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View Poll Results: Which major city has the worst overall weather in the U.S.
Seattle 31 8.47%
San Francisco 9 2.46%
San Diego 7 1.91%
Minneapolis 101 27.60%
Oklahoma City 50 13.66%
Houston 72 19.67%
Phoenix 54 14.75%
Other major city in the continuous U.S. 42 11.48%
Voters: 366. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-28-2015, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
Reputation: 2896

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Well, the "Rust Belt," whatever you think that is, is not in fact "losing population." In fact, very few words you've written have a lick of truth behind them. People are NOT moving to the "warm weather locations" that "have lesser economies," they are moving to places (regardless of climate) where the jobs are, just like it's been since the beginning of time in the country and around the world. In fact, the state I personally believe to have the worst overall weather in the country (North Dakota), is the fastest growing state in the country. Wow, how is that even possible in your world?!?!? *EXPLOSION*

How do you explain the northern migration that came before the current southern one? People liked different climates then? No, as usual - JOBS. ECONOMY. As with now, as with the past, as with the future.

And yes, Phoenix was included because it has horrible summer weather. You could easily argue that a cold-weather spot (Minny) will win simply because the hot weather spots have split the votes. I am perfectly fine with my winter because it doesn't lead to a half a year+ of brutal, blistering summer. I would say that you're feably trying to justify YOUR position via poor logic regardless of all evidence to the contrary. Do you really think everyone up north would prefer living in Phoenix? To me, this is passive-aggressive behavior on your part, as well a heavy dose of narcissism. Not everyone thinks exactly like you....or they'd all live in Phoenix. Why the hell are you in Boston if you hate the weather so?
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Old 05-28-2015, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,592 posts, read 17,582,380 times
Reputation: 27682
To me, either Houston or Minneapolis during their worst seasons. Minneapolis is nice in summer, assuming Houston is nice in the winter.
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Old 05-28-2015, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,599,015 times
Reputation: 722
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Well, the "Rust Belt," whatever you think that is, is not in fact "losing population." In fact, very few words you've written have a lick of truth behind them. People are NOT moving to the "warm weather locations" that "have lesser economies," they are moving to places (regardless of climate) where the jobs are, just like it's been since the beginning of time in the country and around the world. In fact, the state I personally believe to have the worst overall weather in the country (North Dakota), is the fastest growing state in the country. Wow, how is that even possible in your world?!?!? *EXPLOSION*
You ignored my response about Florida? People are moving to Florida despite the lousy job market. People from the midwest are even prepared to take drastic pay cuts ("sunshine tax") so they can live here. beaches and weather being the only reason.

North Dakota can be the "fastest growing state in the country" because it had almost no people before.
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Old 05-28-2015, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
You ignored my response about Florida? People are moving to Florida despite the lousy job market. People from the midwest are even prepared to take drastic pay cuts ("sunshine tax") so they can live here. beaches and weather being the only reason.

North Dakota can be the "fastest growing state in the country" because it had almost no people before.
Florida attracts retirees who are going to die within a decade or so, not young professionals from the north. I've never met a single person in my life who took less money just to move somewhere warm. Sunshine Tax sounds like a local marketing puff, never heard of it.

North Dakota is the fastest-growing state in the country because of JOBS, period.
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Old 05-28-2015, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,599,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Florida attracts retirees who are going to die within a decade or so, not young professionals from the north. I've never met a single person in my life who took less money just to move somewhere warm. Sunshine Tax sounds like a local marketing puff, never heard of it..
It happens all the time, hence the term "Sunshine Tax". And if you want to see young professionals from Wisconsin, New York, Massachusetts, clamoring to move to Florida, just browse the Florida forums.
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Old 05-28-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Perinton, NY
98 posts, read 87,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MynameisSam View Post
Finally, someone who makes sense.

We understand that Upstate NY doesn't have the cities to really pull the media spotlight on them, but enough about Minneapolis already.

The worst weather city in the country is Syracuse, NY and its not even close, and its obvious nobody has lived there or Upstate NY for that matter.

Upstate NY winters are worse than Minnesota winters IMO, and a big reason for that is because Upstate NY cities average 100+ inches of snow a year. Boston set a record this year at around 110 inches. Thats average for Syracuse.

Syracuse gets just as cold as Minneapolis, but it snows way more, and its much much more gloomy. Its as gloomy as Seattle/Portland/Pittsburgh/Buffalo/Cleveland.


