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Old 06-20-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
349 posts, read 107,435 times
Reputation: 330

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Yeah, people in NYC do tend to disgust themselves from the suburbs. When people say they're from NYC the generally mean the 5 boros. Can't speak for the rest of the Bos-Wash corridor but I know a girl from NH who claims Boston as her hometown but she she does say she lives outside of Boston. Most people do tend to say their from a certain city but live in the suburbs especially ATL people. NYC is big enough to where it doesn't need the rest of the tri state area. The city alone contains 5 counties.
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Old 06-20-2019, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Boston
2,216 posts, read 1,301,825 times
Reputation: 2050
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
Yeah, people in NYC do tend to disgust themselves from the suburbs. When people say they're from NYC the generally mean the 5 boros. Can't speak for the rest of the Bos-Wash corridor but I know a girl from NH who claims Boston as her hometown but she she does say she lives outside of Boston. Most people do tend to say their from a certain city but live in the suburbs especially ATL people. NYC is big enough to where it doesn't need the rest of the tri state area. The city alone contains 5 counties.
White people from NH say Boston because they think that they ought to be able to claim Boston because they are white. They use the excuse “well you wouldn’t know where I was from!” And I reply so?? You’re from nowhere...own it ����*♂️. Anywhere in NH is at least 35 miles from Boston and at least 20 miles from urbanity.. NH is cow country. People who claim Boston like that usually have only gone for fields trips and are thoroughly ridiculed and rebuffed by Bostonians and people who actually live in adjacent cities. Based off New England has strong and defined town identities there are people in those towns who think you’re a poser for not claiming said town.
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Old 06-21-2019, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,211 posts, read 2,828,597 times
Reputation: 4497
I don't know how I've missed this thread, but just to touch on a few recent talking points:

•in the real world most people mean the actual city when they say the city. No, it isn't uncommon for people to reference a city and be talking about the entire metro, either, but both can be and are true. Not uncommon, but when people say a city name, they mostly mean the actual city......this website can put you out of touch with reality...

•this wasn't a specific talking point, more so just casually referenced. I've mentioned this before on here------>the gap between NY and LA is exaggerated online. It isn't true that NY has no peers, and real world experience is the tell when comparing the gravitas both cities have. They are different for sure, and for sure NY is older and larger, but there it is a pretty gross exaggeration to say LA isn't a peer...

But for its age and the resulting legacy institutions because of that, LA is a relative equal of New York almost across the board, pick a metric. And LA has nearly caught up to NY in barely over a century, whereas NY has almost a 300-year head start in development....

•California is unique in that we simultaneously talk about the city in a metro sense, while also proudly delineating city borders. It's pretty unique and you'll hear someone in the same sentence imply that Inglewood is Los Angeles (which, like other places around the nation, practically serves as an LA neighborhood rather than a completely separate entity) while also specifying that Inglewood is a different city...
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Old 06-21-2019, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,038 posts, read 630,010 times
Reputation: 643
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
I don't know how I've missed this thread, but just to touch on a few recent talking points:

in the real world most people mean the actual city when they say the city. No, it isn't uncommon for people to reference a city and be talking about the entire metro, either, but both can be and are true. Not uncommon, but when people say a city name, they mostly mean the actual city......this website can put you out of touch with reality...

•this wasn't a specific talking point, more so just casually referenced. I've mentioned this before on here------>the gap between NY and LA is exaggerated online. It isn't true that NY has no peers, and real world experience is the tell when comparing the gravitas both cities have. They are different for sure, and for sure NY is older and larger, but there it is a pretty gross exaggeration to say LA isn't a peer...

But for its age and the resulting legacy institutions because of that, LA is a relative equal of New York almost across the board, pick a metric. And LA has nearly caught up to NY in barely over a century, whereas NY has almost a 300-year head start in development....

•California is unique in that we simultaneously talk about the city in a metro sense, while also proudly delineating city borders. It's pretty unique and you'll hear someone in the same sentence imply that Inglewood is Los Angeles (which, like other places around the nation, practically serves as an LA neighborhood rather than a completely separate entity) while also specifying that Inglewood is a different city...
I thought you was already in the convo Murk, LoL. You further prove what I stated ( Bolded) and the ambiguous viewpoints. When we're speaking on Black culture by region , people often overlook the non metros areas. Regional distinctions also have to include the micro areas & rural too.
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Old 06-21-2019, 12:53 PM
 
29,933 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
I don't know how I've missed this thread, but just to touch on a few recent talking points:

•in the real world most people mean the actual city when they say the city. No, it isn't uncommon for people to reference a city and be talking about the entire metro, either, but both can be and are true. Not uncommon, but when people say a city name, they mostly mean the actual city......this website can put you out of touch with reality...
I think for most places, when people mention a city they are talking about the city and close-in suburbs that have amenities associated with the city itself. So they will talk about Boston and Harvard, Chicago and Northwestern, DC and Reagan, etc. etc.

Quote:
•this wasn't a specific talking point, more so just casually referenced. I've mentioned this before on here------>the gap between NY and LA is exaggerated online. It isn't true that NY has no peers, and real world experience is the tell when comparing the gravitas both cities have. They are different for sure, and for sure NY is older and larger, but there it is a pretty gross exaggeration to say LA isn't a peer...

