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Old 01-27-2018, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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I think if the state borders the south, it's a lower Midwestern state.

If it borders Canada or is surrounded by other northern states, it is the upper Midwest.

An exception being Ohio, which borders both the south and Canada (by water). I consider Ohio lower Midwest regardless.

That said, the Midwest is America's crossroads. To nitpick it down so much is a fool's errand. The Midwest harbors nearly every American culture somewhere, and it is in that unique collection of Americana-cultures that brings it together as one region, in my opinion.
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Old 01-28-2018, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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My line would be at least 50 miles to the South of the OPs line. Southern MI, WI etc have a lot more in common with the Northern parts.of their states than they do in places like Southern IL, IN or MO.
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Old 01-28-2018, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
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The 50th floor or so of the Willis Tower.
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Old 01-28-2018, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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I guess the border between the upper and lower Midwest is more of a grey zone, where aspects of both regions are present, much like the border between the northeast and southeast!

So maybe this Midwest middle zone covers extreme northern Illinois and Chicago, extreme southern Michigan up to and including Detroit, extreme northern Indiana including Fort Wayne, and extreme northern Ohio with both Toledo and Cleveland.

This zone would also extent into the central part of Iowa and Nebraska as well, including Des Moines and Omaha.
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Old 01-28-2018, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
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I honestly think it's a false dichotomy. We should really be dividing the Midwest into four regions: the North Central region, the Rust Belt/Great Lakes, the Midlands, and the Great Plains. Condensing it into two sub-regions might be more convenient but it creates weird intra-sub-regional juxtapositions.
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:12 AM
 
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Lower: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri
Upper: Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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Using state lines to determine the border just seems lazy, and doesn’t really explain anything. It’s not as easy as black and white, but rather shades of grey!
The “middle zone” is the border area that separates the two, and it’s much wider than just the sliver of a state line! It also has aspects of both regions, which makes total sense!
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:46 AM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Absolutely - again, the northwoods of MN/WI/MI are governed by Twin Cities/Milwaukee-Madison/Detroit-Lansing downstate, even though those cities are not within the Canadian Shield. And people in Chicago very much relate/love the northwoods (and vacation there).

If you're going to break out the northwoods, why not the Driftless? Actually makes more sense politically, sociologically, ethnically, economically, you name it, and it's just as distinct a geographic region. The reason is that these are subregions of subregions.
Exactly correct. Twin Cities, Chicago, Milwaukee, Madison, Detroit, Grand Rapids metro areas are certainly strongly influenced by the Northwoods because so many city people vacation there, own property there, or have family or friends that live there. This is not applicable to metros in the lower Midwest because people there rarely or never vacation in those areas. Instead they go south to the Ozarks, Appalachians, or Gulf Coast.
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Old 01-28-2018, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
The 50th floor or so of the Willis Tower.
Actually it's Madison Street which is the line that separates the earth's Northern and Southern hemispheres. In similiar fashion, State Street is where the divide for the other two hemispheres, Eastern and Western

These two baselines can locate any point on the planet. For example, the Effiel Tower in Paris is located at 24,712 N 2,537,809 E meaning it is 24,712 blocks north of Madison and 2,537,809 blocks east of State Street

As an Oak Parker and maybe even a dooper, I would expected you to know that, considering the east/west base line runs smack through the middle of the world's former largest village.

The Louis Sullivan designed former flagship store of Carson Pirie Scott is, of course, The Center of the Universe
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Old 01-29-2018, 03:43 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
Lower: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri
Upper: Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa
I generally agree but (if we are only going to have upper and lower with no middle category) I would put the Northern parts of Ohio, Indiana (especially NW IND) and Illinois in the upper Midwest. I would also put Southern Iowa in the lower Midwest.
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