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View Poll Results: Which is the best city in the Lower Midwest?
Kansas City, MO 23 35.94%
St. Louis, MO 11 17.19%
Indianapolis, IN 11 17.19%
Columbus, OH 19 29.69%
Voters: 64. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-26-2015, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
If the OP is looking for something that is undeniably within the definition of the Midwest then you're right, Louisville does not belong. If the OP is looking at those cities, and would consider other cities that share similarities culturally and climate wise, I don't see why it wouldn't.
Sure, I would agree.
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Old 05-26-2015, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
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I think Des Moines should be on your list. I lived in Cols, OH for 17 years up until two years ago, but the economy is getting bad, again. The economy here is much better.
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Old 05-26-2015, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Uh....Columbus is a 2 hour drive from Kentucky (the South). Indy, less than that. Both are about 7-8 hour drive straight north to the UP.

Both are certainly in the Lower Midwest - no question. Just look at a map. I live way the hell north of both, and it's still many hours to the northern reaches of the Midwest.


Southern line of Missouri should be more Northern tho.
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Old 05-26-2015, 03:47 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerstrp1 View Post
I'm just curious, what's a "Texas City"? I ask because I love (and love) Kansas City, but may be moving to Houston by year's end.
I'm talking primarily about the setting, the built environment the development patterns and the social climate. It's on the edge of the Great Plains, just like Dallas/Fort Worth, and development seems to have a distinct edge to it. You can be only 20 to 25 miles from downtown Kansas City and see farms and gravel roads just off the highway, not unlike what happens around Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston. Take a drive north, south or west of Fort Worth, or west of Katy, and see what happens. It reminds me of what happens when you drive north of Liberty or east of Independence. Kansas City proper is somewhat liberal, but not super-liberal, while the suburbs are conservative. That kind of social dynamic is very similar to Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston. The only real difference in social climate in Kansas City vis-a-vis Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston is that Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston have more of a nouveau riche vibe due to their explosive growth, and they also have more diversity, though Kansas City isn't devoid of diversity as some might claim. It's also worth noting that western Missouri was part of what somebody who analyzed Facebook networks called "Greater Texas," meaning that people in western Missouri who used Facebook had a lot of friends and connections to people in Texas, and also in other parts of "Greater Texas" (Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas, northern Louisiana, eastern New Mexico).
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Old 05-26-2015, 05:28 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
I'd go KC, StL, Columbus then Indy in that order.

I think there is very little recognizably "Texan" about KC, for the record. It is certainly nothing like any of the cities of Texas. In fact, the only city you listed that's anything like anyplace in Texas is Columbus, which has some pretty important things in common with Austin, i.e., capital city/colossal college town combination, growth, white collar economy, etc.

I think I'd also look at Cincinnati, which is kind of mix of KC and StL culturally and physically, and Louisville as well, which I don't consider midwestern, but is in the same climate belt and has a kind of unique vibe for a place of its size.
I think KC fits the bill pretty well. I agree it isn't "Texan" but its culture is a bit more similar to TX than the other three. Barbecue, rodeos are two examples that come to mind. And being relatively much closer to TX than the others, KC gets a LOT of TX transplants.
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Old 05-27-2015, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
I'm talking primarily about the setting, the built environment the development patterns and the social climate. It's on the edge of the Great Plains, just like Dallas/Fort Worth, and development seems to have a distinct edge to it. You can be only 20 to 25 miles from downtown Kansas City and see farms and gravel roads just off the highway, not unlike what happens around Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston. Take a drive north, south or west of Fort Worth, or west of Katy, and see what happens. It reminds me of what happens when you drive north of Liberty or east of Independence. Kansas City proper is somewhat liberal, but not super-liberal, while the suburbs are conservative. That kind of social dynamic is very similar to Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston. The only real difference in social climate in Kansas City vis-a-vis Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston is that Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston have more of a nouveau riche vibe due to their explosive growth, and they also have more diversity, though Kansas City isn't devoid of diversity as some might claim. It's also worth noting that western Missouri was part of what somebody who analyzed Facebook networks called "Greater Texas," meaning that people in western Missouri who used Facebook had a lot of friends and connections to people in Texas, and also in other parts of "Greater Texas" (Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas, northern Louisiana, eastern New Mexico).
You can see these things in the North East and several other regions across the country. Farms and rural life are not unique to the Midwest. The same goes for hunting and fishing.
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Old 05-27-2015, 07:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post

Southern line of Missouri should be more Northern tho.
One would have trouble convincing me of the validity of any map that has Indianapolis, Omaha or Des Moines in a different category of the midwest than KC. Des Moines is like a mini-KC, Omaha is a like a demi-KC, Indy is like KC-lite.

Basically, what I'm saying is I don't think the "middle belt" of your midwestern map exists.
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
One would have trouble convincing me of the validity of any map that has Indianapolis, Omaha or Des Moines in a different category of the midwest than KC. Des Moines is like a mini-KC, Omaha is a like a demi-KC, Indy is like KC-lite.

Basically, what I'm saying is I don't think the "middle belt" of your midwestern map exists.
It doesn't. Also funny how the "official line" for lower Midwest is squiggled juuuust below both Indy and Columbus (before it raises again to the north), hmmmm....I also never realized that Bay City MI, Madison, Milwaukee, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin Dells, Decorah IA and the like were "officially" NOT Upper Midwestern until a European who has never been here "schooled" me. The joys of learning, C-D salut!
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,268 posts, read 5,473,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
It doesn't. Also funny how the "official line" for lower Midwest is squiggled juuuust below both Indy and Columbus (before it raises again to the north), hmmmm....I also never realized that Bay City MI, Madison, Milwaukee, Grand Rapids, Wisconsin Dells, Decorah IA and the like were "officially" NOT Upper Midwestern until a European who has never been here "schooled" me. The joys of learning, C-D salut!
Yeah, Illinois is pretty messed up on the map, too.
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Old 05-27-2015, 03:24 PM
 
7,906 posts, read 4,866,693 times
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Check out Cleveland if you can put up with snow for two months per year, but Clevelanders play in it -- cross country trails, sledding, ski and tubing slopes in the metropolitan area, ice fishing, even toboggan runs.

Lake Erie in summer, great parks including Cuyahoga Valley National Park, great dining scene, very good cost of living, good suburban and private schools, and University Circle is one of the nation's cultural centers and superb for children. E.g., see post 8 in this thread.

Another "moving to Cleveland post" with specific questions

It sounds as if you would enjoy PlayhouseSquare, one of the nation's top theater complexes, and the Cleveland Orchestra, one of the best in the world. Cedar Point, the roller coaster capital of the world, is one hour west of downtown Cleveland.

Ohio has a unique feature if you like parks. The major metropolitan areas have "Metroparks," which essentially are county park systems, such as the Cleveland Metroparks "Emerald Necklace," which almost is a century old and has nature preserves that would have been developed in many metropolitan areas across the country.

Ohio and western PA have great deer hunting seasons.

Also, check out Holden Arboretum, one of the largest and best in the country.

Ohio State is just over 2 hrs. from Cleveland, but there are local Mid-American Conference teams at Kent State and Akron and superb Div. III teams such as John Carroll and Mount Union.

Last edited by WRnative; 05-27-2015 at 03:37 PM..
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