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View Poll Results: Which major city has the worst overall weather in the U.S.
Seattle 31 8.47%
San Francisco 9 2.46%
San Diego 7 1.91%
Minneapolis 101 27.60%
Oklahoma City 50 13.66%
Houston 72 19.67%
Phoenix 54 14.75%
Other major city in the continuous U.S. 42 11.48%
Voters: 366. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-18-2016, 08:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B.I.0.N.I.C. View Post
But you will in Phoenix's dry heat (and California in the inland desert areas).



Water bottles are an even greater demand in dry heat, lest you shrivel up, and bake to a crisp, dying of dehydration. Such effects aren't so severe in humid heat.

Another thing with humid heat is that it prevents moisture from being sapped from the body, unlike dry heat; thus, skin remains moister, and the people can look younger, and more luscious (especially the women, if you know what I mean).

Dehydration happened to me in the humid heat and it hit fast. Never in California. Not even close to that level of dehydration.

Humidity is torture . It's not a bogie man. It's just awful weather.
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Old 02-18-2016, 08:47 PM
 
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It may keep your skin moister but who wants to be out in it?
People just put up with it. Very few prefer it.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:05 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,154,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddy K View Post
Lol
At these guys saying humidity is in the mind. Are you serious? I had three severe het injuries because of humidity.
It's hellish weather.

I lived in Chicago for ten years and DC for 19. The weather channel warns people to stay where it's cool or inside when those heat indexes hit 100.

I don't see those warnings in California
Those warnings are for people who need to be reminded to take precaution, just like they have to remind people not to drive in flood conditions. There's always that group that doesn't exercise good sense on their own, so they have to be told to do so.

Most people don't have a problem with heat related injuries.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:06 PM
 
196 posts, read 146,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i'm not a cookie View Post
Nope, but humidity causes a risk of heat stroke, heat exhaustion, bacteria growing(including in the lungs), frizzy hair, and dilated blood vessels. Lower humidity makes the heat feel more bearable, because humid weather prevents the evaporation of sweat and the cooling for our bodies that sweat evaporation provides. So, in a place with 60 percent humidity, 90 degrees feels to the body like 115 degrees thus leading to these incidences.
Everything in bold can also be caused by dry heat as well. In addition, dry heat exasperates skin conditions, dries out the moist areas of our body (leading to things like nose bleeds, scratchy throat, etc), and just plain dehydration in general.

Once again, even accounting for the added heat feel from humidity, Houston's heat indexes are still less than those of Phoenix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddy K View Post
Dehydration happened to me in the humid heat and it hit fast. Never in California. Not even close to that level of dehydration.

Humidity is torture . It's not a bogie man. It's just awful weather.
1.) We are discussing dry heat in the desert, not in coastal California. Even then, California away from the coast still gets dangerously hot temps, with higher heat indexes than that seen in Houston, and the coastal South.

2.)Dehydration will happen faster in dry heat; all the moisture evaporates. In humid heat, the moisture, at least, is more retained, as the air is saturated.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
1,934 posts, read 1,698,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B.I.0.N.I.C. View Post
Everything in bold can also be caused by dry heat as well. In addition, dry heat exasperates skin conditions, dries out the moist areas of our body (leading to things like nose bleeds, scratchy throat, etc), and just plain dehydration in general.

Once again, even accounting for the added heat feel from humidity, Houston's heat indexes are still less than those of Phoenix.



1.) We are discussing dry heat in the desert, not in coastal California. Even then, California away from the coast still gets dangerously hot temps, with higher heat indexes than that seen in Houston, and the coastal South.

