,380 times
Reputation: 15328
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I know, man and it is a shame. For instance, even in my area, Harriet Tubman gets mentioned a lot(as she should), but hardly anyone(except for a couple of radio personalities) mentions this guy that is very similar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jermain_Wesley_Loguen

Or this woman who was born/grew up in the area: Edmonia Highgate
Edmonia Goodelle Highgate (1844 - 1870) - Find A Grave Memorial

Not too many people know about this organization which formed in Albany: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americ...ry_Association
http://www.ucc.org/about-us_hidden-h...d-the-American

So, if you keep looking, you will find plenty of pleasant surprises.
Interesting you had the link about the American Missionary Association. I read an excerpt written by Thomas Sowell. One thing mentioned was how missionaries would set up schools for the newly freed Blacks in the South. The idea was to educate Blacks and to help them get adjusted to society. That association was doing more for the freedmen than the actual Freedman's Bureau.

I will point this out. One major affect of slavery was being exposed to a culture that didn't value education, a culture so prominent in the South during antebellum times. The AMA educating Blacks was meant to put Blacks into something more positive. Unfortunately, like many things meant to help Blacks durng Reconstruction, there were those who were used to being in power, and seeing Blacks getting educated was something they didn't like. Seeing Blacks vote, seeing Blacks actually participating in society, it was something many in the South didn't want to see from Blacks, because there were people used to the idea of "Whites at the top, Blacks at the bottom", the old racial hierarchy of the antebellum days. One of the reasons the KKK rose to power.

Now, I was taught about Reconstruction, and the Freedman's Bureau. I was never taught about the American Missionary Association. Then again, that is the school system I was in. The more I read, the more I learn, the more I understand what the schools I went to failed to teach me.
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:29 PM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Interesting you had the link about the American Missionary Association. I read an excerpt written by Thomas Sowell. One thing mentioned was how missionaries would set up schools for the newly freed Blacks in the South. The idea was to educate Blacks and to help them get adjusted to society. That association was doing more for the freedmen than the actual Freedman's Bureau.

I will point this out. One major affect of slavery was being exposed to a culture that didn't value education, a culture so prominent in the South during antebellum times. The AMA educating Blacks was meant to put Blacks into something more positive. Unfortunately, like many things meant to help Blacks durng Reconstruction, there were those who were used to being in power, and seeing Blacks getting educated was something they didn't like. Seeing Blacks vote, seeing Blacks actually participating in society, it was something many in the South didn't want to see from Blacks, because there were people used to the idea of "Whites at the top, Blacks at the bottom", the old racial hierarchy of the antebellum days. One of the reasons the KKK rose to power.

Now, I was taught about Reconstruction, and the Freedman's Bureau. I was never taught about the American Missionary Association. Then again, that is the school system I was in. The more I read, the more I learn, the more I understand what the schools I went to failed to teach me.
This is all true and many do not realize that the AMA played a part in setting up HBCU's that are still around today. You also had these schools that had an influence on those in the AMA: Oneida Institute

McGraw Historical Society - The New York Central College**New York Central College McGrawville was an institution of higher learning founded by anti-slavery Baptists in 1849 in New York. The college was notable because it educated blacks as well as w

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New-Yo...e,_McGrawville

The latter is the first predominately White institute of higher learning in the US to have a Black professor.
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Old 06-16-2015, 10:51 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 11 days ago)
 
48,098 posts, read 45,475,380 times
Reputation: 15328
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
This is all true and many do not realize that the AMA played a part in setting up HBCU's that are still around today. You also had these schools that had an influence on those in the AMA: Oneida Institute

McGraw Historical Society - The New York Central College**New York Central College McGrawville was an institution of higher learning founded by anti-slavery Baptists in 1849 in New York. The college was notable because it educated blacks as well as w

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New-Yo...e,_McGrawville

The latter is the first predominately White institute of higher learning in the US to have a Black professor.
What was sad though was that there were some hateful attitudes towards interracial marriage. Something like that caused major problems.
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Old 06-16-2015, 10:57 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 11 days ago)
 
48,098 posts, read 45,475,380 times
Reputation: 15328
And another bit of Oklahoma Black history.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_P._McCabe

McCabe discussed the possibility of creating a majority Black state in Oklahoma.
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Old 06-16-2015, 12:27 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,048,618 times
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I've lived in RI, FL, GA, TX, AZ and CA--in that order, sort of.

IME, blacks were most integrated in AZ (probably due to the fact AZ has the fewest blacks per capita of any state in which I've lived, most of whom are transplants) followed by TX, CA, RI, FL and GA--in that order.

Regarding black culture, it was obviously strongest in GA followed by FL, TX, CA, RI and AZ--in that order.
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Old 06-18-2015, 12:39 PM
 
99 posts, read 130,798 times
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#6 is definetly my favorite, and that region of blacks are very unique. Personality wise, they're simalar. South Texas and louisiana are the Music and hiphop meccas of this region, and Arkansas is more blues, gospel, and R&b since it thrives on its delta heritage. North texas and arkansas have more serious personalities. Also, the blacks population are some of the friendliest in America. It is a poor region, but alot of African Americans tend to work for themselves in this area. Central, Eastern and Southern Arkansas is litter with world renown black history as well as all of Louisiana. Religion is very domanant and being outdoors is a norm. Houston, Dallas, and little rock are some of the most Underrated and overlooked, diverse cities in America. Crime is high in these areas, but theyre concercentated in small areas. Houston, Dallas, and New Orleans are world cities, but cities like Austin, Little Rock, and Baton Rouge are the next cities that are on the Up and Coming list in the south and nation. The Delta Region in Louisiana and Arkansas are some of the Poorest in the Nation, but they have a very low cost of living. So even when the economy isnt going right, the people dont hit rock bottom as hard as most others do in other states. Blacks here have very little in common with blacks from other regions, and i think thats how they like it. People here dont really like huge urban sprawl like you would find in the North or the East. Blacks move to theses areas to get away from the new yorks, boston, atl kind of areas, for something Cheaper and quieter. Even Dallas and Houston areant as fast pace as other cities their size, but their cheap and very livable....

