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Old 05-29-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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To me the upper Midwest is in an area that is in the north woods, where coniferous and mixed deciduous forests are predominant, and has a very strong hunting culture, and the lower Midwest is more industrial and has large swaths of farmland, and has forests that are decidous in nature, not full of pines like up north. These two regions are very different from eachother, which is why I feel they should be separate sub regions. Using a highway as a dividing line between them doesn't make any sense to me, nor does lumping whole states into one region, like Michigan, who's Northern and southern regions are very different from eachother.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
To me the upper Midwest is in an area that is in the north woods, where coniferous and mixed deciduous forests are predominant, and has a very strong hunting culture, and the lower Midwest is more industrial and has large swaths of farmland, and has forests that are decidous in nature, not full of pines like up north. These two regions are very different from eachother, which is why I feel they should be separate sub regions. Using a highway as a dividing line between them doesn't make any sense to me, nor does lumping whole states into one region, like Michigan, who's Northern and southern regions are very different from eachother.
There is a huge hunting and fishing culture across the entirety of the Midwest, so I don't think that factor would be decisive.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:35 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,903,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
To me the upper Midwest is in an area that is in the north woods, where coniferous and mixed deciduous forests are predominant, and has a very strong hunting culture, and the lower Midwest is more industrial and has large swaths of farmland, and has forests that are decidous in nature, not full of pines like up north. These two regions are very different from eachother, which is why I feel they should be separate sub regions. Using a highway as a dividing line between them doesn't make any sense to me, nor does lumping whole states into one region, like Michigan, who's Northern and southern regions are very different from eachother.
I see what you are saying. It makes sense because you are in from southern Ontario so you can see the big difference between northern and southern Ontario. It is sort of the Upper Midwest is the "vacation land", the more natural area of lakes and woods which is very different from the more developed urbanized and agricultural parts of the Midwest.

This map shows the heart of the Upper Midwest, it would probably would extend further south to include the driftless area or the vacation areas along Lake Michigan and Lake Huron?.

Laurentian Mixed Forest Province - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-29-2015, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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He's talking about the Canadian Shield. I can see that. I grew up there. But the northwoods are very much tied to the biggest cities below them, like Twin Cities, Milwaukee, and Detroit. Very much. And it's a very popular Chicago vacation destination. I think it's close enough to include those cities below with the geographical features a bit north of them. Some accent/politcal ties, as well, as MN/WI/MI have their northwoods directed by downstate.
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Old 05-29-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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To me the dividing line between the two is pretty easy to see.

Language: The Upper Midwest speaks Northern dialects, the Lower Midwest speaks Midland dialects. This means northern Ohio (Cleveland, Toledo) Indiana (Gary) and Illinois (Chicago, mostly) are Upper Midwestern.



Politics: In the Upper Midwest, rural areas are either moderately Republican or Democratic leaning (virtually none vote over 60% Republican). In the lower Midwest, rural areas can be deeply Republican.



Historic building style: Northern Midwestern cities mostly have frame houses with generous setbacks from the street. Southern Midwestern houses are more commonly brick, with smaller setbacks. Occasionally you even find rowhouses, but more commonly semi-attached or "detached rowhouse" styles.





Chicago is the outlier here, as it has characteristics of both housing vernaculars.
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Old 05-29-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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^ Excellent post!
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Old 05-29-2015, 03:44 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
I have never heard of La Crosse in my life, or Dubuque, if they are sparsely populated towns, who honestly cares? A highway won't be perfect, but I think the 90 does the best job. The 80 includes too much of a the lower midwest into the fold.

Now the 90 goes through Madison, so it's technically "upper midwest" by the definition. Sioux Falls, who cares. To me the Dakotas are not the midwest but doesn't the 90 run through Sioux Falls, so it's a "transition" zone?

Edit: I see that the 90 passes slightly north of Madison. Oh well, close enough.
No one in this part of the country says "the 80." It's I-80. Not that it really matters, but it is a dead giveaway that you are giving an outsider's perspective.
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Old 05-29-2015, 03:50 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Absolutely, it's much closer to Ohio than Minnesota, and is south of the halfway point between North and south Midwest, and is only a four hour drive to Kentucky. Plus, the vegetation is broad leaf deciduous, not coniferous or mixed like up north.
Tree types are not a perfect measuring stick. Yes, you will generally see more evergreens in the northern parts of MN, WI, and MI, and the forest type is a decent indicator of Upper vs Lower Midwest. But I have been in parts of both MI and WI where you are definitely in the Upper Midwest and there is not an evergreen in sight. Even parts of the U.P. can be almost completely deciduous trees, usually a high concentration of maples.
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Old 05-29-2015, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,597,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
No one in this part of the country says "the 80." It's I-80. Not that it really matters, but it is a dead giveaway that you are giving an outsider's perspective.
I spent half of my formative years in Los Angeles, the other half in Detroit (Grosse Pointe). I know what I'm talking about, Wisconsin registers very little on my radar though, and Iowa even less.

Who cares how I say highway names? Or the fact I say soda instead of pop

Last edited by SDPMiami; 05-29-2015 at 05:17 PM..
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Old 05-29-2015, 06:04 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,071,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
I spent half of my formative years in Los Angeles, the other half in Detroit (Grosse Pointe). I know what I'm talking about, Wisconsin registers very little on my radar though, and Iowa even less.

Who cares how I say highway names? Or the fact I say soda instead of pop
I couldn't care less.
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