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Old 05-30-2015, 08:07 PM
 
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I know it's human nature to exaggerate each others' differences, but looking at things objectively, I've found that it's a little overblown. A little background on myself, I grew up in metro Atlanta (northern suburbs), went to school in Nashville, then moved to San Francisco. There are definitely some differences in terms of the amount of professionals, but overall I felt like the interactions with people aren't that different. But then again I also moved here from a different country.
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:38 PM
 
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I feel there are differences between the regions of the country and maybe they are not too exaggerated. We have to remember that the United States is one of the most populous countries in the world. The population of one region in the United States might equal the population of an entire country in the world.
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Old 05-31-2015, 07:30 PM
 
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I think on a superficial level the regions are starting to seem more and more the same, like the decline of certain accents and the fact a Subway or a Walmart is the same everywhere, but I think LIVING in different regions you can tell differences in the way that people do things and in the laws and quality of life. It's increasingly becoming that certain regions are beholden and subservient to one or two industries, for example on the West Coast it's mostly tech and medicine, in Hawaii it's mostly tourism and the military, etc.
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Old 05-31-2015, 09:07 PM
 
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I feel the rural/urban, even rural/suburban, divide is greater than any regional divide. But one could argue that much of the Northeast and West, at least where the majority of the populations of those regions are concentrated, live in more urban or suburban areas rather than rural ones. When people hear "Northeast" they probably think of a faster pace of life, big cities, mass transit, density and old historic towns, stuff like that. When people hear "Midwest" they may think of cornfields or other farms, or flatter areas along with suburban developments, and Chicago as the one main major city. So perhaps people's perceptions of places, stereotypes you could say (which are not far off at least for the Northeast), show exaggerated differences. How accurate these differences are depends. But when I think of the Midwest and Northeast, I personally don't think of many similarities - but not in a negative way. I just think that they're different regions. They feel different to me. And yes I have been to three Midwestern states and all Northeastern ones so I have some experience. Just my opinion.

No place in America is drastically different culturally from another. It's not like you'd feel as if you're in another country, based on culture not necessarily topography, visiting a place on the other side or middle of the country. But I find there are discernible differences.
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Old 05-31-2015, 09:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
I think on a superficial level the regions are starting to seem more and more the same, like the decline of certain accents and the fact a Subway or a Walmart is the same everywhere, but I think LIVING in different regions you can tell differences in the way that people do things and in the laws and quality of life. It's increasingly becoming that certain regions are beholden and subservient to one or two industries, for example on the West Coast it's mostly tech and medicine, in Hawaii it's mostly tourism and the military, etc.
I agree, but at the same time, even chain places that are present all across the country can have different meanings or popularity. For example, here in the Northeast we have Walmarts but, at least in my area, they are seen as kind of more trashy, lower class dare I say, and not the most popular large retailer. I find Target to be much more prevalent and popular here. In the South, though, I get the impression that Walmarts are much more popular and seen as a more acceptable place to shop all around. People in the South (and even Midwest) really seem to love Walmart. I don't see it, but they obviously do.

But in general I think people make fun of Walmart and its shoppers. I mean, how many chain stores have a website like peopleofwalmart(dot)com dedicated to them and their (ahem) eccentric shoppers?
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Old 06-01-2015, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Midwest
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I don't think the differences are exaggerated. To really notice them you have to be in a region for at least a couple of months, but they are there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I agree, but at the same time, even chain places that are present all across the country can have different meanings or popularity. For example, here in the Northeast we have Walmarts but, at least in my area, they are seen as kind of more trashy, lower class dare I say, and not the most popular large retailer. I find Target to be much more prevalent and popular here. In the South, though, I get the impression that Walmarts are much more popular and seen as a more acceptable place to shop all around. People in the South (and even Midwest) really seem to love Walmart. I don't see it, but they obviously do.

But in general I think people make fun of Walmart and its shoppers. I mean, how many chain stores have a website like peopleofwalmart(dot)com dedicated to them and their (ahem) eccentric shoppers?
I'm an Amazon guy and if I lived in the PNW Fred Meyers would be my spot (Target like cleanliness with Walmart like selection...double win!), but outside of the PNW I go to Walmart. They have a better selection and usually a lot better prices than Target. I find most pro-Target people to be a little more pretentious and haughty...it is better for MILF watching though...
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:27 AM
 
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I think so, a bit. Rural vs Urban is a bigger divide. So is interior of country vs costal.

The Mountain West, Midwest, Southwest and South really aren't very different in terms of everyday life. There are a few differences, but nothing is really dramatic.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Yes, the differences are exaggerated. The United States as a whole is becoming more and more uniform with each passing year.

Nowadays, you can find many of the same lifestyles/amenities even in small cities that you will find in major urban areas. American culture has become similar almost everywhere. The internet has bridged nearly all the differences.
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Old 06-01-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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I think as communication opportunities become more and more available to everyone the lines are blurring rapidly. People are taking their cues on how they should aspire to live their lives from these sources. Most cities have very similar if not the same entertainment, housing, restaurants, clothing styles and people with the same aspirations.

I think uniqueness and individualism is a rare thing these days.
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Old 06-01-2015, 03:40 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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There are large differences but more based on side of town than by national region. Urban vs rural can also be a large difference. In my county / city the rich side of town is 50% college educated and has a life expectancy similar to Japan. The lower income half of the city average 10% college educated and has a life expectancy that's 10 years lower
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