Last edited by ajsalim123; 06-18-2015 at 01:40 PM..
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Old 06-18-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajsalim123 View Post
#6 is definetly my favorite, and that region of blacks are very unique. Personality wise, they're simalar. South Texas and louisiana are the Music and hiphop meccas of this region, and Arkansas is more blues, gospel, and R&b since it thrives on its delta heritage. North texas and arkansas have more serious personalities. Also, the blacks population are some of the friendliest in America. It is a poor region, but alot of African Americans tend to work for themselves in this area. Central, Eastern and Southern Arkansas is litter with world renown black history as well as all of Louisiana. Religion is very domanant and being outdoors is a norm. Houston, Dallas, and little rock are some of the most Underrated and overlooked, diverse cities in America. Crime is high in these areas, but theyre concercentated in small areas. Houston, Dallas, and New Orleans are world cities, but cities like Austin, Little Rock, and Baton Rouge are the next cities that are on the Up and Coming list in the south and nation. The Delta Region in Louisiana and Arkansas are some of the Poorest in the Nation, but they have a very low cost of living. So even when the economy isnt going right, the people dont hit rock bottom as hard as most others do in other states. Blacks here have very little in common with blacks from other regions, and i think thats how they like it. People here dont really like huge urban sprawl like you would find in the North or the East. Blacks move to theses areas to get away from the new yorks, boston, atl kind of areas, for something Cheaper and quieter. Even Dallas and Houston areant as fast pace as other cities their size, but their cheap and very livable....
Agree with most but not all of what you're saying.
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Old 09-17-2015, 05:08 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,539 posts, read 2,319,369 times
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Out of curiosity, what are the major differences between Blacks in the NYC area and Southern New England? We know that the accent is one of those differences but that's also a big difference between Philly and NYC.

TBH, I could never tell much of a difference between Black Bostonians and Black New Yorkers (other than accent). They dressed very similarly and the stylistic difference between artists like Benzino and Gangstarr and New York artists was basically non-existent. Both cities have a strong West Indian influence, which Philadelphia lacks.

Philly is a mix of its neighbors to its North and South. Its similar to DC and Baltimore in having a Black population largely of American South origin. When I think of Philly, I think more of old school players cruising along Lansdowne in clean Cadillacs with Frankie Beverly or the Delfonics playing for the whole entire neighborhood to hear. It's also a bit similar to Chicago in this way, imo. New York and Boston have a different flavor.

However, Philadelphians have earned a reputation of having a lot of "tood." And in that sense, I'd say Black Philadelphians are more similar to New Yorkers. Both cities were also early incubators of hip hop culture in the late 70s/early 80s.
repped. although i always thought that nyc's black population is african american.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Theres so many more in the north east. Especially new England where if you were to not interact with them your social circles would be noticeably smaller. The AA culture is easiest to identify with and be a part of in america but the west Indian hispanic numbers boost it. Look at a state like Rhode Island that has probably 2 or even 3 times as many Dominicans as AS with southern roots. In most circles I've ever rolled with in mass and Rhode island we never even think about hispanic as being hispanic..only when at a party and they play merengue bachata or salsa...some times we laugh but if they play too much of that were like "you....wheres the dancehall/hip hop??" its alsk because we live in all the same neighborhoods for the most part...Philly I don't even really count because even there I feel like its a somewhat small population of segregated Puerto ricans..the hispanic vibe is there...but it so overshadowed by the African American vibe. Up north its all split up so manh ways between west Africans..west indians....mixed people...AAs.

Here a quick breakdown of a Few famous black people from massachusetts that I could think of off the top of my head. Very mixed batch

Patrick Ewing (NBA HOF'er) Jamaican
Michael Beach (from Soul Food and The Game) Cape Verdean
Bobby brown (New Edition) African American
Shabazz Napier (Miami Heat) Puerto Rican and haitian
Nerlens Noel (Philadelphia 76ers) haitian
Poach hall (the game) cape Verdean and African american
Dana barros (former Nba All Star) cape verdean
Tavares (soul group) cape verdean
Louis farrakhan African american but mixed
Patrice oneal (decease comedian) African american
James Ihedigbo (NFL player) Nigerian
Donna summer African american
Guru (rapper) Barbadian and African American [deceased]
Michael Carter Williams (Milwaukee bucks) White and African American.
Benzino (founder of the source, love and hip hop Atlanta) 1/2 cape verdean 1/4 white 1/4 trinidadian

A list for Rhode island would have more Dominicans and cape Verdeans... A list for CT will be more Jamaican Puerto Rican and African american...Heavily Jamaican though.

In short with such a diluted AA cultural presence black in this area are morenopen when it comes to who is like them and with whom they share similarities and culture with IMO.
its amazing that all 3 were first rounders (witin the top ten picks in the draft) 2 years ago.

Last edited by stanley-88888888; 09-17-2015 at 05:35 PM..
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