But for its age and the resulting legacy institutions because of that, LA is a relative equal of New York almost across the board, pick a metric. And LA has nearly caught up to NY in barely over a century, whereas NY has almost a 300-year head start in development....
NYC doesn't have any actual peers in the context I was speaking of. It has over 8M people in five counties; no other US city is close to being as populous with a similar type of set-up. And there's a pretty hard city/suburb line for NYC; if you're from Yonkers or White Plains and try and say you're from NYC, you'll get put in your place pretty quick.

Quote:
•California is unique in that we simultaneously talk about the city in a metro sense, while also proudly delineating city borders. It's pretty unique and you'll hear someone in the same sentence imply that Inglewood is Los Angeles (which, like other places around the nation, practically serves as an LA neighborhood rather than a completely separate entity) while also specifying that Inglewood is a different city...
And that doesn't happen in NYC where the city is the city and the suburbs are the suburbs.

Anyway, I hope we don't get dragged back into the abyss here and the larger point gets missed. I don't think people are referring to the whole MSA when they reference a particular city but with very few exceptions like NYC, I also believe they aren't talking about ONLY the official municipality/city proper either. In most cases, they are referring to the city proper and close-in suburbs (except those that may be in another state, but it depends), particularly when they have amenities that are associated with the city itself. Most people don't know where the city proper or MSA boundaries for a place begin or end, so they rely on the "eye test" and common sense which doesn't go as far out as the MSA but typically extends beyond the city proper. Even in Atlanta that's the case as you won't see people referring to the outer suburban counties like Dawson or Butts as "Atlanta" but they will talk about places like SunTrust Park and the Arena at Gwinnett as being in Atlanta.
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Old 06-21-2019, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,211 posts, read 2,828,597 times
Reputation: 4497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think for most places, when people mention a city they are talking about the city and close-in suburbs that have amenities associated with the city itself. So they will talk about Boston and Harvard, Chicago and Northwestern, DC and Reagan, etc. etc.



NYC doesn't have any actual peers in the context I was speaking of. It has over 8M people in five counties; no other US city is close to being as populous with a similar type of set-up. And there's a pretty hard city/suburb line for NYC; if you're from Yonkers or White Plains and try and say you're from NYC, you'll get put in your place pretty quick.



And that doesn't happen in NYC where the city is the city and the suburbs are the suburbs.

Anyway, I hope we don't get dragged back into the abyss here and the larger point gets missed. I don't think people are referring to the whole MSA when they reference a particular city but with very few exceptions like NYC, I also believe they aren't talking about ONLY the official municipality/city proper either. In most cases, they are referring to the city proper and close-in suburbs (except those that may be in another state, but it depends), particularly when they have amenities that are associated with the city itself. Most people don't know where the city proper or MSA boundaries for a place begin or end, so they rely on the "eye test" and common sense which doesn't go as far out as the MSA but typically extends beyond the city proper. Even in Atlanta that's the case as you won't see people referring to the outer suburban counties like Dawson or Butts as "Atlanta" but they will talk about places like SunTrust Park and the Arena at Gwinnett as being in Atlanta.
Lol I won't drag us into the abyss, but I have a ton of rebuttal for your "peer" remark. You can say Los Angeles has no peers, being the only county in the country with over 10 million people, it's one of only two counties with over 5 million...there is a variety of different angles we can take with a NY or LA debate, but I'll concede to not drag us too far off topic...

I don't disagree with any other point you made...
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Old 06-21-2019, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,211 posts, read 2,828,597 times
Reputation: 4497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
I thought you was already in the convo Murk, LoL. You further prove what I stated ( Bolded) and the ambiguous viewpoints. When we're speaking on Black culture by region , people often overlook the non metros areas. Regional distinctions also have to include the micro areas & rural too.
I agree with you here!
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Old 06-21-2019, 02:48 PM
 
29,933 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Lol I won't drag us into the abyss, but I have a ton of rebuttal for your "peer" remark. You can say Los Angeles has no peers, being the only county in the country with over 10 million people, it's one of only two counties with over 5 million...there is a variety of different angles we can take with a NY or LA debate, but I'll concede to not drag us too far off topic...
I can actually agree with that. LA has the softest city/suburb distinction of any of the country's big cities and it's not really geographically separated from them. LA is very much unique in this regard, and NYC is very unique for the type of city it is also.
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Old 06-22-2019, 05:57 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
349 posts, read 107,435 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
White people from NH say Boston because they think that they ought to be able to claim Boston because they are white. They use the excuse “well you wouldn’t know where I was from!” And I reply so?? You’re from nowhere...own it ����*♂️. Anywhere in NH is at least 35 miles from Boston and at least 20 miles from urbanity.. NH is cow country. People who claim Boston like that usually have only gone for fields trips and are thoroughly ridiculed and rebuffed by Bostonians and people who actually live in adjacent cities. Based off New England has strong and defined town identities there are people in those towns who think you’re a poser for not claiming said town.
Oh word, but I can see that. Boston is proper is pretty White so it's definitely a city for urban White people. I remember watching an episode of Blackish and the episode was a about a black kid getting bullied by a white boy from Boston. The black dad was even scared he was like "white boys from Boston don't play". Boston white people must be pretty tough which is understandable with the accent. A white kid from Boston must get a ton of street cred among White people.
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Old 06-22-2019, 06:09 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
349 posts, read 107,435 times
Reputation: 330
Yeah I never hear a person from South Jersey or North Delaware claim Phily. I bet people from chester or Landcaster do but not in Jersey or Delaware.
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