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Old 06-14-2019, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Boston
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Most regular people ( not on CD) look only at city proper for anything
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Old 06-14-2019, 12:30 PM
 
29,888 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Most regular people ( not on CD) look only at city proper for anything
If they even bother to look anything up at all. People who are familiar with certain places already have a sense of how big or small they are in real life regardless of what city proper population stats might say. When talking about a Bostonian looking at a similarly-sized place in the South to relocate to, Atlanta will win out over Charlotte regardless of city proper stats telling them that Charlotte is bigger (than both).
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Old 06-14-2019, 12:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Right. You'll be surprise if we could take anonymous poll on how many americans factor in city proper population when moving to a new city or visiting. Myself for example is one of them ( LoL), I'll never moved to a city with 1 million+ residents within the proper. That's too many for my comfort.
So you wouldn't move to San Antonio off the bat, but Atlanta, Miami, and DC would be options?

Suppose you moved to a city that was under a million, but the next year it consolidated with its county and that put the city proper population over 1 million. Would you then move? What does it actually change in real life?
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Old 06-14-2019, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,030 posts, read 627,203 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
So you wouldn't move to San Antonio off the bat, but Atlanta, Miami, and DC would be options?

Suppose you moved to a city that was under a million, but the next year it consolidated with its county and that put the city proper population over 1 million. Would you then move? What does it actually change in real life?
Nope to San Antonio.
Maybe to the rest but not guareenteed. Got fam in the ATL metro ( no surprise there). I was there last year.

If that city was already under 1 mill then i wouldn't move to it anyways.
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:23 PM
 
1,822 posts, read 530,659 times
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Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Most regular people ( not on CD) look only at city proper for anything
Exactly. I almost never hear people talk about metro areas in NYC.

Then again, there are places like Atlanta where people refer to the suburbs as being part of Atlanta too.
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Old 06-15-2019, 01:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Nope to San Antonio.
Maybe to the rest but not guareenteed. Got fam in the ATL metro ( no surprise there). I was there last year.

If that city was already under 1 mill then i wouldn't move to it anyways.
I'm asking the question based on nothing but population.

You wouldn't move to San Antonio because it's too big for you based on city proper population (1M+) alone, but Atlanta, DC, Miami, etc. aren't too big for you because they have city proper populations under 1 million?

I'm not getting the logic at all.
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Old 06-15-2019, 01:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
Exactly. I almost never hear people talk about metro areas in NYC.
You've never heard of the nickname the "Tri-State Area"? You've also got Chicagoland, the Bay Area, etc. In those regions, you have a pretty solid distinction between the primary city/cities and the suburbs, but they do have their own particular terms for the larger region and suburban portions of the larger region; they just usually don't include the actual term "metro."

Quote:
Then again, there are places like Atlanta where people refer to the suburbs as being part of Atlanta too.
Yes. This is primarily because all of metro Atlanta is contained within the same state (so there's nothing like NoVA or northern Kentucky), revolves around an undisputed primary city with no true secondary urban centers like Dallas-Fort Worth (nicknamed the Metroplex), Raleigh/Durham (the Triangle), VA Beach-Norfolk (Hampton Roads/Tidewater), etc., and Atlanta is a young city that was small in the prewar period unlike Northern urban centers that were already large and established before the dawn of the postwar suburban era which makes for a more stark contrast between the central city and the 'burbs.
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Old 06-15-2019, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,030 posts, read 627,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'm asking the question based on nothing but population.

You wouldn't move to San Antonio because it's too big for you based on city proper population (1M+) alone, but Atlanta, DC, Miami, etc. aren't too big for you because they have city proper populations under 1 million?

I'm not getting the logic at all.
Yes. Well going by your picks, Atlanta/ Miami/D.C are more smaller than S.A by proper. Again, I said MAYBE. I don't care to be in overly crowded cities per say and of course traffic. Reminds me of last year in the ATL metro, stuck in traffic on the Interstate half an hour west outside of the city proper.

My question to you: Are you living your life by metro metrics?
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Old 06-15-2019, 04:01 PM
 
1,822 posts, read 530,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You've never heard of the nickname the "Tri-State Area"? You've also got Chicagoland, the Bay Area, etc. In those regions, you have a pretty solid distinction between the primary city/cities and the suburbs, but they do have their own particular terms for the larger region and suburban portions of the larger region; they just usually don't include the actual term "metro."



Yes. This is primarily because all of metro Atlanta is contained within the same state (so there's nothing like NoVA or northern Kentucky), revolves around an undisputed primary city with no true secondary urban centers like Dallas-Fort Worth (nicknamed the Metroplex), Raleigh/Durham (the Triangle), VA Beach-Norfolk (Hampton Roads/Tidewater), etc., and Atlanta is a young city that was small in the prewar period unlike Northern urban centers that were already large and established before the dawn of the postwar suburban era which makes for a more stark contrast between the central city and the 'burbs.
Yeah but I don't hear people fixate on metros the way they do here. They might use terms like tri state area to refer to a broader region, but when talking about NYC, nobody cares about Suffolk or Dutchess county.
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Old 06-15-2019, 06:37 PM
 
1,194 posts, read 585,574 times
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Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Nope to San Antonio.
Maybe to the rest but not guareenteed. Got fam in the ATL metro ( no surprise there). I was there last year.

If that city was already under 1 mill then i wouldn't move to it anyways.
Metro Atlanta is 6 million souls vs 2.5 million for greater San Antonio. It's not like the suburban dwellers aren't adding, good or bad, to the quality of life for Atlanta.
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