2.)Dehydration will happen faster in dry heat; all the moisture evaporates. In humid heat, the moisture, at least, is more retained, as the air is saturated.
All i've seen you do is rag on phoenix and dry climate areas for 5 pages, yet you voted for Oklahoma city for the worst weather, out of curiosity, why did you vote for Oklahoma city?
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:30 PM
 
196 posts, read 146,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i'm not a cookie View Post
All i've seen you do is rag on phoenix and dry climate areas for 5 pages, yet you voted for Oklahoma city for the worst weather, out of curiosity, why did you vote for Oklahoma city?
I never was arguing that Phoenix had the worst overall climate; I actually agree that it is one of the better climates in this country (despite the dryness), very great for escaping the wild winter weather much of the country deals with. Winter in Phoenix is very nice.

All I was doing was disagreeing with the notion that Phoenix's dry heat would be more comfortable than Houston's humid heat. I also dislike the dry climate compared to the humid climate. But that's where it ends; I think both cities have ideal climates compared to much of the rest of this country.

I voted OKC for worst weather because it gets hot and humid during summer, but without the strong chance of relief from summer thunderstorms like Houston. OKC also doesn't have the benefit of nice winters like Phoenix and Houston; instead, it goes right to getting blizzards and deep freezes in winter. And then you have the threat of killer twisters, hailstorms, etc, in spring. No thanks.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:36 PM
 
1,687 posts, read 987,692 times
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[quote=B.I.0.N.I.C.;43063685]Everything in bold can also be caused by dry heat as well. In addition, dry heat exasperates skin conditions, dries out the moist areas of our body (leading to things like nose bleeds, scratchy throat, etc), and just plain dehydration in general.

Once again, even accounting for the added heat feel from humidity, Houston's heat indexes are still less than those of Phoenix.



1.) We are discussing dry heat in the desert, not in coastal California. Even then, California away from the coast still gets dangerously hot temps, with higher heat indexes than that seen in Houston, and the coastal South.

2.)Dehydration will happen faster in dry heat; all the moisture evaporates. In humid heat, the moisture, at least, is more retained, as the air is

It's hell. Humidity also brings out mosquitoes. Everything about it sucks.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:43 PM
 
196 posts, read 146,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddy K View Post
LOL when does coastal California get those crazy heat index temp you see in the south?
I don't know how you put up with it. It's hell.
I said California AWAY from the coast gets those heat indexes, not coastal California. The humidity may not be high, but the temps themselves are searing, enough to bring up the heat indexes. And it is more unbearable than in the South, because unlike in the South, there is not much, if any, cloud cover, no summer thunderstorms to quench the air, natural shade isn't as intensive, and (in far inland areas), you don't have the cooling sea-breezes.

While rare, areas of coastal California can get heat waves, which can bring temps to searing levels; record high temps even along the coast, in areas like San Diego are at/above 110F, which is hotter than anything seen in much of the South.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddy K View Post
It's hell. Humidity also brings out mosquitoes. Everything about it sucks.
Mosquitoes are found pretty much everywhere, even above the Arctic Circle. In fact, the Arctic tundra is where you find the worst swarms.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:51 PM
 
1,687 posts, read 987,692 times
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I haven't seen them here in two years.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:53 PM
 
1,687 posts, read 987,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B.I.0.N.I.C. View Post
I said California AWAY from the coast gets those heat indexes, not coastal California. The humidity may not be high, but the temps themselves are searing, enough to bring up the heat indexes. And it is more unbearable than in the South, because unlike in the South, there is not much, if any, cloud cover, no summer thunderstorms to quench the air, natural shade isn't as intensive, and (in far inland areas), you don't have the cooling sea-breezes.

While rare, areas of coastal California can get heat waves, which can bring temps to searing levels; record high temps even along the coast, in areas like San Diego are at/above 110F, which is hotter than anything seen in much of the South.




Mosquitoes are found pretty much everywhere, even above the Arctic Circle. In fact, the Arctic tundra is where you find the worst swarms.
Any heat index over 100 in coastal California is much rarer then in the south.
I've been in Florida on the beach in that muggy weather
Sea breezes didn't do a thing.
It's suffocating , unbearable heat.

The breezes didn't help in Chicago either.
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