U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-15-2019, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,030 posts, read 625,717 times
Reputation: 638

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by walker1962 View Post
Metro Atlanta is 6 million souls vs 2.5 million for greater San Antonio. It's not like the suburban dwellers aren't adding, good or bad, to the quality of life for Atlanta.
They're definitely adding to the traffic
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-16-2019, 07:51 AM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Yes. Well going by your picks, Atlanta/ Miami/D.C are more smaller than S.A by proper. Again, I said MAYBE. I don't care to be in overly crowded cities per say and of course traffic. Reminds me of last year in the ATL metro, stuck in traffic on the Interstate half an hour west outside of the city proper.
So you think San Antonio is overly crowded and has worse traffic than Atlanta because it has a city proper population of 1M+ and Atlanta doesn't? You don't think that people living in the surrounding region (suburbs) contribute to a feeling of being overly crowded and traffic?

Quote:
My question to you: Are you living your life by metro metrics?
I prefer to live in major metropolitan areas of at least 2M or so. I realize this now more than ever having moved back to SC about a year ago. I'm definitely having major city withdrawals LOL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 08:03 AM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
Yeah but I don't hear people fixate on metros the way they do here. They might use terms like tri state area to refer to a broader region, but when talking about NYC, nobody cares about Suffolk or Dutchess county.
NYC refers to the city only whereas Tri-State area refers to the larger region. It's much easier to decipher whether people are referring to the city itself or the larger region in this case because two different terms are used to refer to them both, plus the different suburban areas tend to have their own identity too.

NYC is more of an anomaly anyway as the country's biggest, most urban city, containing 40-50% of the metro area population (which is easily the biggest share among all major metros); it is in a class all by itself and has no peers in America so you don't really have to use other metrics to demonstrate that. On top of that, even when some people talk about NYC or "the city," they are only talking about Manhattan and not the entire city which makes NYC even more unique. It's definitely the case that more people "fixate" on the metro area when it comes to the country's second-largest city, LA, which is built differently and doesn't contain as large of a share of the regional population within its city limits.

Last edited by Mutiny77; 06-16-2019 at 08:13 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,030 posts, read 625,717 times
Reputation: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
So you think San Antonio is overly crowded and has worse traffic than Atlanta because it has a city proper population of 1M+ and Atlanta doesn't? You don't think that people living in the surrounding region (suburbs) contribute to a feeling of being overly crowded and traffic?
Nope, i didn't say that towards S.A specifically. It's in regards to all large cities of that populous size.

[QUOTE/]I prefer to live in major metropolitan areas of at least 2M or so. I realize this now more than ever having moved back to SC about a year ago. I'm definitely having major city withdrawals LOL.[/quote]

You see, that's your taste not mine. Opinion & lifestyle differs by person. I like to visit cities/metros of that size but not interested in living there. If i wasn't born or raised in that type of locale, I'm not moving there. I prefer small to mid size cities personally.

Last edited by Sharif662; 06-16-2019 at 11:48 AM.. Reason: Additional info.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 11:56 AM
 
1,819 posts, read 528,464 times
Reputation: 1199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NYC refers to the city only whereas Tri-State area refers to the larger region. It's much easier to decipher whether people are referring to the city itself or the larger region in this case because two different terms are used to refer to them both, plus the different suburban areas tend to have their own identity too.

NYC is more of an anomaly anyway as the country's biggest, most urban city, containing 40-50% of the metro area population (which is easily the biggest share among all major metros); it is in a class all by itself and has no peers in America so you don't really have to use other metrics to demonstrate that. On top of that, even when some people talk about NYC or "the city," they are only talking about Manhattan and not the entire city which makes NYC even more unique. It's definitely the case that more people "fixate" on the metro area when it comes to the country's second-largest city, LA, which is built differently and doesn't contain as large of a share of the regional population within its city limits.
I agree with what you're saying for the most part. But I still don't think most people outside of CD are thinking about suburbs when they discuss cities (even ones that aren't New York). Although there are exceptions to this like Atlanta and LA.

As for the bolded: yeah but that doesn't imply that the outer boroughs are not part of the city. It's just a suburbanite thing that has leaked into NYC parlance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,030 posts, read 625,717 times
Reputation: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NYC is more of an anomaly anyway as the country's biggest, most urban city, containing 40-50% of the metro area population (which is easily the biggest share among all major metros);
I disagree if i understand your context here. If you mean a share of the metro population (40-50%) lives in the city proper then nope. Memphis easily comes to mind with over 60% of the metro population living inside the core city. I notice the difference in infrastructure of a metro when more lives in the core vs outside of it ( Memphis v ATL layout per say).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 02:53 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Nope, i didn't say that towards S.A specifically. It's in regards to all large cities of that populous size.
But that makes no sense primarily because you're completely disregarding density. Having 1M people within 100 square miles is completely different than having 1M people in 500 square miles. And of course, you're also not accounting for how many people live in the immediate area outside of the city proper. In short, city population figures in and of themselves don't tell you much; they require context which you completely omit.

Quote:
You see, that's your taste not mine.
Right...which you asked me about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,030 posts, read 625,717 times
Reputation: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But that makes no sense primarily because you're completely disregarding density. Having 1M people within 100 square miles is completely different than having 1M people in 500 square miles. And of course, you're also not accounting for how many people live in the immediate area outside of the city proper. In short, city population figures in and of themselves don't tell you much; they require context which you completely omit.
It make no sense to you because your messaging a person who doesn't want to live in that environment. Scale down qnd you'll understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 03:45 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,767 posts, read 2,551,535 times
Reputation: 2978
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
Just imagine being black in the Mountian West states like Wyoming or Montana. Things can feel pretty awkward if you're use to being around mostly black people.
Not if you get a kick out of the different faces people make, and aren't afraid of strangers. I love places like that due to these very things. People have no idea sometimes just how much their face is saying.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2019, 03:56 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I agree with what you're saying for the most part. But I still don't think most people outside of CD are thinking about suburbs when they discuss cities (even ones that aren't New York). Although there are exceptions to this like Atlanta and LA.
It's a lot more common than you think but you living in NYC, you're not exposed to it as much. Truthfully NYC and the handful of other cities like it in this regard (Philly, Chicago, SF, etc.) are more the exception. Most other places have no qualms with including neighboring developed areas as "the city" because in those places, they functionally are. It's perfectly reasonable for people to include Alexandria and Arlington when talking about DC or Cambridge and Somerville when talking about Boston and so on and so forth.

Quote:
As for the bolded: yeah but that doesn't imply that the outer boroughs are not part of the city. It's just a suburbanite thing that has leaked into NYC parlance.
It's just another way that NYC is unique. Not only is there a hard city/suburb distinction, but there are levels of urbanity within the city itself based on borough. Staten Islands is kinda treated as the suburban red-headed stepchild and most of Queens is seen as far removed from the rest of the city. Brooklyn and Bronx are like the innermost neighborhoods while Manhattan is seen as the downtown itself, the ultimate expression of urbanity. It makes sense that you have these different characterizations of each borough when you remember that they are all individual counties, and certainly counties tend to be characterized in their own distinct ways within a metro area. It's just that in NYC, the region's core counties comprise the actual city of New York. Highly unique in the U.S. with no real equivalent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top