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Old 06-26-2019, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,211 posts, read 2,828,597 times
Reputation: 4497

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
Black people outside of city data do that all the time! "Suburban" is code for white, and "urban" is code for black.

"Inner city" is also a code for black. I don't think people would refer to Compton as "inner city" if it were wealthier and predominately white. Like how white people from Manhattan aren't considered "inner city" even though they live in the most urban area in the whole country.
"Inner city" in the sense that you describe was a long established media directive driven from systemic discriminatory ideology. Yes, there are people who still refer to inner city and black as one and the same, but that's not what I mean, and that's not what anyone I've seen speak in here means if they reference "urban" or "inner city"...

Inner city Los Angeles is basically synonymous with the urban core of LA, which is Central LA + South LA. LA is pretty segregated overall, but when I reference inner city LA, I'm talking about the core hoods in Central and South LA. Compton is basically any Latino neighborhood in core LA. Culturally, Compton is just a larger version of Watts, which is an actual LA neighborhood directly to the north. There is no measurable difference in build and demographics when passing from one to the other, they share much of the same public and public transportation infrastructure, etc. Compton is a larger area so the further out you go, the less developed it becomes, but transitioning to Compton from Watts or Athens, which are actual South LA neighborhoods, there is no dramatic drop off...

Again, it will always technically be an LA suburb because it is technically it's own municipality. And it is built in a suburban fashion. But practically speaking, most of Compton isn't a suburb, it's a continuation of South LA...
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Old 06-26-2019, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,211 posts, read 2,828,597 times
Reputation: 4497
Foamposite, also just to briefly take it back to Sharif's initial statement about an author comparing Compton and Jackson, they are only comparable when talking about poverty and violence rates. They don't resemble each other demographically, culturally, or physically...
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Old 06-26-2019, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,218 posts, read 1,301,825 times
Reputation: 2050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
10k ppsm is suburban. That's only slightly more than Levittown, NY, ground zero of American suburbia. Compton is made up mostly of detached 1 family houses with driveways.

People mistakenly use the term "urban" to mean black.
10kppsm is SUBURBAN???? Laughable
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Old 06-26-2019, 06:54 AM
 
56,600 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Actually, they are included under Rural definitions. Generally, urban areas with a core(s) 10K-50K still get this classification often. That's why when people picture rural a farm / blink town/ countryside county comes to mind. Yet , a small moderate cityscape with similar amenities to a metro city isn't the ideal picture of rural area per say. This is one of the prime reasons i bring Micropolitan areas into Black culture discussions.

Reminds me of the author of The Hate U Give whose from North Jackson. Her personal experience she shared in a interview about people finding out she's from Mississippi and being asked something along the lines " You grew up on a farm?" and she responded with " No. My neighborhood is more like Compton." I smirked and realized people don't realized how urban the Sipp Black community is.
I’m referring to the actual municipality versus micropolitan areas, which is what you are referring to. For instance, there are literally municipalities that have say 2700 people and actually are an urban cluster. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_urban_area

https://www.census.gov/programs-surv...ban-rural.html

I only mentioned that aspect because you can have a small city like Dowagiac MI or a (former) village like Lyons NY that both have a visible black population that is in a small town environment, but are viewed as “urban” due to a census definition.

Good points, as you even get that in other regions as the people in the Bos-Wash portion of the Northeast get surprised when smaller cities further inland/upstate have certain amenities or public housing. So, they may not know that a micro area like say Auburn NY has the Harriet Tubman Museum/Home, the Booker T. Washington Community Center or the Melone Village housing complex. So, people do “sleep” on what many smaller or even lesser known places have.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 06-26-2019 at 07:13 AM..
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Old 06-26-2019, 07:23 AM
 
29,933 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
In my opinion, yes. Compton looks like a suburban neighborhood to me too. If it were populated by white people, it would be considered the suburbs.
I think the point is that in relation to the Deep South, Compton would pretty much be considered urban. It's all relative, especially when you're talking about one of the most densely populated metro areas in the country.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,038 posts, read 630,010 times
Reputation: 643
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I’m referring to the actual municipality versus micropolitan areas, which is what you are referring to. For instance, there are literally municipalities that have say 2700 people and actually are an urban cluster. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_urban_area

https://www.census.gov/programs-surv...ban-rural.html

I only mentioned that aspect because you can have a small city like Dowagiac MI or a (former) village like Lyons NY that both have a visible black population that is in a small town environment, but are viewed as “urban” due to a census definition.

Good points, as you even get that in other regions as the people in the Bos-Wash portion of the Northeast get surprised when smaller cities further inland/upstate have certain amenities or public housing. So, they may not know that a micro area like say Auburn NY has the Harriet Tubman Museum/Home, the Booker T. Washington Community Center or the Melone Village housing complex. So, people do “sleep” on what many smaller or even lesser known places have.
I know those links and that why i started with the core municipality definition of 10K-50K first. I was speaking on them first not the entire area. I'm from one and still live in a city of that size range. Yet , It's still broadly place in Rural category since it's not a Metropolitan area.

Perfect example and i didn't know Auburn had that museum. I'll say people will continue to sleep on these places , especially some of our young Black people. If it's not in a metro , they're not interested in it. Some of the older and hobby oriented brothers & sisters will visit it. So much Black history/culture in these small cities that I'm still exploring in my state alone.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,038 posts, read 630,010 times
Reputation: 643
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Foamposite, also just to briefly take it back to Sharif's initial statement about an author comparing Compton and Jackson, they are only comparable when talking about poverty and violence rates. They don't resemble each other demographically, culturally, or physically...
And lingo too, JU.
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:27 PM
Status: "Destroying False Hope..." (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Houston for Living/Los Angeles for Work
1,176 posts, read 399,605 times
Reputation: 1522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think the point is that in relation to the Deep South, Compton would pretty much be considered urban. It's all relative, especially when you're talking about one of the most densely populated metro areas in the country.
I would consider Compton (and almost all of the LA area) suburban. Its more dense of course, but its suburban density not urban density.
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:28 PM
 
29,933 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18458
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
I would consider Compton (and almost all of the LA area) suburban. Its more dense of course, but its suburban density not urban density.
Again, compared to the Deep South (Mississippi), it's urban density. As I said, it's relative.
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:58 PM
Status: "Destroying False Hope..." (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Houston for Living/Los Angeles for Work
1,176 posts, read 399,605 times
Reputation: 1522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Again, compared to the Deep South (Mississippi), it's urban density. As I said, it's relative.
Well, compared to Mississippi almost everything is urban. But urban and suburban arent relative terms in my opinion.
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