For example, this past winter, Syracuse received over 100 inches of snowfall, averaged 17% days with sunshine from November-March, and set a record for cold temperatures for the month of February (average of 9 degrees). If that isn't a winter from hell, I don't know what is.

Summers are muggy and hot. Thus far, its been stormy and hot (high 80s) most of May.

The last two years of living in Central NY, have been among the worst weather ive ever experienced. Two horrid winters (record cold, snow, lack of sun) and summer last year was awful. It rained constantly and was below average temperature wise.

Minneapolis winters are not that snowy (to someone here at least), and are much sunnier. They're only colder but even lately the temperatures have been very similar. Summers are very hot, but in general, Minneapolis is much much sunnier than Syracuse. I think Minneapolis gets almost 60% sun. Syracuse gets 45%.

In general, Upstate NY is not a sunny place at all. Definitely even with the Northwest. On top of 100" of snowfall and brutal cold.
agreed. i live in rochester. that being said, i kind of like the weather (minus the excessive snow and super low temps), which is why i am possibly interested in a move to seattle. ill keep the gloom and rain, but wouldnt mind dropping the snow and freeze.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,319,838 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pac_5 View Post
Irrelevant. 50 city-data "enthusiasts" voting on an unrepresentative sample set is completely unscientific, if that is what you are getting at. We can hypothesize, however, and I will hypothesize that defensive people generally try and justify the crappy weather they endure through passive-aggressive means - sort of a choice-supportive bias via a silly online poll. On a whole, people vote with their feet, and generally leave cold weather for warm weather.




It means that there remains a tremendous net migration away from cold weather to warm weather. The census bureau itself stated that in the next 30 years, 90% of US population growth will occur in the "sun belt" states, and a large component of that remains net migration (sorry, can't dump that one on immigrants). The Rust Belt will continue to lose population, even though plenty of warm weather locations have lesser economies. Nobody really wants to live in crappy weather unless they have to, and for most people, cold weather and cloudiness is crappy weather.

Everyone has an opinion - I just found the list rather odd and not conforming to any particular characterization. How can you have a discussion on "worst overall weather in the US" and almost completely leave out the Midwest and Eastern Seaboard, but include San Diego, San Francisco (with the "cold summers") and Phoenix? It is a self-serving list, even for a Bostonian such as myself.
I don't think any of this is true. The Rust Belt will not lose population this year, next year, or in the next 20, 50 or 100 years. In fact, I bet it'll grow exponentially. You have to accept the fact that weather is not everybody's #1 reason for living, and in fact, it's not even in most peoples' top 3. For instance, I personally care more about: cost of living, jobs/income, education, safety, walkability/urban, presence of family/friends, etc.

I will contend to agree that people prefer warm/mild over cold, on average, but you'd better believe that economies and quality/cost of living is a big factor that Sun Belt states cannot simply ignore forever (if they are).

Last edited by Min-Chi-Cbus; 05-28-2015 at 12:13 PM..
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,319,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
You ignored my response about Florida? People are moving to Florida despite the lousy job market. People from the midwest are even prepared to take drastic pay cuts ("sunshine tax") so they can live here. beaches and weather being the only reason.

North Dakota can be the "fastest growing state in the country" because it had almost no people before.
Seattle and Denver have adverse weather (rain and cold/snow, respectively), and they're booming. Minneapolis, Indy, Columbus and KC are all growing moderately fast, and they have some of the worst weather in the country. Even NYC, Chicago, Boston, Philly and DC -- which all bleed people to warmer states -- continue to become unique urban meccas that people are highly attracted to, despite the fact that all get cold and snow during winter. Other fast-growing cities that are cold outside of ND include: Des Moines (IA), Madison (WI), Grand Rapids (MI), Omaha (NE), Salt Lake City (UT), or Boise (ID).

I don't see a perfect/strong correlation between warmth and growth, personally. There IS a correlation, but it's not strong enough to predict growth by itself, IMO.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,319,838 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
It happens all the time, hence the term "Sunshine Tax". And if you want to see young professionals from Wisconsin, New York, Massachusetts, clamoring to move to Florida, just browse the Florida forums.
I also see Floridians clamoring to move North to places like MN to escape the heat and humidity, but a scientific correlation that does not make.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I also see Floridians clamoring to move North to places like MN to escape the heat and humidity, but a scientific correlation that does not make.
Right, I have friends in town from Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida, California, Texas, etc. Doesn't mean they're all leaving the south to avoid hot weather. In most cases they came due to jobs. Just like the people who move south, excepting retirees...who have one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel. People under retirement age move to improve their economic circumstances first, by a very large margin.
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